Safety Tips in Georgia

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  • JohnniOmani's Profile Photo

    Danger Areas

    by JohnniOmani Written Oct 2, 2006

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    Georgia is just coming out of a very long and painful sleep but there are still places in the country are not safe for foreigners such as Abkhazia, Svaneti is bad in areas as well the obvious areas near Dagestan and Chechnya. Please use common sense when travelling to the northern areas of Georgia as I ve been told things can get out of hand in a heart beat so remember there is a fine line between being adventurous and stupid.

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  • JohnniOmani's Profile Photo

    Marshrutka madness

    by JohnniOmani Written Oct 2, 2006

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    Most of the transport in Georgia is done in one way or another by this minivans called marshrutkas and they have their good and bad points. Their good points are that they are much faster than normal buses as well as they dont stop nearly as often along the route. The bad points being that they are crammed and speed excessively running the risk of getting into an accident. Another bad point is that most of them are labelled in Georgian and they dont have shocks making for some bumpy roads. Overall, it is part of the adventure!

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  • ellielou's Profile Photo

    the Lonely Planet

    by ellielou Written Oct 26, 2006

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    I have this tip on my Tbilisi page as well. Just be aware that the LP is way, way, way off for this destination. Your best bet for travel in Georgia, is checking with VT, especially with people who live there or have just returned.

    If you want more info on this, check my Warning or Danger tip for Tbilisi....and good luck!

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    georgian roads.

    by cachaseiro Written Dec 11, 2004

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    some of the georgian roads are fine and some are in a terrible condition.
    be prepared for a bit of everything when travelling the country.
    if you travel by bicycle like me, then make sure you have good tyres.

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    • Road Trip
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  • Veroali's Profile Photo

    Traffic

    by Veroali Written Sep 10, 2011

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    I dont exactly know if this is a danger or adrenalin. Georgians drive fast and dont keep the rules so much. On the other hand i havent seen any car accidents. I guess because they dont keep the rules, they are ready for anything and they react very fast. Anyways, it is unforgettable experience.

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  • josephescu's Profile Photo

    marshrutka timetable

    by josephescu Updated Dec 3, 2006

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    Marshrutkas do not have a timetable, they only leave when full. Far from being a danger, this may mean that the departure time you’ve been told by the driver may be postponed with one or even 2 hours, should passengers fail to arrive.
    On the other hand, it may be useful you arrive at least a half an hour before the “scheduled” departure and secure a seat.

    My advice – do not plan strict schedules and always make a reasonable allowance.

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  • BenThere's Profile Photo

    Be Smart in Georgia, just like anywhere else!

    by BenThere Written Aug 22, 2004

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    To those of you considering a trip to the Republic of Georgia, I whole-heartedly encourage you to go. It is a wonderful country with a rich history and (mostly) friendly people. What I have to say here are just a few phrases concerning basic travel safety while in Georgia. Tblisi is a very wonderful city with numerous sites to see, great restaurants, tourist-friendly hotels, and wonderful people. However, be prepared to see a country that is going through some economic hardships. Chances are you will be asked for money in the streets once in a while, especially if you look remotely like a tourist. The best resource is a native Georgian friend who can help you see Georgia as it is meant to be seen!

    A little research prior to going would not hurt in order to get an idea of the way of life there, but, in all, just like anywhere else in the world, be careful. Be a smart traveler by being aware of your personal items. Don't flash cash, chances are someone will see you with it. Be careful travelling at night time, especially if you are out gallavanting and may enjoy a few too many cocktails. You can easily become a target.

    Make sure you have your Visa in order well before you go. It will save you time and money during your trip. The embassy can take a long time to process your passport.

    One of the best places to exchange money is at the Marriott hotel on Rustaveli. It is inside, trustable, and will even give you a reciept. Plus, there's air conditioning!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
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    • Archeology

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Dangerous places

    by maykal Updated Aug 26, 2002

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    Certain areas are quite dangerous, notably Abkhazia (the area around Sukhumi in the north-west of Georgia) which has effectively broken away. I was warned off visiting Svaneti and South Ossetia too, and many people told me of the dangers of travelling alone along the Georgian Military Highway to Kazbegi...but because the people from Tbilisi seem so distrustful of anywhere outside their own city, it is hard to tell if the region is really as dangerous as they say...in this case Kazbegi seemed trouble-free.
    A number of foreigners have been kidnapped in Georgia by various groups and mafia organizations (one area to steer well clear of is the Pankisi Gorge...rumoured to be a hide-out for Chechen rebels, and is completely beyond the control of the government)...while I was there, a Lebanese business man was freed after nearly three months of being a hostage.

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Traffic police, border guards and other cretins...

    by maykal Written Aug 26, 2002

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    One problem is the traffic police...they do not get paid regularly, so they have to top-up their almost non-existant salary by stopping cars for 'traffic offences'. Male drivers can't do much about this other than pay and treat it as a sort of raod tax, but female drivers are not stopped as often. My host's sister-in-law had the interesting technique of speeding through roadblocks while laughing and waving at the police as they motioned to her to stop!
    Border guards are also corrupt, although their attempts at getting money or presents is usually quite half-hearted, and they often admit openly that the money is going towards vodka and cigarettes...hide your cash, and wave a credit card or travellers' cheque at them, and you should have no problems.

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Overeating and overdrinking!!!

    by maykal Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Overeating and overdrinking!!! Georgian food is excellent, and people are very generous, so if you are invited to eat with someone, be prepared to get very full! And no meal is worth eating if it doesn't come with wine or cognac. Georgia has a tradition of toasting, and anything can be used for an excuse for a toast. There is a certain etiquette to toasting, and it is lead by the toastmaster (tamada in georgian) who proposes the toasts...guests are supposed to be quiet while he is speaking, but if he doesn't hold the guests interest, then he will barely be heard over all the talking. A second man (never a woman) will also say a few words about the same subject...and the person who is being toasted is expected to stand up and thank the toastmasters before downing his glass. A foreign guest provides a perfect subject for a toast, and you will be expected to down huge quantities of wine/cognac, which is quite difficult if you are not used to it, especially when the home-made drinks are usually extremely potent! You are not supposed to drink anything unless a toast has been proposed, so you can't really taste the wine...but make sure you use the break between toasts to fill up on food to soak up all the alcohol, or you'll soon end up like these people!

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  • vysnaite's Profile Photo

    I've talked to one acquatance...

    by vysnaite Written Aug 24, 2002

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    I've talked to one acquatance who has been there in 2000 during a couple of times. Some pics on this page is his with his permission. When I asked about the situation he answered that 'not bad.. but worse than in Russian province' .. boy, I'd say it's very bad then! :( Thus, he also said that it's beginning to improve little by little. But it's not a tourist destination anymore, people are afraid. That's what the war does.. that's what people do forgeting that war is about other people. Those who think of war never take part in it, they send others to there.. I really hope that situation stabilises and someday people living there and the city will be able to stand up firmly on feet! Picture 2000.

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  • Nyon-45's Profile Photo

    Of all the road trips I've...

    by Nyon-45 Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Of all the road trips I've made all over the world, the most dangerous one is the transfer by car from the capital city of Tbilisi and Kutaisi. No laws, no rules apply - the Georgian drivers seem to have no sense for dangerous situations at all.

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  • DAO's Profile Photo
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    EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS

    by DAO Updated Apr 24, 2011


    OK. This can be a little confusing. The Emergency Phone Numbers in Georgia are:

    Fire Department: 011

    Police: 022

    Ambulance: 033

    Alternatively you can ring 022 and speak with the Police to arrange any needed support. The Police are huge in number in this country and they always look like they are looking for something to do. Save this tip and print it off to take with you.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Business Travel
    • Backpacking

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Comments (1)

  • Jul 2, 2013 at 2:06 AM

    money exchange trap! there is a small money exchange shop in Pushikin street, (walking from freedom square, on your left hand side, about 3 minutes walk from the square), NOT the one with electronic boardi showing price, this cheating shop is just a few steps before that one). it showed very good rate in a plastic board, but when you exchange, they try to confuse you with counting non-simple numbers, and ask you to sign, then you will find they charge you 9.5 per cent for commission!!!

Georgia Warnings and Dangers

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