Pasargad Travel Guide

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  • Pasargad
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Pasargad Things to Do

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    by donya.amini Written Dec 27, 2009

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    The first places you saw after come to Pasargad is Cyrus the great tomb, very nice and greatful tomb, but it made very simply, All original people like and love Cyrus the great.

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    by omidamini Updated May 20, 2009

    The stone tower known as zendane Soleiman
    This structure which dates from the early achaeneid period , was originally a square stone tower almost identical to the well preservedbuilding known as the ka'bah of zoroaster at Naghs e Rostam . It measured 7.25 * 7.23 meters at the base and 14 meters and reached a height of 14 meters . on the northwestern side a store case of 29 steep steps gave access at the height of 7 meters to an oblong chamber .
    The faced of the walls were ornamented by small rectangular recesses and tree pairs of " false windows " or large recesses filled in by black slabs adroned with double frames .
    In the Islamic times this monument has come to be known as the " Zendan e Soleyman " or " Solomon prisons " some have iden-ified it as a file temple , others as the treasure house for objects od religious or dynastic signifiance , but it is more probable that it was a tomb , and servs as the resting place of Cambyses son of Cyrus the Great.

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    by omidamini Written May 20, 2009

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    The most important monument in Pasargadae is the tomb of Cyrus the Great. It has six broad steps leading to the sepulchre, the chamber of which measures 3.17 m long by 2.11 m wide by 2.11 m high, and has a low and narrow entrance. Though there is no firm evidence identifying the tomb as that of Cyrus, Greek historians tell us that Alexander III of Macedon believed it was so. When Alexander looted and destroyed Persepolis, he paid a visit to the tomb of Cyrus. Arrian, writing in the second century of the common era, recorded that Alexander commanded Aristobulus, one of his warriors, to enter the monument. Inside he found a golden bed, a table set with drinking vessels, a gold coffin, some ornaments studded with precious stones and an inscription of the tomb. No trace of any such inscription survives to modern times, and there is considerable disagreement to the exact wording of the text. Strabo reports that it read:

    Passer-by, I am Cyrus, who gave the Persians an empire, and was king of Asia.
    Grudge me not therefore this monument.
    Another variation, as documented in Persia: The Immortal Kingdom, is:

    O man, whoever thou art, from wheresoever thou cometh, for I know you shall come, I am Cyrus, who founded the empire of the Persians.
    Grudge me not, therefore, this little earth that covers my body.
    The design of Cyrus' Tomb is credited alternatively to Mesopotamian or Elamite ziggurats, but the cella is usually attributed to Urartu tombs of an earlier period. In particular, the tomb at Pasargadae has almost exactly the same dimensions as the tomb of Alyattes II, father of the Lydian King Croesus; however, some have refused the claim (according to Herodotus, Croesus was spared by Cyrus during the conquest of Lydia, and became a member of Cyrus' court). The main decoration on the tomb is a rosette design over the door within the gable. In general, the art and architecture found at Pasargadae exemplified the Persian synthesis of various traditions, drawing on precedents from Elam, Babylon, Assyria, and ancient Egypt, with the addition of some Anatolian influences.

    During the Islamic conquest of Iran, the Arab armies came upon the tomb and planned to destroy it, considering it to be in direct violation of the tenets of Islam. The caretakers of the grave managed to convince the Arab command that the tomb was not built to honor Cyrus, but instead housed the mother of King Solomon, thus sparing it from destruction. As a result, the inscription in the tomb was replaced by a verse of the Qur'an, and the tomb became known as "Qabr-e Madar-e Sulaiman," or the tomb of the mother of Solomon. It is still widely known by that name today.

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