Tehran Things to Do

  • External view of the meuseum
    External view of the meuseum
    by moritomcat
  • A part of Persepolis
    A part of Persepolis
    by moritomcat
  • Park - E - Shahr Kiosk
    Park - E - Shahr Kiosk
    by suvanki

Most Recent Things to Do in Tehran

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    Glassware & Ceramic Museum of Iran, Abgineh Museum

    by xiquinho Updated Apr 4, 2011

    The beautiful mansion housing glass wares and ceramics was first ordered to be built as the personal residence of a politician named Ahmad Qavam in early 1920s. The building was occupied by him as residence and office up to 1953 when it was sold to the Egyptian embassy. At last, in 1976, it was converted into a museum following some repairs and changes.

    The objects exhibited in this museum, which is also called Abgineh Museum, belong to a span of time beginning from pre-Islam period up to the contemporary Iran.

    Achaemenian and Islamic periods, plain terra cotta vessels from the pre-Christian era, primitively glazed terra cotta wares from the 3rd millennium BC and Islamic period terra cotta vessels, library.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

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    Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art

    by MalenaN Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Tehran Museum of Cotemporary Art

    Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art was inaugurated in 1977. It is housed in a building with a spiral design resembling the one of Guggenheim in New York. There are nine galleries and in three of them there are exhibitions of paintings made by international artists like Monet, Pissarro, Van Gogh and Picasso, and there are also paintings made by modern Iranian artists. In six of the galleries there are temporary exhibitions. When I was there, there were photography by a few artists on display, and I liked it very much.

    There is a bookshop and a coffee shop in the museum.
    Outside there is a sculpture park.
    Entrance fee was IR 4000 (June 2006).
    Opening hours:
    Saturday - Thursday 9am - 6pm (7pm in summer)
    Friday 2pm - 6pm (7pm in summer)

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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    National Museum of Iran

    by Pakistaniguy Updated Apr 4, 2011

    This is the audience hall scene carved in stone from either Darius I or Xerxes period of Persian empire.

    In the scene, Achaemenid monarch is sitting on the throne in the center

    Behind the king is his crown prince.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • omidamini's Profile Photo

    Church

    by omidamini Updated Aug 9, 2010

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    Holy Serkis
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    If you are not Muslim don't worry , here you can find good and nice church for pray . In Iran all religion can live and stay and don't have problem with Muslims , we like all people and never mind he or she is Muslim or no.
    In below you can see some Church name and address:
    Aramaneh Torkmanchay Church, Tel 77816635 , Zarkesh St, Church ( Kelisa ) alley.
    Aramaneh Grikoor Church, Tel 22528615 , Kerman St,
    Enjili Church, 30 Tir St.
    Maryam Church, Near Italy Embassy.
    Holy Serkis, Karimkhan Zand, Tel :88901635 - 6

    Sorry, It's very hard for me to translate this name to English.

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    Jewelery Museum

    by omidamini Written Aug 9, 2010

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    Darya-e_Noor_Diamond_of_Iran
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    I am sure the nicer museum in Tehran is Jewelery museum. Very nice and historical Jewelery are in this place. For example Kiani_Crown, Coronation_belt,Darya-e_Noor_Diamond_of_Iran.
    I think Darya-e_Noor_Diamond_of_Iran is important and nicer and have nice history :In 1739, Nader Shah of Persia invaded Northern India, occupied Delhi and then massacred many of its inhabitants. As payment for returning the crown of India to the Mughal emperor, Muhammad, he took possession of the entire fabled treasury of the Mughals, including the Darya-i-noor, in addition to the Koh-i-noor and the Peacock throne. All of these treasures were carried to Iran by Nader Shah and the Darya-i-noor has remained there ever since.
    In 1965, a Canadian team conducting research on the Iranian Crown Jewels concluded that the Darya-e-Noor may well have been part of a large pink diamond that had been studded in the throne of the mughal emperor Shah Jahan, and had been described in the journal of the French jeweller Jean-Baptiste Tavernier in 1642, who called it the "Diamanta Grande Table". This diamond may have been cut into two pieces; the larger part is the Darya-e-noor ("Sea of Light"); the smaller part is believed to be the 60 carats (12 g) Noor-ol-Ein diamond, presently studded in a tiara also in Iranian Imperial collection.

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    Shamsol emare

    by omidamini Written Aug 9, 2010

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    Many years ago Naser Aldin Shah said to his friend i want a palace, can view all city ( Tehran ) from it, very soon his friend start made this place and 2 years finished it. it end 105 years ago.
    Once upon a time shamsol emaare was tallest building in Tehran. It is 30 meters.

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    Glassware and Ceramic Museum

    by omidamini Written Aug 9, 2010

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    I recommend you visit this Museum,If your hotel is middle of Tehran for example jomhoori or Hafez st, your access to this museum is very easy.
    The premises that have been turned into museum where glass and clay works are on display were built about 90 years ago upon orders of Ahmad Qavam (Qavam-ol-Saltaneh) for his personal lodging (residence and working office). The building is situated in a garden with a span of 7000 square meters and was used by Qavam himself till the year 1953.
    Later, the building were sold to the Egyptians as the new premises for the embassy of Egypt and remained in their possession for seven years. When relations were strained between Iran and Egypt at the time of Abdul Nasser and subsequent to the closure of the Egyptian embassy in Iran, the Commercial Bank purchased the building.
    However, it was sold to Farah Pahlavi’s bureau in 1976 and was turned into a museum by three groups of Iranian, Austrian and French architects. The museum was opened in 1980 and was registered in the list of national heritage in 1998.

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    Carpet Museum

    by omidamini Written Aug 9, 2010

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    How much do you know about Iranian Carpet, do you use carpet in your house ?! All Iranian people poor or rich have minimum one carpet in house .Carpet-weaving is undoubtedly one of the most distinguished manifestations of Iranian culture and art, dating back to the Bronze Age, but as the materials used in carpets including wool and cotton, decay into dust during the course of time, archaeologists couldn't make any special discovery during the archaeological excavations. What have remained for us from the early ages as evidence of carpet-weaving are nothing more than a few pieces of worn-out rugs.
    Such fragments do not help very much in recognizing the carpet-weaving characteristics of pre-Seljuk period (13th and 14th centuries AD). Among the oldest pieces discovered are those found in Eastern Turkestan, dating back to the third to fifth centuries AD, and also some of the hand-weavings of the Seljuks of Asia Minor on exhibit in Ala’edin Mosque in Konya and Ashrafoghlu Mosque in Beyshehir, Turkey. These pieces attracted the attention of researchers earlier this century, and now they are kept in the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Art in Istanbul and the Mowlana Museum in Konya.

    In a unique archaeological excavation in 1949, the exceptional Pazyryk carpet was discovered among the ices of Pazyryk Valley, in Altai Mountains in Siberia. It was discovered in the grave of a Scythian prince by a group of Russian archaeologists under the supervision of professor Rudenko. Radiocarbon testing revealed that Pazyryk carpet was woven in the 5th century BC. This carpet is 1.83×2 meters and has 36 symmetrical knots per cm2.The advanced weaving technique used in the Pazyryk carpet indicates a long history of evolution and experience of this art. Most experts believe that the Pazyryk carpet is the final achievement of at least one thousand years of experience and history. According to this theory the art of carpet-weaving in Iran is at least 3500 years old.
    In 1978, the founders of the Carpet Museum of Iran established this Museum with a limited number of Persian carpets and kilims, in order to revive and develop the art of carpet-weaving in the country, and to provide a source to satisfy the need for research about the historical background and evolution of this art
    The Carpet Museum of Iran, with its beautiful architecture and facade resembling a carpet-weaving loom is located on the northwest of Laleh Park in Tehran. It is composed of two exhibition galleries covering an area of 3400 m2.The ground floor gallery is assigned for permanent exhibitions and the upper floor gallery is considered for the temporary exhibitions of carpets, kilims, and carpet designs.

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    Golestan Palace

    by omidamini Updated Aug 9, 2010

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    If you come here please don't forget visit Golestan palace.The oldest of the historic monuments in Tehran, the Golestan Palace (Palace of Flowers) belongs to a group of royal buildings that were once enclosed within the mud-thatched walls of Tehran’s Historic Arg (citadel).

    The Arg was built during the reign of Tahmasb I (r. 1524-1576) of the Safavid dynasty (1502-1736), and was later renovated by Karim Khan Zand (r. 1750-1779). Agha Mohamd Khan Qajar (1742-1797) chose Tehran as his capital. The Arg became the site of the Qajar (1794-1925).Court and Golestan Palace became the official residence of the royal family.

    During the Pahlavi era (1925-1979) Golestan Palace was used for formal royal receptions. The most important ceremonies to be held in the Palace during the Pahlavi era were the coronation of Reza Khan (r. 1925-1941) in Takht-e Marmar and the coronation of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi (r. 1941-deposed 1979) in the Museum Hall.

    In its present state, Golestan Palace is the result of roughly 400 years construction and renovations. The buildings at the contemporary location each have a unique history.

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    Darolfonoon School

    by omidamini Written Aug 9, 2010

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    Darolfonoon made around 200 years ago by Amir kabir. We can say Darolfonon was the first college in Iran.
    The first teachers were from France, Italy, Austria and Armenia. Darolfonoon opened 13 days before Amir Akbir murder.
    Until few year ago students taught in this place but now it is close.

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    Sar dare Bagh Melli ( National Garden door )

    by omidamini Written Aug 9, 2010

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    Sar dare bagh melli made in Ghajar duration in Tehran, between 1920 to 1924, Reza khan ( firt pahlavi king ) order to made it, it made with Iranian and Germany together before world war II.
    Inside it painting picture of Great Cyrus and people from Hekhamaneshian duration.

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    National Museum of Iran

    by omidamini Written Aug 9, 2010

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    National Museum of Iran, aging more than 70 years, containing 300,000 museum objects in an area more than 20,000 square meters, is not only the largest museum of History and Archaeology of the country, but ranks as one of the few most prestigious museums of the world in regard to grand volume, diversity and quality of its huge monuments. In the Iranian museum tradition it is considered Iran’s mother museum, aiming at preserving relics of the past to hand down to the next generations, enhancing better understanding among world peoples and nations, discovering and showing Iranian’s roles in shaping world culture and civilization and trying to enhance public knowledge.

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    Dizin

    by omidamini Written Aug 9, 2010

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    Skiing has become immensely popular in Iran. The first ski-lifts seen in Iran were installed after World War II at Ab-i-Ali, about 40 miles by road east of Tehran, which is still a popular ski resort despite the counter attractions of the longer and steeper slopes at Dizin and Shemshak, the latter about 35 miles north of the capital.
    The skiing season usually lasts from December until March or April.

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    Mil Hill

    by omidamini Updated Aug 9, 2010

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    Between Tehran and Varamin road is a old place , it's name is Mil Hill or Ray fire tempo . It is for Sasanian duration and made in 1400 years ago , near Mil hill is a plain and in past Bahram Goor a king from Sasanian victim . for visit here you can go to Shush Sq and take a machine with 4 $ and for visit this place you must pay 30 cent . but please dont go to this place at night .

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    Razi SQ.

    by omidamini Updated Aug 9, 2010

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    If a day you come here with your Motorcycle and you need to refill equipment you must go to Razi SQ . here you can find everything you need . Razi SQ is south of Tehran and it's near Shush SQ , another name for Razi is Gomrok because is near custom of Tehran . But about Razi , he was a big pundit in 700 year ago , he was pathfinder Alcohol .

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Tehran Things to Do

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