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  • KianaInupiaq's Profile Photo

    Seek ye the LORD while he may...

    by KianaInupiaq Updated Jan 15, 2004

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Seek ye the LORD while he may be found, call ye upon him while he is near: Let the wicked forsake his way, and the unrighteous man his thoughts; and let him return unto the LORD, and he will have mercy upon him; and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon.. Isaiah 55:6-7

    Fondest memory: the pic on the left is a darn traffic jam, I was in Ceasaria a few hours before the sun went down and I thought that I could make it to Nazareth on time to take a few pics of the sunset because Nazareth is on a hill, but I ended up stuck in traffic for way too long.........the pic on the right is at Masada, you can either walk up the snake path on the eastern side or you can take this lift, the other way up is the ramp that the Romans built on the western side

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  • KianaInupiaq's Profile Photo

    highway into yerushalayim

    by KianaInupiaq Updated Jan 15, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: this photo is taken near mevaserret yerushalayim, if you are driving to jerusalem then you'd be driving straight down this highway then up the hill and that place that you see on the top of the pis is givat shaul, which basically is on the border of the municipality map of jerusalem

    yerushalayim highway

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  • vahiddavoodi's Profile Photo

    "PERSIAN GULF" IS FOREVER "PERSIAN" GULF...

    by vahiddavoodi Updated Sep 2, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: there are some alternatives which try to estabilish mistakes about persian gulf.
    some arab countries want to say "arab" gulf instead "persian".but they are wasting their time!
    i hereby tell that:
    PERSIAN GULF IS FOREVER PERSIAN GULF.

    sassanian map,PERSIAN GULF

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  • dr.firas's Profile Photo

    Lebanon

    by dr.firas Updated Jun 30, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Lebanon is special in the Middle East!
    I am not saying that only because I am half Lebanese!
    yes my Mother is from Lebanon!
    ha ha ha
    indeed Lebanon is a very interesting place to visit in the Middle East!
    Please check my Lebanon Modest page and see the Must see activities tips to know more about this great country!

    Beirut-Lebanon

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  • dr.firas's Profile Photo

    Syria

    by dr.firas Updated Jun 30, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Syria is a great place to visit in the Middle East!
    it is a rich culture country and very ancient and has many interesting places to visit!
    I would like to tell you that more information about Syrian Cities you can find in my Syria page!

    Me in Palmyra's Tombs!

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  • vahiddavoodi's Profile Photo

    IS IT ALLAH WHO COMMANDS YOU TO ...

    by vahiddavoodi Written May 30, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: You tell me to stop my Fire Worship! Us, Persians see the Love of Creator & power of inventor in the light of Sun & warmth of Fire. Lights & Warmth of the Sun & Fire makes us see the light of truth & warmens our hearts to the creator & to one another. It helps us to be kind to one another, it enlightens us & makes us to keep Mazda's Flame, alive in our hearts. Our lord is Ahura Mazda & it is strange that you people also, just discovered him & named him Allah O Akbar! But we are not the same as you, we are not in the same level as you. We help other human being, we spread love among humanity, we spread Good throughout the Earth, we have been spreading our culture but in respect for other cultures throughout the whole world for thousands of years, yet you in the name of Allah invade other men's land! You mass murder the people, create famine, fear & poverty for others, you create Evil in the name of Allah. who is responsible for all this catastrophe?
    Is it Allah who commands you to murder, pillage & to destroy?
    Is it you the followers of Allah who do this in his name?
    Or
    Is it both?

    an ancient fire temple ruins at naghshe rostam

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  • vahiddavoodi's Profile Photo

    "When we mention Persia or Persian Empire...

    by vahiddavoodi Updated May 30, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: "When we mention Persia or Persian Empire, we mean Iran after 559 BC, & by no means, it is necessarily wrong to say so.
    So from 559 BC a beginning by Cyrus until 650 BC an end by Yazdgird III, The First Imperial Era has lasted. Despite all the braveries of Iranians including Yazdgird III & Ahura bless his great spirit Arteshbod "Rostam-e Farokhzad" head of Persian forces & the Grand General in charge of the defense of Ctesiphone, the great Sassanid Capital near Baghdad, Iran had lost the war. This was due to 60 years of war with Rome & Roman Empire, which had weakened the Persian Empire economically, militaristically, & spiritually. Another reason for this lost was the ever expanding distance between the social classes, unhappy lower classes, elite corrupt power of some Zoroastrian Clerics (Moobed & Moobede Moobedan), & last but not least "The Persian Traitors" & Infidels who always betrayed Iran & spied for Rome or Arabs. Persian Traitors were many low lives who sold Iran by the pound, & they are still doing it as of now!

    rostam farokhzad,general arteshbod sassanid

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  • vahiddavoodi's Profile Photo

    THE PERSIAN (IRANIAN,PARTHIAN) EMPIRE ...

    by vahiddavoodi Written May 17, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: the persian (iranian,parthian) empire was a facinating periode of persian history closely connected to grecce and rome.
    the persian empire revived the greatness of the achaemenid empire and counter balanced rome's,turkmenistan,afghanistan,tajikistan,pakistan,syria,lebonan,jordan,palastine and israel and contained portions of what are now modern iraq,turkey,armenia,azerbaijan and pakistan taht fell under persian rule.
    the achaemenids ruled iran from 550 b.c to 330 b.c and their authority extended from the danube river to the indus river it's zenith.

    map of iranian empire

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  • Krystynn's Profile Photo

    Krystynn's General Tip

    by Krystynn Written Sep 12, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory:

    Above: A 'live' webcam view of the WESTERN WALL, Jerusalem, (also known as the WAILING WALL...). Image updates automatically every 60 seconds...

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  • seagoingJLW's Profile Photo

    VISIT the PYRAMIDS and the...

    by seagoingJLW Written Sep 7, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: VISIT the PYRAMIDS and the SPHINX. There is nothing like it in the world. Standing there is an unbelievable experience.

    Visit Petra in Jordan.

    Visit everything in Israel

    Fondest memory: There is nothing quite like standing at the Western Wall in old Jerusalem.

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  • Visit United Arab Emirates as...

    by Zakki Written Sep 7, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Visit United Arab Emirates as it is the shopping center on the Middel East. People there are Friendly and hospitable. The city is on the move all the time and there are changes to the city continously for the better of the city.

    Fondest memory: The Mountains of the Emirates

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Private Tuition

    by maykal Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Private tuition is another option, although you can't get residence visas in either Syria or Yemen this way. In Damascus, I found a teacher in the Palestinian 'Camp' (Mukhayyim) area, and I generally paid S£500 (about US$10) for a two-hour lesson. This is probably the best way to learn a dialect.

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Alternative schools in Sana'a

    by maykal Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS IN SANA'A. The Yemen Language Center used to have a good reputation, but recently it has had financial problems and the quality of teaching has plummeted. I met a few students from that institute, and none of them were happy with the course. When I went to look round it, I didn't hear a word spoken in Arabic - in fact it was almost like a piece of America. A Yemeni friend who came with me had to wait at the gate - not encouraging, how can you learn a language if isolated from native speakers?!
    Prices are high (US$800 for 6 weeks of classes) but apparently negotiable!!!
    CALES (Centre for Arabic Language and Eastern Studies in the heart of the old city is supposed to be very good, but the old city is such a rabbit warren that I never found the place!
    For Muslims, there are some courses at the universities in Sana'a, and these are free, but class sizes are huge (50+)

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Sana'a Institute for Arabic language, Sana'a

    by maykal Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The Sana'a Institute for Arabic Language, surprisingly enough in Sana'a, Yemen, is much a much better place to learn Arabic than the Institute in Damascus. It is more expensive though. For a start, they limit classes to 6 students, although if there is no suitable class, you can have private tuition. You can choose how many hours you want to study per month (40, 80 or 120....that's roughly 2, 4 or 6 hours per day) and you can choose between having one or two teachers. The best thing though, is the fact that you can study things you are interested in, and they teach Fusha Arabic as well as Yemeni dialects (mostly Sana'ani). They are also fairly flexible when it comes to holidays - you choose your own!

    Fondest memory: Classes can be as early as 8am or as late as 6pm - it's up to you and your teacher to choose a time. Fridays are holidays, and some teachers like to keep Thursdays free to chew qat (see my Yemen page for more on qat!).
    They have a whole range of prices, so I'll just give an example - For 4 hours per day(80 hours in a month) private tuition it costs US$495, and in a class it costs US$285.
    They can also provide accommodation on one of two renovated houses in the old city. If you don't like passport offices, the institute can handle all the paperwork for visas, travel permits, etc. for a small fee.

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Arabic Teaching Institute for Foreigners, Damascus

    by maykal Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: In Damascus, I studied at the Arabic Teaching Institute for Foreigners,(known as 'the Mahad') which has quite a bad reputation as it is a fairly boring place to study. It is run like a primary school, complete with bells and black marks for being late, but this is ridiculous as the average age of students is about 30. They teach only Fusha (Modern Standard Arabic) which is the language used in newspapers, literature, and on news broadcasts, but not much use when haggling over carpets. Dialect is forbidden in the classroom! Classes are normally large, limiting speaking in class, but students come from all over the world - not everyone speaks English, so the only way to talk to anyone is through Arabic which speeds up the learning process. The institute's own textbooks are dire, no pictures, and all texts seem to do nothing but praise Syria (In 8 months, we studied the selected history of Syria, the ruins of Syria, the supposed lack of pollution in Syria etc...). However, the course is very good for learning grammar thoroughly.

    Fondest memory: Lessons start at 9am, continuaing until noon with half an hour break at 10:30. Fridays and Sundays are holidays. The Institute observes both Muslim and Christian holidays, and a whole host of national holidays.
    Other than language classes, the institute runs a few day trips to museums in Damascus, as well as some longer outings to Palmyra, Crac des Chevaliers and the coast. These are done in a decrepit old bus, and are usually accompanied by very loud music.
    Studying at this institute is one of the only ways of getting a residence visa for Syria, and the first couple of days after registration are spent running between various ministeries with an armful of papers collecting signatures. They have classes for beginners, up to advanced level, and to become a Syrian citizen or enrol for a degree course at a Syrian university, you need to take the final course and exam to get the appropriate certificate. This is why the classes have such a wide range of language ability, as some people have lived in Syria for years, speak fluent Arabic, but need the certificate as a formality only! Another reason for the range of levels in one class is the joke that is the placement test. It is quite an ordeal (written and oral exams), yet the results don't seem to be taken into account when placing students in classes...if you take the test early on in the registration period, you'll be put in a suitable class, but if you do it later then you'll be bunged in any class with a spare seat. So near-beginners end up in the advanced class, while fluent speakers have to sit through excruciatingly slow lessons about the letters of the alphabet!
    I would imagine, the beginners'classes are quite difficult as no language other than Arabic is used in class, although the beginners I met seemed to pick up Arabic fairly fast despite a confusing first few weeks.
    For a course (Winter from Sept-May, Summer from June-August, same price) it costs US$450 for 'Westerners', US$200 for those from "elsewhere".

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad

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