Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis) Travel Guide

  • Field of columns
    Field of columns
    by Orchid
  • Bas Reliefs and empty doorways
    Bas Reliefs and empty doorways
    by Orchid
  • Assyrians bringing tribute
    Assyrians bringing tribute
    by Orchid

Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis) Things to Do

  • Apadana Palace

    The Apadana is the largest building on the terrace at Persepolis. It is believed to be the main audience hall, where the kings received tribute and dignitaries. Only a handful of the 20m tall columns, capped with lions and bull captals remain. The major feature remaining are the ceremonial stairways on the northern and eastern sides whose walls are...

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  • Gate of Xerxes I

    Many of the original structures have been re-erected since Professor Herzfeld's 1931 expedtion. This is the re-constructed Gate of Xerxes, also known as the Gate of all Nations, with it's guardian man-bulls. Above the bulls, on the inner side of the Gateway is a cuneiform inscription in the three main languages of the empire, Persian, Babylonian...

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  • Apadana Palace

    The columns of the Apadana Palace form the image of Persepolis that people are most familiar with. Darius died in 486 BC before it was completed and the construction was continued by his son, Xerxes. There are thirteen columns still standing. Originally, the roof was supported by 72 of these giant columns, each 25 metres high. On top of the columns...

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  • King's Bath

    The king's bath is supplied with water by a channel running down from the mountainside. The door of thc royal bath shows the king coming out cleaned and dressed, followed by two servants, with an umbrella and a fly swat. This domestic detail appealed to me.

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  • Sasanian Rock Reliefs

    At the base of the rock face, beneath the tombs, there are nine rock reliefs, depicting great episodes from the lives of the Sasanian kings. These include the investiture of Ardashir I, Bahram II in his royal court, two equestrian reliefs of Bahram II, the investiture of Nasreh, and an equestrian relief of Hormizd II. My photo shows the best...

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  • Naghsh-e Rostam

    The royal necropolis of Naghsh-e Rostam is, if anything, even more impressive than the main site of Persepolis. It comprises four massive tombs hewn out of the rock face. The tombs are known locally as the 'Persian crosses', because of the shape of their facades. The entrance to each tomb is at the centre of the cross, which opens onto to a small...

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  • Naghsh-e Rostam 2

    The oldest relief at Naqsh-e Rostam is severely damaged and dates to 1000 BC. It shows a man with unusual head-gear and is thought to be Elamite in origin. It is part of a larger mural, most of which was removed at the command of Bahram II. The man with the unusual cap gives the site its name, Naqsh-e Rostam, "Picture of Rostam", because the relief...

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  • Winged Male Sphinx

    I saw this at the British Museum after I visited Persepolis. It was originally part of the facade on Palace G, which was constructed by Artaxerxes III (358-338 BC), but it was later moved to form the new north facade of Palace H, which is now totally in ruins. This sphinx was removed from Persepolis by Colonel John MacDonald Kinneir during...

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  • Palace of Darius

    The most complete structure still standing in Persepolis is the Palace of Darius, also known as the Tachara or Winter Palace. Twelve massive columns supported the roof of the central hall. King Artaxerxes III made later alterations to the palace including the addition of ornamented staircases.

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  • Palace of Xerxes

    The Palace of Xerxes is quite similar in architectural style to the Palace of Darius, although it was twice as big and is slightly less well preserved than its neighbour. The best preserved part is the staircase. The main palace hall originally had 36 columns and was surrounded by six smaller rooms.

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  • Lion fighting a bull

    This is one of the most interesting details on the walls. The motif depicting the lion killing the bull is repeated many times on the walls of Persepolis. It may represent a contest between the forces of good and evil, with the bull representing the evil spirit Ahriman and the lion the Zoroastrian god Ahura Mazda. Another interpretation, and the...

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  • Staircases of the Apadana Palace

    The best kept reliefs can be seen along the staircases of the Apadana Palace. There are 23 different scenes showing us the representatives of 23 different countries in the Achaemenian Empire, how they dressed, what weapons they carried and what treasury they brought from their homelands to please the King.

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  • Tombs of King of Kings

    The two completed graves behind Takhti Jamshid would then belong to Artaxerxes II and Artaxerxes III. The unfinished one is perhaps that of Arses of Persia, who reigned at the longest two years, or, if not his, then that of Darius III (Codomannus), who is one of those whose bodies are said to have been brought "to the Persians."

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  • The Throne Hall

    Next to the Apadana, second largest building of the Terrace and the final edifices, is the Throne Hall or the Imperial Army's hall of honour (also called the "Hundred-Columns Palace). This 70x70 square meter hall was started by Xerxes and completed by his son Artaxerxes I by the end of the fifth century BC. Its eight stone doorways are decorated on...

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  • Apadana Palace

    Darius the Great built the greatest and most glorious palace at Persepolis in the western side. This palace was named Apadana (the root name for modern "ayvan") and was used for the King of Kings' official audiences. The work began in 515 BC and was completed 30 years later, by his son Xerxes I. The palace had a grand hall in the shape of a square,...

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Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis) Restaurants

  • Outside The Area...

    There are also some stalls outside the area of Persepolis (before you buy your ticket).They sell snacks, mineral water.Might be a bit expensive so it's best to dump your foods & drinks in your bag when you are in Shiraz, before taking your transport to Persepolis.

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  • A Restaurant...

    There is a restaurant inside the area of Persepolis (after you purchase the ticket).I didn't go in but it's next to the museum.Toilet is also here, you can use it for free of course.It's funny that the restaurant looks like a Chinese temple from the front !

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  • Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis) Hotels

    0 Hotels in Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis)

Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis) Transportation

  • Taxi to Persepolis and others (2012...

    iran is in an economical crisis. Fuel prices are effected directly reason of crisis. And country's economy is based on fuel. Even it is so cheap for us (for we Turks specially) but locals worrying. That 's why taxi hiring prices also increased.if you want to hire a taxi i can suggest Mr Ali without any hesitation. He says 800000 IR (less than 50 $)...

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  • Taxi to Persepolis, Naqsh-e Rostam,...

    I took a day trip by taxi from Shiaz to Persepolis, Naqsh-e Rostam, Naqsh-e Rajab, Pasargadae. The taxi is arrnaged by Anvari Hotel in Shiaz. It costs IR450,000 per car (May 2008). We started out at 7:30am and went back to hotel at 2pm. The whole duration time included about 30 mins sight-seeing in Pasargadae, 20 mins in Naqsh-e Rostam, 10 mins in...

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  • Visiting persepolis and nearby...

    Visiting Persepolis and nearby Achaemenid tombs is not really easy without a car, since there's no public transortation to the complex - there are buses that stop in the neighbouring villages, though. To reach the Achaemenid tombs 12 kilometres from Persepolis, by contrast, is just impossible.There are many agencies and internet cafes in Shiraz...

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Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis) Local Customs

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    cuneiform script, Persepolis

    by call_me_rhia Updated May 30, 2008

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    The cuneiform script is the earliest known form of written expression and we owe its existence to the Sumerians. It changed throught the centuries, starting as pictorial representations and then slowly becoming more simplified (from about 1500 to 600 signs) and more abstract, like the scripts that you can see in Persepolis. Of course the writing became more phonological, too.

    This first form of cuneiform script was at the base of the Old Persian alphabet found in Persepolis. No one could translate it until in 1835, at Behistun, Iran, a carved inscription of identical text in three languages (Old Persian, Babylonian, and Elamite) was discovered. Basically the very local version of the Rosetta stone.

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Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis) Warnings and Dangers

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    crowds entering persepolis

    by call_me_rhia Updated May 30, 2008

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    Crowds at No Ruuz, the Iranian New Year, are nearly unbearable... from the terrace of Persepolis we could see hordes of people heading towards the ruins. So many people took away some of the charm, but we still managed to enjoy our visit - nearby smaller sites were less crowded and more pleasant, though. If you are traveling at this time of the year, it's maybe a good idea to head to Persepolis very early in the morning - and be at the entrance as soon as the gates open.

    So many people means also smaller inconveniences... like going to the toilet. Queues are long and slow - and all toilets except one is a typical Iranian squat toilet, which I actually don't mind. However I learned that if you are a westerner you may skip the queue (don't worry, the lady at the door will not disapprove - if she notices you, she will tell you to skip the queue herself) and use the only western-style toilet, as no Iranians use it.

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Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis) What to Pack

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    by coceng Updated Jun 5, 2006

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    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Bring some sunscreen ! The sun is blindingly hot (in May when I was there).
    A cap, wear light shirt.
    I was there wearing sandals, no problem.

    Photo Equipment: At about 4 pm (when I was there), it's hard to capture a good photo because the sun was coming at me. I think most digital cameras can 'cure' this situation as not to turn your photo subjects in 'shadows'.
    I heard from people who went there in the morning would still suffer the blinding sunlight but it wouldn't be as hot as in the afternoon weather.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking

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Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis) Off The Beaten Path

  • naqsh-e Rajab

    Naqsh-e Rajab is a small site 3 km north of Persepolis, and it is near to Naqsh-e Rostam as well. Here you will find four early Sassanian bas-reliefs, which are important cultural remains. In the reliefs are motifs from the lives of Ardeshir Baabakaan (who was the founder of Sassanian Dynasty) and Shapur I (a great Sassanian king). One relief shows...

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  • Naqsh-e Rostam

    The tombs Naqsh-e Rostam are not far away from Persepolis and it’s definitely a must to see archaeological site. Curved on the cliffs high above the ground level are four tombs. They are believed to belong to Darius I, Artaxerxes, Xerxes I and Darius II. Underneath the tombs are Sassanian era bas-reliefs depicting scenes of imperial battles and...

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  • Naqsh-e Rajab

    The tombs of Naqsh-e Rajab (admission fee) are consisted of four Sassanian bas-reliefs with various scenes from reigns of Ardeshir I and Shapur the Great and are on ground level. They are worth of a short visit on the way between Persepolis and Naqsh-e Rostam

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Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis) Favorites

  • Persepolis

    Persepolis is not actually Persepolis... to the ancient Persians it was Pārsa, the City of Persians. To contemporary Persians it ia Takht-e Jamshid, the Throne of Jamshid. To the ancient Greeks it was simply Persēs polis, Persian city, and by this name we know it today, in the western world.Persepolis is located about 70 km northeast of...

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  • Wander Around...

    I didn't want to rush around Persepolis.I plannaed to have 2 hours there ended up to 3 hours.The area is fairly big if you want to climb to some rocky hills to see the tombs but I took times to have my drinks, smoking.So, it's wise to bring some drinks, maybe sandwiches as well. Choose a spot & while away the time.

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  • be aware of the time...

    if you pretend to visit in one day Pasargadae, Naqsh eRostam, Naqsh e Rajab and Persepolis wake up very early or you wont do it. Persepolis closes at 5 PM and when you arrive there the time will go flying...it is so fascinating that you will spend at least 3 hours visiting all including the tombs of Artaxerxes II and III.

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Explore Deeper into Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis)
The Gate of All Nations
Things to Do
bas relief and friezes of Persepolis
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the tombs of Persepolis
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the ruins of Persepolis
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Kourosh tomb
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Naghshe Rostam
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Perspolis ( Takhte Jamshid )
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Apadana Staircase
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Opening hours
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Palace of Darius I
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Apadana Palace
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Darius' Treasury
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Royal tombs
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Palace of 100 columns
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The Museum
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Xerxes' Gateway
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Persian and Medean Guards
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Old Persian Cunieform Inscription
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Throne Hall
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Car from Shiraz to Persepolis and Naqsh-e Rostam
Transportation
Persepolis
Things to Do
Tour to Persepolis
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Taxi
Transportation
Take a Taxi from Shiraz, so cheap
Transportation
Map of Takht-e Jamshid (Persepolis)

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