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Most Viewed Favorites in Iran

  • vahiddavoodi's Profile Photo

    ANCIENT MEDAL FOR ACHAEMENIDS...

    by vahiddavoodi Updated Feb 17, 2006

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    Favorite thing: you see one of the gold handmades of achaemenid's priode (550 b.c) .
    it's a medal for posting on clothes or hats and it made according to iranian art basics.
    there are many same things that are showing in museums in tehran and major cities in iran.
    for more information and enjoing go to "national mueseum of iran " in tehran.

    lion medal
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology
    • Arts and Culture

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  • vahiddavoodi's Profile Photo

    CAMPING OPPORTUNITIES IN IRAN ARE...

    by vahiddavoodi Updated Feb 17, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: camping opportunities in iran are endless.
    you can go outside of cities all over iran and reach many varied field for yourself.
    there are many activities for people who love the pure nature and mountains in iran to go and enjoy.
    many kind of animals and flowers which are unique and beautiful and new charming places.
    in shahrud's forest ,you could see many unique kinds of butterflies.

    Fondest memory: look at this picture.
    i took this picture when we were tired after camping for 3 days and hunting.
    we were above the mountain near shahrud and returning to city.

    unique view of mountains above shahrud
    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Road Trip
    • Camping

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  • mohammad58's Profile Photo

    Norooz,Iranian new year_2

    by mohammad58 Written Dec 19, 2005

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    Favorite thing: Prayer said during the Haftsin:

    ya muqallib al-qulub wa 'l-ahwal
    hawwil halina ila ahsan 'l-hal

    "O you,
    transformer of hearts and spiritual states
    make our states the loveliest of states."

    Haji Firuz (Persian Santa Claus?): Troubadours, referred to as Haji Firuz, disguise themselves with makeup and wear brightly coloured outfits of satin.
    These Haji Firuz, singing and dancing, parade as a carnival through the streets with tambourines, kettle drums, and trumpets to spread good cheer and
    the news of the coming new year.
    This tradition in English translates to "getting rid of thirteen". This fun and exciting outing
    involves all family members and is intended to end the holiday season on a relaxing and positive note. The concept of avoiding the number thirteen is
    mainly to symbolize the will and power to deal with all evil in the new year.

    An interesting ritual performed at the end of the picnic day is to throw away the "Sabze" from the "Norooz Haft Seen" table. The "sabze" is supposed to
    have collected all the sickness, pain and ill fate hiding on the path of the family throughout the coming year! Touching someone else's "sabze" on this
    thirteenth day or bringing it home is therefore not a good idea and may result in absorbing their pain and hardship.

    Another meaningful ritual performed with the dumping of the "sabze" is that young single women tie the "sabze" leave(s) prior to discarding it,
    symbolizing the wish to be tied in a marriage by the "Seezdeh Bedar" of next year! The young ladies are often heard whispering the following rhyme
    while tying the leaves:

    "Sal-e deegar, khune-yeh showhar, bacheh baghal!"
    This translates to: "Next year, in the husband's house, with a baby in arms!"

    Newly weds also tie a grass knot making wishes for a baby, a house, or whatever is on their Have-To-Have list.

    New year card Haji Firooz a graphic picture of a woman in new year
    Related to:
    • Cruise
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Singles

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  • mohammad58's Profile Photo

    Norooz,Iranian new year

    by mohammad58 Written Dec 19, 2005

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    Favorite thing: A few weeks before the New Year, Iranians clean and rearrange their homes. They make new clothes, bake pastries and germinate seeds as sign of renewal. Of course, greenery and flowers appear during the Norooz, especially the hyacinth or "sonbol." This powerfully fragrant spring flower, native to Iran, appears on the Haft Seen set at this time.
    A special cover is spread on to the Persian carpet or on a table in every Persian household. This ceremonial table is called "cloth of seven dishes," (Haft Seen) each one beginning with the Persian letter "cinn" (-- or s). The number seven has been sacred in Iran since the ancient times, and the seven dishes stand for the seven angelic heralds of life-- rebirth, health, happiness, prosperity, joy, patience, and beauty.

    The Spread of The Seven "S" 's
    (sofre-ye haft seen)
    1.Sabzeh or sprouts, usually wheat or lentil representing rebirth.
    2.Samanu is a pudding in which common wheat sprouts are transformed
    and given new life as a sweet, creamy pudding and represents the
    ultimate sophistication of Persian cooking.
    3.Sib means apple and represents health and beauty.
    4.Senjed the sweet, dry fruit of the Lotus tree, represents love.
    It has been said that when lotus tree is in full bloom,
    its fragrance and its fruit make people fall in love and become oblivious to all else.
    5.Sir which is garlic in Persian, represents medicine.
    6.Somaq sumac berries, represent the color of sunrise;
    with the appearance of the sun Good conquers Evil.
    7.Serkeh or vinegar, represents age and patience.

    Fondest memory: Other elements can include:

    a few coins placed on the sofreh represent prosperity and wealth;
    a basket of painted eggs represents fertility;
    a Seville orange floating in a bowl of water represents the earth floating in space;
    a goldfish in a bowl represents life and the end of astral year-picas;
    a flask of rose water known for its magical cleansing power, is also included on the tablecloth;
    Nearby is a brazier for burning wild rue ,a sacred herb whose smoldering fumes ward off evil spirits;
    A pot of flowering hyacinth or narcissus is also set on the sofreh;
    A mirror which represents the images and reflections of Creation as we celebrate anew the ancient Persian traditions and beliefs that creation
    took place on the first day of spring.
    On either side of the mirror are two candlesticks holding a flickering candle for each child in the family. The candles represent enlightenment
    and happiness;

    a graphic picture of a real picture of a new year card
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Cruise
    • Luxury Travel

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  • Hamid_V's Profile Photo

    The land--Iran is about three...

    by Hamid_V Updated Oct 30, 2005

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    Favorite thing: The land--Iran is about three times the size of France. It forms a large land bridge between the eastern areas of the Mediterranean and Europe with the bulk of Asia. It is divided roughly into three regions, about one half is made up of mountains ,one fourth deserts,and the remainder forests, woodlands and arable land. The diversity of the the landscape can be appreciated by driving just several hours to the north or south of Tehran. If you drive north, you cross an arid plateau up into the Alborz mountains and then you drop down into the lush forest area of the Caspian Sea. This fertile area is where one will find rice fields , tea plantations and an abundance of fruit such as melons and oranges.

    Just two hours southeast of Tehran you can be in the vast Dasht-e Kavir desert. Cities on the periphery of the deserts such as Kashan, Esfahan, Yazd and Kerman are linked by old caravan routes.

    The people--A little known fact is that Iranians are of Aryan decent and are thus closely related Europeans. In fact the name 'Iran' is a derivative of the ancient word 'Aryanam' which means 'the country of the Aryans'. Most of the people in Iran speak Persian or Farsi, the official language which is part of the Indo-European group of languages which includes English, Dutch and German. In the border areas, dialects of Turkish, Kurdish, Luri, Baluchi and Arabic are also spoken.

    It is noteworthy to mention the Iranian nomads. Iran has been influenced by nomadic tribes throughout its history. Although many have now settled in villages, there are still Qashqais ,Baktiaris, Lurs and Baluchis that still maintain their nomadic way of life. Men hunt and take care of livestock while the women weave carpets, saddlebags and tents.

    Fondest memory: Nomads generally move from one area to another by packing their belongings on
    donkeys or camels. Experiencing the lifestyle of a nomadic tribe will be an unforgettable trip back in time. You will find the nomads to be very gracious hosts. The nomads are not shy in having photos taken. The colorful clothing of the nomadic women and children are a photographers paradise.

    Iranians have an historic tradition for being friendly, considerate and most hospitable. An American friend of mine, and frequent traveler to Iran has remarked on a number of occasions how helpful Iranians are not only to
    foreigners but to other Iranians as well.

    The crime rate is very low and thus Iran is a safe place to travel. The police are generally very helpful and friendly with foreigners.

    The major concern is the traffic , which is chaotic by western standards. Getting around the country by train or bus is an option. Flights within Iran are orderly and inexpensive.
    Traveling by car with an experienced driver and competent guide who speak the language is also an option that should strongly be considered especially for those traveling to Iran for the first time.

    Hotel accomodations are hard to find during the New Year period, ( The 10 days before and after March 21st ) . Most businesses and many restaurants are closed between March 21st and March 25th. Therefore you should keep these dates in mind when making your travel plans.

    Related to:
    • Women's Travel
    • Adventure Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • joks's Profile Photo

    YADZ - bazaar

    by joks Updated Aug 16, 2005

    Favorite thing: As with all other cities in Iran, a visit to the bazaar is a must. The bazaar in Yadz is spreaded out and although not as spectacular as its cousins in Esfahan, Kashan or Tabriz still has its own distinct flair.

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  • joks's Profile Photo

    YADZ - view of city from the Sharidian

    by joks Updated Aug 16, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The best time to visit the sharidian would be sunset....( as with all other places in Yadz during high summer )....Here, you would get the most beautiful views of the city of Yadz and the surrounding mountains. It's however quite difficult to locate due to the lack of signs and the homogenous continuity of Old Yadz distinctive mud houses.

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  • joks's Profile Photo

    YADZ - badgirs

    by joks Updated Aug 16, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The brilliance of ancient technology led to the invention of the badgirs; a unique sight common only to Yadz and the surrounding cities.

    The placement of the badgirs on the roof of the house meant that they would catch any cool prevailing winds and create a natural cooling effect to the houses.

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  • joks's Profile Photo

    YADZ - entry masjid e jame

    by joks Updated Aug 16, 2005

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    Favorite thing: Personally I really did enjoy the style of this mosque as it's different to the other mosques I had seen so far. The slenderness and height of it was visually pleasing and at the same time subtle.

    Ancient Yadzi tradition meant that on a friday, unmarried (desperate or not) women would climb up to the top of the minarets and throw locks down. The man who picked the lock up would date the woman.........( I actually did witness this!!!)

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  • joks's Profile Photo

    YADZ -Amir chakmah complex

    by joks Updated Aug 16, 2005

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    Favorite thing: This wonderful complex is a gem and the best time of the day to see it is during sunset. I have forgotten the exact use of the building but it seems that it is acting as a gate since it only has a facade.

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  • joks's Profile Photo

    YADZ - ancient city

    by joks Written Aug 2, 2005

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    Favorite thing: ***As i have lost my guidebooks, its almost impossible to recall the name and places of each and every single mosque and museum.***

    I am alarmed at how fast the old town is disappearing and being "disfigured". I see at the edges of the town that the ugly concrete urban sprawl had already eaten into the old city. The over and bad restoration of buildings and houses do not help either.

    So go see them before its too late.....

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  • joks's Profile Photo

    YADZ - A living museum (almost)

    by joks Written Aug 2, 2005

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    Favorite thing: Yadz is a special special city. A very special place to slow down and relax and soak up the uniqueness of the ancient city believed to have been inhabitated for a long time ....unless it is 45 degrees outside!

    Walking around the old city, its easy to get loss within the labyrynth of mud walls and homogeneous brown of the streetscapes. Let yourself get lost (only during morning and evening hours in summer time) and soak in the details of the architecture of the city.

    The doors of the houses for instance, the door knocks are of different sizes and shapes and produces different knocking sounds to let the habitants know if the visitor is a man or woman. This is so that the women of the house would be properly veiled if the visitor was a male friend.

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  • joks's Profile Photo

    Museum of The Treasury of National Iranian Jewels

    by joks Written Aug 2, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This would be the richest place I have ever set foot in! This one vault located underneath the Bank of Iran holds more precious jewels you would have ever ever seen in your life.

    Diamonds and gemstones the size of an egg! Wars have been fought over these gems.The diamond of Darya-e Noor (Sea of Light) is one of the few largest diamonds in the world.

    Of course the security is tight meaning no bags allowed taken into the vault at all....thus no pictures....you have to come to gape and gawk at these riches..the treasures of the Safavid and Sassanid kings.

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  • joks's Profile Photo

    TEHRAN - NATIONAL MUSEUM and MUSEUM OF ISLAMIC ART

    by joks Written Aug 2, 2005

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    Favorite thing: With a single entry to the National Museum, you would be allowed to the enter the other museum in the next building.

    The National Museum ( showcases pre muslim artifects) was a let down after seeing the Islamic and Persian sections at the Louvre in Paris. The collections here were definitely limited and the whole top floor was cordoned off. Luckily the museum of islamic arts made up for the disappoinment with beautiful showcases of ancient Islamic artifects such as this only remaining timber door to a mosque.

    And the price is only IR 6000 instead of 30000!

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  • joks's Profile Photo

    TEHRAN - MUSEUM OF GLASS AND CERAMICS

    by joks Written Aug 2, 2005

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    Favorite thing: One of my absolute favourite museums here in Tehran due to its very cosy setting ( a restored mansion). The air conditioning was at a full blast and boy was it a relief from the 40 degrees heat outside.

    The bookshop sells great books on Iran and the Library below does have several great English picture books. The exhibits were limited but all very well displayed.

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Iran Hotels

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