Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis) Things to Do

  • The Eastern Stairway, with shelter
    The Eastern Stairway, with shelter
    by Orchid
  • Tributes at the Northern Stairway
    Tributes at the Northern Stairway
    by Orchid
  • Assyrians bringing tribute
    Assyrians bringing tribute
    by Orchid

Most Recent Things to Do in Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis)

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    The Gate of All Nations

    by Sambawalk Updated Jul 20, 2008

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    The Gate of All Nations
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    The Gate of all Nations, referring to subjects of the empire, consisted of a grand hall that was almost 25 square metres, with four columns and its entrance on the Western Wall. There were two more doors, one to the south which opened to the Apadana yard and the other opened onto a long road to the east. Pivoting devices found on the inner corners of all the doors indicate that they were two-leafed doors, probably made of wood and covered with sheets of ornate metal.

    A pair of Lamassu's, bulls with the head of a bearded man, stand by the western threshold, and another pair, with wings and a Persian head (Gopät-Shäh), stand by the eastern entrance, to reflect the Empire’s power.

    Xerxes' name was written in three languages and carved on the entrances, informing everyone that he ordered it to be built

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    bas relief and friezes of Persepolis

    by call_me_rhia Updated May 30, 2008

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    the bull and the lion
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    There are many suggestive bas relief and friezes of Persepolis, mostly in the eastern portico of the Apadana or on the many coloumns of the archaeological site. Most of them depict human figures, like the 'Immortals', the imperial guard in three ranks, or the tribute bearers on the Tachara's western staircase.

    Occasionally there are bas reliefs of animals, in particular of bulls and lions. Bulls are symbols of the earth, and of affluence - while lions are symbols of strenght anf the sun. Represented together, as they often are, they symbolize the return to the sun to the earth - hence the spring equinox, which coincides with the Persian new year (no Ruuz).

    Another tzpical feature is the symbol of the Great God Ahuramazda, represented as a human figure rising from the sun, and with two large open wings. Ahuramazda is a Zoroastrian symbol and the God venerated by the Achaemenian kings. This fienzes, therefore, stood on palaces in order to have divine protection.

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    the tombs of Persepolis

    by call_me_rhia Updated May 30, 2008

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    going up to the tomb (in the background)
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    There are three tombs in Persepolis, and they are not located where the main ruins are but rather half-way up on the hillside behind the complex. Only two of them are finished - one is left incomplete and it is of very little interest.

    The finished ones are very nice, carved into the hillside and decorated with bas reliefs. It seems that they belonged to Artaxerxes II and Artaxerxes III. There are doubts about the unfinished one - some scholars believe that it was of Arses of Persia, and could not be finished because his reign lasted only two years.

    Other scholars, it has to be said, think that this sepulchre hosts the body of Darius III... however there is a problem with this interpretation, as Darius III would have two unfinished tombs to his name, one here in Persepolis and one in nearby Naghsh-E Rostam.

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    the ruins of Persepolis

    by call_me_rhia Updated May 30, 2008

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    persepolis, ruin
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    Persepolis is a striking sight in terms of ruins, basically because of their colossal size. At the beginning it seems that palaces were built of wood, but as the Persian rulers wanted larger and taller buildings, they soon had to face the pact that trees large enough were hard to come by. Hence they decided to use stone... more precisely marble. The marble used in the ruins that we see today is the dark-grey marble from the adjacent mountain.

    Some of the most amazing sights are the Gate of All Nations, a grand hall supported by columns and ornated with bulls with the head of a bearded man (Lamassu), often with wings; the Apadana Palace, a palace which was used for the King of Kings' official audiences; and the Throne Hall, generally used for receptions for military commanders and representatives. There are other interesting ruins in the complex, like the Tachara and Hadish palaces, the Council and Tryplion Halls, and simper storerooms, stables and military quarters.

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    Kourosh tomb

    by omidamini Written Oct 30, 2007

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    Great Kourosh tomb distance 138 km with Shiraz , it is in Pasargad , Kourosh or Cyrus is the Iran father , he made emperor Iran in 2500 year ago . alles Iranians people love Kourosh and you can here find very son , these name is Kourosh . Kourosh like every people and when win in war dont kill people . Kourosh have a MOTTO : Good speak , Good Deed and good think

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    Naghshe Rostam

    by omidamini Written Oct 30, 2007

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    Naghshe rostam is near Takhte Jamshid ( Perspolis ) but the first you see it and after that if you like you can go to Naghshe rostam , naghshe rostam like Perspolis made in 2500 years ago a very nice and interesting place for visit .

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    Perspolis ( Takhte Jamshid )

    by omidamini Written Oct 30, 2007

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    For go to Perspolis you must the first go to marvdasht and after that take a machine and go to perspolis , but native people say to Perspolis , Takhte Jamshid . summer in Fars is so hot and is better dony travel in middle of summer .

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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Apadana Staircase

    by MalenaN Written Apr 19, 2007

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    Apadana Staircase, Persepolis
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    Apadana Palace was built on a platform and two monumental stairways lead up to the palace, one on the east side and one on the north side. The stairways are very impressive because of all the beautiful bas reliefs. The bas-reliefs on the eastern wall is considered to be the best ones and are now protected under roof.
    On the eastern wall there are rows depicting delegates from the 23 subject nations of the Achaemenid Empire. The delegates are carrying gifts and their origin can be recognised because of the clothes they are wearing. Among others there are Ethiopians, Arabs, Indians Parthians , Elamites and Medians.
    Other reliefs are showing fighting lions, court nobles, guards and soldiers and their horses and chariots.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    Opening hours

    by MalenaN Written Apr 18, 2007

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    The entrance fee to Persepolis is IR 5000 (July 2006) and then you will have to pay another IR 5000 if you want to see the museum.
    During the day it can be very hot, but if that is a problem for you, you can come very early as the site opens already at 6am during the summer months. The site is open:
    Mar – Jun, Sep – Oct: 6am – 6pm
    Jul – Aug: 6am - 8pm
    Nov – Mar: 8am -5pm

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    Palace of Darius I

    by MalenaN Written Apr 18, 2007

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    Palace of Darius, Persepolis
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    The Palace of Darius is situated south of Apadana Palace and it is also built on a platform and reached by stairs with reliefs. The reliefs of those stairs depict servants walking up the stairs carrying food. There are well preserved stone reliefs around windows, doors and niches. Some are depicting the king fighting with monsters and on another the king is dressed in formal dress, on his way to leave the palace, with two attendants following him. There was a central hall with twelve columns supporting the roof with rooms around.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Castles and Palaces

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    Apadana Palace

    by MalenaN Written Apr 18, 2007

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    In the audience hall of Apadana Palace the king received the more important visitors. It was a grand hall, 60 metres long on each side with 72 columns (13 columns are still standing). The walls were covered with greenish stucco and between the columns there were beams of cedar and oak.
    Work with the palace begun in 515 BC by Darius the Great and was finished 30 years later by his son Xerxes I.

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    Darius' Treasury

    by MalenaN Written Apr 18, 2007

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    Darius' Treasury, Persepolis
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    The treasury is situated in the south eastern corner and covers a large area, over 10 000 square metres. When you stand on the hill above you can clearly see the size of the treasury and all the foundations of the hundreds of columns that once stood there.

    In the treasury you can see the Audience Relief, there is one here and the other one, the best preserved on, is at Iran National Museum in Tehran (and I had seen it when I was there). The relief was originally in the centre of the Apadana stairway but Artaxerxes had it removed. The king in the panel is Xerxes.

    When Alexander the Great visited Persepolis he plundered the treasury and it is said he needed 5000 camels and 10 000 mules to carry away all the treasures. That says something about the size of the treasury!

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    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    Royal tombs

    by MalenaN Written Apr 17, 2007

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    Tombs above Persepolis
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    Carved out of the cliffs above Persepolis are the tombs of Artaxerxes II and Artaxerxes III. Carved above the entrances to the tombs are reliefs showing the kings worshipping before a Zoroastrian fire altar.

    Artaxerxes II lived around 436 - 358 BC, and at his death his son Artaxerxes III started to rule and did so until his death 338. To protect Persia, and himself, from civil war Artaxerxes III killed his relatives when he came to power.

    It is worth going up to the tombs as you will have a good view over the whole site.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    Palace of 100 columns

    by MalenaN Written Apr 17, 2007

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    Palace of 100 columns, Persepolis
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    The largest hall in Persepolis, measuring 70 x 70metres, was the Palace of 100 columns. Here the king received tribute from the delegates of the subject nations. And from here it was then easy to remove the tribute and gifts to the stores of the Treasury, just behind, before the next visitors came.

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    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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    The Museum

    by MalenaN Written Apr 17, 2007

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    In Persepolis Museum
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    The museum in Persepolis is housed in a building that is thought to have been Xerxes’ Harem or the Queen’s Palace, and it has been a museum here since 1937.
    The artefacts in the museum are from Prehistoric, Achamenian and Islamic time and most of them are excavated in Persepolis or Estakhr. Among the artefacts are stone vessels, ceramics, relief carvings, lances and arrow tips, cloths, coins and bronze trumpets.

    The entrance fee to the museum is not included in the ticket for Persepolis but cost another IR 5000 (July 2006).

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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