T'bilisi Things to Do

  • Carving around main door
    Carving around main door
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  • Samegrelo house (19th century)
    Samegrelo house (19th century)
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  • Kikodzis kucha
    Kikodzis kucha
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Most Recent Things to Do in T'bilisi

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    Cemetery like no other

    by Assenczo Updated May 21, 2014

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    The so called, Pantheon of Georgian artistic colossi, is located midway up one of the hills which makes it difficult to reach on foot. Even though on a map it looks as if the funicular is close and might have a stop it does not. Even a taxi ride will not save you from a steep climb since the road is closed half way up (just for the mortals). The cemetery contains graves of famous people of the arts but it seems to have been started as a resting place for the Russian Governor of the Southern Caucasus, Griboedov. The poor fellow received a promotion in the diplomatic ranks by being sent to Teheran where in very familiar to us fashion was killed by a politically motivated mob. It becomes even more interesting when one realises that along with famous men of the letters like Ilya Chavchavadze there is the grave of his modern colleague (kind of) Zviad Gamsahurdia who was the first president of independent Georgia as well. Something went terribly wrong with his politicking and he ended up dead. The rumour has it that it had to do with his lack of understanding of the Caucasus puzzle which is a puzzle in itself since he is from there and with sharpened sensitivities as any other artiste. So we have the promoter of the empire and one of its staunchest enemies within meters of each other.

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    Cool Off on a Hot Summer Day at Tbilisi Sea Club

    by Hanka Updated Oct 3, 2013
    The kiddie pool at the Tbilisi Sea Club
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    If you're in town during the summer long enough to enjoy a day at the pool, one of the choices you have is going to Tbilisi Sea Club, also known as the Tbilisi Yacht Club. It is located on the southern shore of the "Tbilisi Sea". It costs about 15 GEL per person (kids under five or so get in for free) and parking is free. They have two deep pools plus one for toddlers with it's own small water slide. They have a playground, a cafe (drinks only) and a restaurant (limited menu), detached restrooms with plumbing, a large floating suntan platform with diving boards, hillside waterslides for older kids, and watercraft rentals. There are hundreds of lounge chairs, and shade umbrellas are available for rent at 5 GEL. One hour rental of a kayak is 10 GEL for one person, 15 GEL for two people. One lap around the lake on a water ski costs 15 GEL. For 50-120 GEL you can rent a whole yacht for one to three hours. On the weekend it is sure to be crowded, but during the week during the work hours it is peaceful and under-populated. The Tbilisi Sea Club is definately not as fancy as the GINO Paradise Aqua Park, but it definately is more affordable.

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    Georgia's newest aqua park, GINO Paradise Tbilisi

    by Hanka Updated Sep 22, 2013
    The climbing wall at the end of the wave pool.
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    It is so awesome that this park has come to Tbilisi. It had a soft opening in August 2013 allowing people to enjoy a handfull of awesome water slides, a wave pool with a climbing wall at the deep end and zero-depth entry for little kids, a lazy river that they call a "wild river" (bring your own floating devices), a rope challenge course (with helmets and safety harnesses), sand volleyball and football (soccer) fields, hundreds of lounge chairs, and a few restaurant/cafes and bars.

    While most of the outdoor stuff is completed, the two buildings with indoor pools are still under construction.

    Ticket pricing is complicated. You can pay for a few hours or for the whole day, there are different prices according to your age, and what parts you plan to visit. Meals are not included: you can pay for an all-you-can-eat buffet or buy fast food items.

    Before the end of 2013, the spa and wellness section will open. When it does open, it's going to be fabulous. I've been to the spa at Hotel GINO Wellness Rabati, so I know that GINO Paradise really is going to be a paradise when it comes to saunas. It will be such a welcome relief from the winter weather. The saunas that this company constructs are beautiful, high-tech, and whimsical.

    Sometime next year they will open their on-site hotel and beachfront property. It will be the place to be in Tbilisi, and will probably steal some tourists away from Batumi.

    I included a couple of photos, but unfortunately my battery died, so that's all I have.

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    Places to see...

    by littlebush Written Sep 6, 2013

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    Theres quite a bit to see but can be done in a day...

    -The old town - jsut get yourself lost and walk around the old back streets and admire the old buildings
    -Nariqata Fortress - walk up the hill to the fortress, free entry for great views of this historic city
    -Mother Georgia (Kartlis Deda) monument - just along from the fortress, mother georgia stands proud with her sword to fend off enemies and her wine as a gift for visitors.
    -The old clock tower - an old wonky tower being propped by a steel beam, great for a few pics
    -The peace bridge - walk along the new modern looking bridge
    -Rike park-beautiful landscaped gardens near the bridge and Presential palace
    -Tsminda Semeba cathedral - huge catherdral standing proud overlooking much of the city, free entry. Nothing much inside but a great spot for peace and quiet
    -The history museum - which was 5 Lari to get in, and has a section called the 'Soviet occupation' was very interesting
    -Mtatsminda plateau, 3 Lari return on the funicular railway is a fun place more for kids (with fun fair rides etc) but also has come cafes and bars and superb views of the city

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    Mziuri Park for young children

    by Hanka Written Aug 4, 2013
    A playground at Mziuri Park, Vake, Tbilisi Georgia
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    There's not too many things for little kids to do in Tbilisi, so if you're here and you have little ones who need to burn off some energy, here is a park they should enjoy playing at. In this park there are several playgrounds, so if one doesn't catch your interest you can stroll over to another one. In the summer there are lots of shade trees to rest or picnic under. Also, this park is not far from the Tbilisi Zoo.

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    Bathhouse #5

    by Hanka Updated Apr 25, 2013

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    Front entrance to Bathhouse No. 5.
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    Bathhouse #5 is nearly 300 years old and Tbilisi's oldest bathhouse. It is located right next to the garden park. It has private rooms that are available 24/7 and priced at 35, 50, 70 and 80 GEL/hour. The more expensive rooms come with a sauna, and hot and cold showers and pools. It also has a communal public bath, segregated by gender, which is open 7:00 AM to 9:00 PM. It costs 2 GEL for men, and 3 GEL for women. Scrub massages are 10 GEL. As you check in at the front desk, you can purchase bottles of beer, soda, and water, and some items you may have forgotten, like slippers, towels, razors, soap, etc. The water here is reportedly much hotter here than other baths at other places. One drawback is that it has squatty potties.

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    The bathhouse called "Sulphur Bath"

    by Hanka Written Apr 25, 2013

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    The entrance to "Sulphur Bath" is tucked back from Abano Street, across the creek, between two buildings but clearly identified by a billboard-type advertisement (see photo). The door is a simple grey steel door, directly to the right of the poster. This bathhouse is open 24/7 and offers only private rooms; about three to four of them. The smaller rooms are 30 GEL per hour and the larger rooms 40 GEL. They told me the scrub massage was 20 GEL, but I thought that was too high. They have Western bathrooms. As you check in at the front desk, you can purchase bottles of beer, soda, and water, and some items you may have forgotten, like slippers, towels, razors, soap, etc. If you go, I think you should spend the extra 10 GEL and get the more expensive room; it was much more appealing than the smaller room.

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    Royal Bath (Samefo Abano)

    by Hanka Updated Apr 25, 2013
    The entrance to Royal Bath.
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    For those of you who are squeemish about public nudity, Royal Bath may be the bathhouse for you: it has only private rooms. Prices range between 40 and 80 GEL and a scrub massage costs 10 GEL. The 40 GEL room has a bath large enough for about two people. The 80 GEL room is large enough for 10 people, has two marble tables, steam bath room, a private changing room, and a relaxation room with a couch, leather sofas. The bath is in a separate room and includes a spacious hot bath, a basin filled with cold water, and a shower. Their toilets are Western. Many of the rooms are coated in royal blue tile, giving the rooms a blue hue. As you check in at the front desk, you can purchase bottles of beer, soda, and water, and some items you may have forgotten, like slippers, towels, razors, soap, etc. Royal Bath is open seven days a week, 8:00 AM to midnight. Of all the baths I checked out, I think I prefered Royal Bath.

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    Take the Funicular to Mtatsminda Park.

    by Hanka Updated Mar 31, 2013

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    Lower station of the Tbilisi Funicular.
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    Tbilisi's completely refurbished funicular re-opened in December 2012 on the tracks of the old one. The lower station is located on Daniel Chonqadze Street, right across from Vilnius Square, which has a playground for little kids. (The station looks like a mosque.) The two funicular cars are counterbalanced and run on the same track. They meet in the middle where the track splits apart and reconnects like a zipper at a half-way station (not currently offered as a stop). The trip up/down the mount is steep but only takes about five minutes to traverse. The cars are brand new, clean, heated in winter and offer a fantastic view of the city. The upper station (being refurbished in 2012-2013) is the large building at the at the top of Mtatsminda Mount overlooking central Tbilisi at the east end of Mtatsminda Park. Hours of operation are from 11:00 AM to 7:00 PM every day. Cost is 2 GEL per person per one-way ride. Children under the age of six ride for free. You must first buy a plastic card for 1 GEL and load enough money on in it to cover everyone in your group. The card is actually a Bombora Park farecard and may be used to pay for amusement rides as well.

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    Mtatsminda Park

    by SWFC_Fan Updated Mar 23, 2013

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    Mtatsminda Park, Tbilisi
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    We visited Mtatsminda Park one afternoon during our stay in Tbilisi in February 2013.

    We arrived at this mountain-top amusement park via the newly-renovated and re-opened Mtatsminda Funicular, which transported us up the mountain in 5 minutes for a cost of 2 GEL (£0.80) each.

    At the lower station of the funicular, we purchased a card onto which we could load credit. We could then use this credit to ride on the funicular and to use the rides and attractions within the park itself.

    It was a weekday afternoon in February and, as such, the park was deserted and bleak looking. I'm sure it's a much busier and happier place on a sunny summer weekend. As it was, there were no more than a dozen visitors in the entire park and we were heavily outnumbered by security staff.

    From the top station of the funicular we walked past the imposing television tower which stands tall above the city of Tbilisi and looks very impressive when lit up on top of the mountain at night. It looked less impressive close up on a grey afternoon. We couldn't even go inside the tower to take in the views over Tbilisi as it isn't open to the public.

    Next, we passed a fenced off field that contained a number of dinosaur sculptures, before arriving at a carousel ride that was being repaired/reconstructed.

    There were a few other rides in a similar state of disrepair, and not a great deal was open. Even the park's much-heralded rollercoaster wasn't running.

    However, one ride that was operating was the park's giant ferris wheel. It is perched on the edge of the mountain and affords breathtaking views over the city. It also cost us just 2 GEL (£0.80) each to go on it (and not 5.50 GEL each as our Lonely Planet guidebook suggested; but maybe it's more expensive at busier times of the year).

    Emma was a bit reluctant to go on it, but I managed to talk her into it. With hindsight, perhaps I shouldn't have, because the experience of the ferris wheel ride will live with us for years to come!

    We had seen the wheel rotating and noticed that there were no passengers on board and all the doors were open on the carriages. As we approached, the staff began to close the doors on the unused carriages. We sat in a carriage and our door was closed for us. I noticed a missing bolt on the carriage in front and the worryingly large amount of rust on the framework. I didn't mention it to Emma. I didn't need to mention the noise to Emma as she could hear it herself; a constant series of squeaks and groans as the wheel turned slowly and we laboured towards the top. I never felt particularly comfortable and a number of thoughts were going through my head as I tried to appreciate the amazing views over Tbilisi several hundred metres below:

    - was the wheel built by the same workmen who had built the buildings that were now crumbling and collapsing in Tbilisi's old town?

    - how much maintenance work could the park afford to carry out on the wheel, considering that we were the only passengers on the wheel all day and we'd only paid 2 GEL each for the pleasure?!

    - did our carriage have a missing bolt like the one in front?

    In spite of these fears, I kept trying to admire the views over the park and out across the city. I was relieved when we passed over the top of the wheel and we were on our way down again. Only a few minutes and we'd be back safely on terra firma.

    Wrong!

    We'd completed nearly 75% of the rotation (somewhere between the 2 and 3 on a clock face) when we suddenly came to a halt. We could see that the staff had finished closing all the doors and we wondered if this stop was a brief one before the wheel kicked into action at a faster pace. A few minutes passed and there was still no movement. We then started to wonder if the staff had forgotten that we were on board. Perhaps they'd finished closing all the doors and decided they'd call it a day considering it wasn't very busy. No. Surely not? Surely they'd remember the fact that a couple of passengers had finally got on board? There certainly didn't seem to be any urgency at ground level. Nobody was looking up at us or shouting reassurances that this was just a brief technical issue.

    We'd been stationary for around 5 minutes and panic was starting to kick in. Emma started shouting. We banged on the windows; hopefully hard enough to get somebody's attention, but not hard enough to cause our carriage to rock too violently. Eventually, a security guard heard us and walked up to the ride's control centre to inform the staff of our plight. A few minutes later he walked off again, giving us a thumbs up gesture as he did so.

    But still we weren't moving. However, we could hear an alarm ringing. It seems that the staff were trying (and failing miserably!) to restart the wheel. We heard the alarm again. And again. A few minutes later, another staff member, with a mobile phone to his ear, came running towards the ride to offer his assistance. Another ringing alarm. Eventually, probably 25 minutes after we'd originally stopped, the wheel jolted back into life and we were back on the ground a few minutes later.

    Relieved to be back at ground level, we jumped off the wheel and headed for the exit. The staff offered no sort of apology or explanation, they just smiled at us.

    After our ferris wheel ride from hell, we made our way to the park's "Imeruli Ezo" restaurant, where we sat by a warm fire, ate hearty Georgian food and enjoyed a much-needed beer!

    Mtatsminda Park is probably a much livelier place in the summer months, but I wouldn't rush to go back on a weekday afternoon in February. And I'd probably give the ferris wheel a miss next time. Emma certainly would!

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    Georgian National Museum

    by SWFC_Fan Written Mar 20, 2013

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    Georgian National Museum, Tbilisi
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    We visited the Georgian National Museum during our stay in Tbilisi in February 2013.

    This large museum, with exhibits on three floors, is located on busy Rustaveli Avenue, just a few minutes walk from Freedom Square (Tavisupleba Moedani).

    Tickets to enter the museum were just 5 GEL (£2) per person and this proved to be very good value for money.

    We started our exploration of the museum on the ground floor. There was a large room featuring photographs from the National Geographic archives of Tbilisi and other areas of Georgia between the years of 1908 and 1942. All of the photos were black and white and featured an interesting mix of people, landscapes and street scenes. The historic photos of Tbilisi were particularly interesting. Each of the photos contained a caption beneath it (in both Georgian and English) detailing where and when the photo was taken and who it was taken by.

    Next, we dropped down a floor to the museum's much heralded Archaelogical Treasury; a room filled with gold and silver items dating from the 3rd millennium B.C. to the 4th century A.D, and all discovered on Georgian territory. I must confess that this kind of exhibit doesn't really excite me very much, so we quickly rushed around the display cases that were showcasing mainly jewellery and plaques. Despite my lack of interest, I was impressed by some of the ornately designed items, such as the golden ducks and eagles that would have been used to decorate garments.

    We then caught a lift up to the museum's top floor where the other two exhibits were housed.

    First, we visited the temporary exhibition entitled "New Life of Oriental Collections". This room featured a collection of artwork and artefacts from Asia and the Middle East; paintings from Iran and China, armour from Japan, swords from Turkey, ornaments and decorations from Afghanistan and Tibet and an Egyptian mummy.

    Finally, we visited the "Museum of the Soviet Occupation 1921-1991". It was appropriately housed in a dark room with a sombre atmosphere. Exhibits were displayed chronologically around the edge of the room and included lists of prominent figures killed during the occupation, statistics on the number of casualties during the occupation and photos of the destruction that occurred (for example the destruction of Kutaisi Cathedral by the Bolsheviks).

    The ground floor of the museum includes a luggage storage area and souvenir shops.

    Photography is permitted throughout the entire museum.

    Overall, we spent a little over an hour inside the Georgian National Museum and found it to be a well presented museum with some fairly interesting exhibits. It wasn't spectacularly interesting or educational, but with tickets costing just 5 GEL we had no complaints.

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    Bathhouse Number 5 (Sulphur Baths)

    by SWFC_Fan Written Mar 19, 2013

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    Bathhouse Number 5, Tbilisi
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    The city of Tbilisi is renowned for its sulphur baths.

    There are several bathing complexes located in the city's Abanotubani district, just a short walk from the square of Meidan, on the opposite bank of the river from Metekhi Church. You'll recognise the bath district by the brick domes that house the baths, with steam pluming out of the top of them. You'll probably catch the odd whiff of sulphur too!

    Unfortunately, when we visited in February 2013, the Orbeliani Baths (the most visually attractive from the outside with its blue tiled facade, and reputedly offering the most authentic experience inside) were closed for refurbishments.

    This was a shame, but we were still able to visit the Royal Bath and Bathhouse Number 5 during our stay in the city.

    We visited Bathhouse Number 5 one evening during our stay, having already visited the neighbouring Royal Bath on a previous evening.

    Our visit to the Royal Bath was a fairly luxurious one. We hired a large private room, with a huge bath and a comfortable dressing room and relaxation area. Our visit to Bathhouse Number 5, by comparison, was much less salubrious...but also significantly cheaper.

    The large private room at the Royal Bath cost 80 GEL (£32) per hour (we later visited the Royal Bath for a second time and paid 50 GEL for a smaller room), whereas the small private room at Bathhouse Number 5 cost just 35 GEL (£14) per hour. We could have paid a fraction of that price for a communal bath, but opted for a private room instead. We took our own towels along with us, but could have hired them for a small charge.

    While the rooms at the Royal Bath had comfortable relaxation rooms with leather sofas and en-suite toilet facilities, the relaxation rooms at Bathhouse Number 5 were less luxurious, with plastic furniture, tatty sofas and squat toilets.

    As for the bath itself, it was much hotter than the ones at the Royal Bath. It was quite painful to get into and too hot to stay in for too long. Unlike the baths at Royal Bath, where we could soak in them for long periods of time, we found ourselves dipping in and out of the bath at Bathhouse Number 5 for just a few minutes at a time, before retreating to the relaxation room to cool off.

    After our hour in the bath, we were glad to get back outside into the cool night air. We sat for a while in the adjacent Heydar Aliyev Adina Park while we cooled off and then went to a nearby cafe where I enjoyed a cool bottle of Nabeghlavi salty mineral water.

    The baths at Bathhouse Number 5 probably provide a more authentic and local experience than the ones at Royal Bath, but if you want more comfort it is worthwhile spending a few extra Lari for one of the private rooms at Royal Bath.

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    Royal Bath (Sulphur Baths)

    by SWFC_Fan Written Mar 19, 2013

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    Large private room at The Royal Bath, Tbilisi
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    The city of Tbilisi is renowned for its sulphur baths.

    There are several bathing complexes located in the city's Abanotubani district, just a short walk from the square of Meidan, on the opposite bank of the river from Metekhi Church. You'll recognise the bath district by the brick domes that house the baths, with steam pluming out of the top of them. You'll probably catch the odd whiff of sulphur too!

    Unfortunately, when we visited in February 2013, the Orbeliani Baths (the most visually attractive from the outside with its blue tiled facade, and reputedly offering the most authentic experience inside) were closed for refurbishments.

    This was a shame, but we were still able to visit the Royal Bath and Bathhouse Number 5 during our stay in the city.

    We visited the Royal Bath on two occasions. Unlike the other bathing complexes, Royal Bath doesn't offer communal baths, only private rooms. This was fine by us; we'd already decided that we'd prefer our own room rather than individual male and female baths. The rooms at Royal Bath are more luxurious (and expensive) than at either of the neighbouring complexes.

    Our first visit to Royal Bath was late in the evening. We discovered that the baths were open until 11:00pm so we arrived at 10:00pm for the last hour of the night. At first, we were told that the large room (80 GEL / £32 per hour) was unavailable as it had already been reserved. So, instead, we were shown a smaller room that cost 40 GEL (£16) per hour.

    The small room included a small bath (which would have been adequate for the two of us) and one marble bed (which would have been used if we had opted for a massage or treatment).

    As we were viewing the small room, we were informed that the other party hadn't shown up so we could hire the large room instead if we wished. We had a look at it and it was much more spacious, with a bath that could have comfortably accommodated 10 people, as well as two marble beds, showers and ornately tiled walls. It was a bit excessive for 2 people, and would have been ideal for a larger group, but we decided to splash out and hire it.

    As well as the steam bath room, we also got a private dressing room area (with wooden benches and a selection of footwear to use) and a relaxation area with leather chairs and sofas and an en-suite toilet. No towels were provided (we'd pre-empted this and taken our own along) and we were offered the chance to buy refreshments (bottled mineral water for 1 GEL, although we could have had beer instead) before we locked ourselves away in our private enclave.

    The staff asked us a few times if we wanted massages or treatments. We weren't interested, and we didn't enquire about the prices. We just wanted to soak in the hot sulphur bath. I'm not sure whether the massages/treatments would have taken place during the hour than we had paid for or whether they would have taken place after our hour in the bath.

    On our second visit to the Royal Bath, again late in the evening after a day of sightseeing, we hired a smaller room for 50 GEL (£20) per hour. While it was significantly smaller than the room we had hired on our previous visit, it was much bigger than the small (40 GEL) room that we had viewed on our first visit. The bath itself wasn't much smaller than the one in the large room (it was more than big enough for the two of us). The room only contained one marble bed. The relaxation area wasn't quite as plush as the one attached to the more expensive room, but it still contained comfy leather sofas and toilet facilities.

    On our second visit to the Royal Bath, Emma took along soap and a sponge and we were able to perform DIY body scrubs on each other rather than pay for the treatments offered by the baths!

    In between our visits to the Royal Bath we had visited neighbouring Bathhouse Number 5 one evening. There we paid 35 GEL (£14) for a small room for an hour. It was comparable in size to the 40 GEL room that we had viewed at Royal Bath, but was not as salubrious. The relaxation area contained tatty furniture and a squat toilet. The bath itself was also painfully hot and less relaxing than the ones at Royal Bath. I'd recommend paying a few extra Lari for the added comfort offered at the Royal Bath.

    A relaxing soak in a hot sulphur bath – the ideal way to wind down after a busy day of sightseeing! A must-do while in Tbilisi!

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    Rezo Gabriadze Clock Tower

    by SWFC_Fan Written Mar 13, 2013

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    Rezo Gabriadze Clock Tower, Tbilisi
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    The extremely quirky Rezo Gabriadze Clock Tower is located in Tbilisi's old town – although the tower itself is only a few years old (completed in 2011).

    The tower is attached to the Tbilisi Marionette Theatre, on Shavteli Street, and was hand built by Rezo Gabriadze (a film director / artist / puppeteer) using materials that he salvaged from the streets of Tbilisi. As such, it contains an eclectic mix of Byzantine columns, colourfully painted tiles and a variety of different types of bricks.

    The tower is four storeys tall, very lopsided and looks as though it could topple over at any moment. A large steel girder is propped up against the wall of the tower, giving the impression that it is there to prevent the tower from falling over. Completing the unusual appearance of the tower, the rooftop contains a living pomegrante tree.

    We visited the tower a few times during our stay in Tbilisi in February 2013. Our first visit coincided with the clock striking 7:00pm. As it did so, a window near the top of the tower opened and a winged angel figure emerged onto a balcony. The angel struck the bell seven times with a small hammer. Then, a musical lullaby played while another panel, further down the tower, opened up and displayed a series of characters on a carousel. As the music played, the carousel rotated and provided us with a short play. At the time, we didn't know what the play was. I have subsequently read that it is called "Circle of Life", shows a couple getting married, having a child and ultimately dying, and features puppets from Rezo Gabriadze's own sketches.

    It was purely by chance that we were there at 7:00pm to witness this play. It was only after returning home from Tbilisi that I learnt that the play only occurs twice each day; at 12:00 noon and 7:00pm. It is worth timing your visit to coincide with one of these times.

    On another day, we saw the clock strike 3:00pm. The little angel appeared on the top balcony and struck the bell three times, but that was the end of the show; there was no play at that time of day.

    An impressively quirky clock tower in Tbilisi's old town. A "must see" while in the city!

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    Cable car: Rike Park to Nariqala Fortress

    by SWFC_Fan Updated Feb 24, 2013

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    Cable car over Tbilisi old town
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    The cable car ride from Rike Park to the hilltop Nariqala Fortress opened in the summer of 2012.

    We took several rides on the cable car during our stay in Tbilisi in February 2013.

    Unlike some cable cars I've been on in other cities, the Tbilisi version is incredibly good value for money. To ride the cable car you must first purchase a Metromoney card (it's the same card that is used on the city's Metro network) and top it up with credit. The initial purchase of the card is 2 GEL (£0.80) and one card can be shared between several people. Once you have the card, each ride on the cable car costs just 1 GEL (£0.40) each way.

    The ride, which lasts less than 5 minutes, passes over Rike Park, the Mtkvari River and the Old Town on the way up to the fortress. On the way, you'll be treated to great views of the ultra-modern Peace Bridge, the precariously perched Metekhi Church, the hilltop Avlabari district and the bustling square of Meidan.

    From the top station, it is a short walk down the steps to the entrance of Nariqala Fortress (free entry) or a couple of minutes walk along the path in the opposite direction to the giant statue of Mother Georgia (Kartlis Deda).

    The views from the summit are breathtaking. As well as the views over the Old Town, the river and Rike Park, you can see further afield, picking out such sights as Freedom Square, the Presidential Palace and Tsminda Sameba Cathedral.

    As the cable car runs from 11:00am until 11:00pm, we were able to take a night-time ride to see the city lit up after dark...and Tbilisi is a city that looks even more stunning when it is illuminated!

    The Tbilisi cable car is an unbeatable way to enjoy the panoramic views of the city by day or by night. It is also incredibly good value at just 1 GEL (£0.40) per ride. Highly recommended!

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