Mts'khet'a Local Customs

  • Natakhtari Beer
    Natakhtari Beer
    by HORSCHECK
  • Georgian cash point
    Georgian cash point
    by HORSCHECK
  • Churchkhela for sale in Mtskheta, Georgia
    Churchkhela for sale in Mtskheta,...
    by SWFC_Fan

Most Recent Local Customs in Mts'khet'a

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    No letterboxes

    by HORSCHECK Written Jul 12, 2014

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    Georgian Post
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    My plan was to send some postcards from Georgia, but already in Tbilisi I didn't see any letter boxes in the town and even post offices were hard to find. So when I came to Mtshketa I went to the small post office, which was marked on my city map.

    Although there was a signpost in front of the building directing towards the post office, there wasn't any lettering on the building façade marking it as post office. At first I took the wrong entry until a local showed me the right one somewehere at the side of building.

    I came into a corridor which looked like every other corridor in a residential building. Still for me it was not clear where the post office was, but the friendly local led me to a door, which again wasn't marked as post office. If I had been by myself I probably wouldn't have found it as quickly as with the helpf of the local.

    With my basic Russian I finally got what I wanted, although the ladies in charge were quite happy to practise their English with me.

    After I had written my postcard somewhere in the town I got back to the post office to post it, as there actually weren't any letter boxes in town.

    Directions:
    Mtskheta's Post Office can be found at the crossing of the streets Agmashenebeli and Gamsakhurdia near the south eastern corner of the old town.

    Address: Post Office, Agmashenebeli str. 84, 3300 Mtskheta

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    Natakhtari Beer

    by HORSCHECK Updated Jul 12, 2014

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    Natakhtari Beer

    Georgia is especially popular for its wine, as it is said to be one of the oldest wine producing countries. Still as I am more of a beer driner I mainly tried their different local beers.

    Quite often I drank a Natakhtari beer, which seems to be one of the leading beer brands in Georgia. It is brewed in the village Natakhtari somewhere north of Mtskheta. The company was founded in 1995 and later acquired by the Turkish Efes brewery. Besides beer, Natakhtari also produces the famous Georgian lemonade.

    Website: http://www.natakhtari.com/

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    Local currency: Georgian Lari

    by HORSCHECK Written Jul 12, 2014

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    Georgian cash point
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    Like many other former Soviet Republics, also Georgia is a country of cash, which means that credit cards are not as widely accepted as in Western Europe.

    The local currency of Georgia is the Georgian Lari (GEL), which exists in its current form since about 1995. The subunits of the Geogrian Laris are Tetri, so 1 Lari is divided into 100 Tetri.

    I got my Georgian Lari from cash points (ATM), which are widely available in bigger cities. Even in Mtskheta's town centre I found at least 3 cash points just around the Svetitskhoveli Cathedral.

    I saw many Exchange Offices in Tbilisi, but don't remember seeing one in Mtskheta.

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    Churchkhela - the "Georgian Snickers"

    by SWFC_Fan Written Mar 23, 2013

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    Churchkhela for sale in Mtskheta, Georgia

    A popular sweet snack in Georgia is Churchkhela.

    Nicknamed the "Georgian Snickers", Churchkhela is a string of nuts covered in a thickened sweet grape juice with a slightly rubbery texture.

    You will find them hanging outside many shops or being sold at markets, from stalls in the streets or by elderly ladies in underpasses. When they are hanging together, they resemble sausages hanging outside a butcher's shop. You will find them in various shades of brown, red and black.

    I tried Churchkhela a couple of times during our visit to Georgia in February 2013. First, I was given a piece to sample at "Coffee House" cafe in Tbilisi and then I bought a full one from a lady at a stall outside Svetitskhoveli Cathedral in Mtskheta.

    We paid 3 GEL (£1.20) for the Churchkhela in Mtskheta and another 3 GEL for a folded sheet of grape candy, similar to the exterior of the Churchkhela but thinner. I suspect we were overcharged – not least because the lady we bought them from gave us a couple of complimentary smaller Churchkhela when we walked past her again a short while later!

    They are very nice. If I lived in Georgia (or one of the other countries in eastern Europe and the Middle East that sell similar products), I would happily eat them as an alternative to chocolate bars.

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    Electric meters

    by JLBG Written Oct 30, 2011

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    Electric meters

    Another feature unknown in Western Europe is about electric meters : instead of being inside each house (or each building), it is directly affixed on the electric poles. I have seen that everywhere in Georgia and this is not special to Mstkheta.

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    Butcher’s

    by JLBG Written Oct 30, 2011

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    The butcher’s is very different of what we are used to see in Western Europe. It is more a booth that a shop. There does not seem to be any fridge : the meat proposed in the morning has to be sold before the end of the afternoon.

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    Weddings and baptisms are the rage

    by Assenczo Updated Aug 23, 2010
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    On Saturday the old capital was flooded by people in gowns and fancy dresses. They did not appear to be tightening the knot there but for sure they received some blessings. The cacophony was fed by another stream of festivities - baptisms. The fortunate babies were striped and bathed in views of the relatives till they felt the union with the right God.

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Mts'khet'a Local Customs

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