Tehran Things to Do

  • External view of the meuseum
    External view of the meuseum
    by moritomcat
  • A part of Persepolis
    A part of Persepolis
    by moritomcat
  • Park - E - Shahr Kiosk
    Park - E - Shahr Kiosk
    by suvanki

Most Recent Things to Do in Tehran

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    Dizin

    by omidamini Written Aug 9, 2010

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    Skiing has become immensely popular in Iran. The first ski-lifts seen in Iran were installed after World War II at Ab-i-Ali, about 40 miles by road east of Tehran, which is still a popular ski resort despite the counter attractions of the longer and steeper slopes at Dizin and Shemshak, the latter about 35 miles north of the capital.
    The skiing season usually lasts from December until March or April.

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    Mil Hill

    by omidamini Updated Aug 9, 2010

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    Between Tehran and Varamin road is a old place , it's name is Mil Hill or Ray fire tempo . It is for Sasanian duration and made in 1400 years ago , near Mil hill is a plain and in past Bahram Goor a king from Sasanian victim . for visit here you can go to Shush Sq and take a machine with 4 $ and for visit this place you must pay 30 cent . but please dont go to this place at night .

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    Razi SQ.

    by omidamini Updated Aug 9, 2010

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    If a day you come here with your Motorcycle and you need to refill equipment you must go to Razi SQ . here you can find everything you need . Razi SQ is south of Tehran and it's near Shush SQ , another name for Razi is Gomrok because is near custom of Tehran . But about Razi , he was a big pundit in 700 year ago , he was pathfinder Alcohol .

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    Shush SQ.

    by omidamini Updated Aug 9, 2010

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    If you come Tehran and want visit south cities in Iran with bus you will go to Shush Sq and then go to Bus terminal, but i recommend for you, dont go to this place alone or if you want go to Bus terminal use from subway.
    Everything is not bad in this place, if you like see or want buy porcelain Shush Sq have big shop porcelain center in Tehran.

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    Azadi Tower

    by omidamini Written Aug 9, 2010

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    This tower which represents the city of Tehran is part of Azadi cultural complex which is located in Tehran`s Azadi square in an area of some 5 hectares.
    This complex is composed of the following sections; The 50 meter high Azadi tower, which forms the main part of the museum and its architecture, is a combination of Islamic and Sassanid architecture style. The audio - video hall of the complex which has been designed based on Iran`s geographical map displays the regional characteristics of Iran in so far as cultural, life style, religious and historical monuments are concerned.
    A mechanical conveyer allows the visitors to visit the hall in total comfort. Some art galleries and halls have been allocated to temporary fairs and exhibitions.
    The Diorama hall with 12 chambers puts to display activities in agriculture, handicrafts, modern industry, etc. A cinema, library and sideline services complement the activities of this complex.

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    Damavand

    by Amirreza.taheri Written Aug 8, 2010

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    Mount Damâvand , a potentially active volcano and the highest peak in Iran, has a special place in Persian mythology and folklore.
    it is the highest point in the Middle East and the highest volcano in all of Asia. It is a potentially active volcano since there are fumaroles near the summit crater emitting sulfur, which were known to be active on July 6, 2007.

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    Pardisan Nature Park

    by moritomcat Updated Feb 4, 2010

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    pardisan Nature park,a lovely place in tehran which you can breathe fresh air.it has a small zoo,too.in the near of here you can go to Darix Togni circus.Be conscious that the circus have gone since one years ago.

    sunset at Pardisan Nature Park Milad tower view from Pardisan Nature Park Darix Togni circus
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    • National/State Park

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    Park - E - Shahr

    by suvanki Updated Oct 29, 2009

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    We'd driven past this park earlier in the day, on our way to the Golestan Palace.

    We had come here for a meal, at the traditional Sofre Khane Sonnati Sangalag.

    This was to be my first (of many) chelo kababs (Please see my restaurant tips)

    The park was a pleasant oasis from the heat and fumes of Tehrans streets.

    Apparently there is a small lake, where it is possible to hire a boat, or even ice skate in winter! - hard to imagine in the mid day sun!!

    I'm afraid that we didn't have time to look around the park at this visit, as we were rushing out to Behesht-E-Zahra and 'The Holy Shrine' of Imam Khomeini, before the 'rush hour' in the traffic.

    Park - E - Shahr Kiosk Park - E - Shahr - Sangalag Restaurant
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    US Den of Espionage

    by suvanki Updated Oct 29, 2009

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    The former US embassy was a couple of minutes walk away from my hotel,

    I was morbidly curious to see the murals, painted onto the outer walls of this building denouncing the USA etc.

    My driver and guide had pointed them out, as we'd passed on the way to my hotel early that morning, even driving past again. I wanted to see them up close and in daylight.

    I'd expected this mural of the Statue of Liberty, with its face altered to a skull, to be bigger than it was.

    I tried to ask my guide what the slogans said as we were walking round, but he just said it was propaganda, and difficult to translate! OK- I left it at that.

    I'd read conflicting reports about whether you could take photos or not. My guide said that I could - 'there's not a problem'

    So, I took a pic of one of the 'difficult to translate, propaganda slogans' and headed back towards the skull mural, to capture this too.

    Well I didn't get much further as I was aware of someone shouting 'STOP'! I turned to see an armed soldier, with a hefty suited man standing behind him looking none too happy -
    Great!!! Less than an hour after leaving my hotel, and only a few hours of being in Iran, and I was in trouble :-(

    We were directed to a small office, which was packed with gun toting uniformed men and a few more 'suits' all wearing sun shades and thick moustaches and or beards.

    I was trying not to panic, as I tried to remember where the delete button was on my brand new camera, which I was still getting used to.

    Luckily my guide was there to do the talking. I just showed the pic on my camera, and deleted it - pheew!
    That was it, we were free to go.

    So, I never got the pic I wanted - the pic below was downloaded from another website.

    The men I'd encountered were members of the Sepah militia - a hard line group, who are dedicated to defending the Revolution. Also known as The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps or Revolutionary Guards Link

    The building has been the scene of many incidents through history

    1953- CIA operatives staged a coup d'etat, bringing the collapse of the government of Mohammed Mossadegh

    US support for Mohammed Reza was organised from here, until he fled the country on 16th Jan 1979

    November 1979 - 400 Revolutionary Guards stormed the Embassy, holding 53 staff as hostages for 444 days.

    Inside, the Chancery is a museum, which apparently has incriminating documents, that were pieced together after having been shredded! It only opens from 1st - 10th February!

    So, There are no signs saying You can't take photos, and the rule is that You can, unless You're caught!

    Perhaps best not to risk it- just look, and then use the pic below.

    Statue of Liberty skull mural  US Den of Espionage
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    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

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    Holy Shrine of Imam Khomeini

    by suvanki Updated May 17, 2009

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    I'd passed this shrine on the way from the airport, and was curious to see inside - I'd recently seen a documentary on Islamic Art, where part of the filming was done here.
    I think my guide was a bit surprised by my request to go here. I wasn't entirely sure if it was a good idea, but we set off.

    The shrine is still undergoing construction. From a distance you can see the 4 towers (one to represent each of Khomeinis daughters) which each reach 91 metres (the age when he died) The gold dome is embellished with 72 tulips (to remember the 72 people who fought alongside the Ayatollah in Karbala, and were killed)

    Entering the large car park, I could see lots of people picnicking, many having erected the small tents, that I was to see many more of during my trip.

    I removed my shoes and took them to a man standing by a rack, who smiled and said 'Welcome to Iran'

    Entering the shrine (Through the separate Womens entrance) I was surprised to see an X-Ray machine. My bag was put through, while I was frisked. The bleep went off, and my bag was sent through again. I was wondering what had set the bleep off, when I suddenly remembered my Swiss Army knife was in one of the pockets.

    Just as I was about to wonder if this was going to be my second 'incident' of the day (See my US Den of Spies tip) I was waved through, by a chador wearing woman. She asked my country, then announced this to her fellow workers. Intermittently she appeared at my side asking 'Iran good'?? I was expecting to have to wear a chador, but this wasn't necessary.

    I'd read in my guide book, that it was strictly no photographs, so wasn't expecting to be seeing men and women with their phone cameras snapping away.

    The shrine itself is in a large glass case, cordoned off into separate sides for males and females.

    A photograph of Khomeini sits at the foot of his tomb, which is next to his sons tomb.
    the floor is littered with bank notes, of different values and currencies.

    I was wondering how the money got there, when my guide (Hovering nearby in the Mens section) indicated slots in the glass case at eye level.

    There were a few individuals walking around the tomb, praying and kissing the glass wall, others just sat in groups chattering. Apparently, Khomeini had requested his shrine be a public place where the public could visit and enjoy themselves, rather than a mosque, with its codes of behaviour and restrictions. It is open 24/7

    Holy Shrine of Imam Khomeini Holy Shrine of Imam Khomeini Holy Shrine of Imam Khomeini - slots for money Holy Shrine of Imam Khomeini - framed photo Holy Shrine of Imam Khomeini - Cash offerings
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    • Budget Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Golestan Palace Complex

    by suvanki Updated May 17, 2009

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    Entering the complex through the gate, I saw a typical Iranian garden with a central pool, surrounded by lawns, trees , shrubs and flowers.
    (Golestan Palace is also known as 'The Palace of Flowers' )

    In the distance were buildings edging the width of the park. These buildings were the palaces of the Qajar rulers. Some date back 400 years.

    This was once the heart of Tehran, and was enclosed by the mud walls of the Citadel (or Arg)

    Open 09.00 -15.30 Closed Thursdays and Sundays


    I left my guide to sort out the tickets at the nearby kiosk. Tickets for entrance to the individual palaces must be purchased here, so plan ahead which ones you want to see.

    He returned, to apologetically explain that some of the 7 palaces open to the public were closed (for renovation) including the Ethnographical museum, where I had been looking forward to seeing exhibits of Iranian life such as a tea house and a Qajar wedding.

    Never mind, there was still plenty to see!-

    Nasser al -Din Shah, ruled from1848 -96. He visited Europe on many occasions, and inspired by the palaces that he'd seen on his travels, had this impressive complex built, which would have contained private living quarters for his family and staff, as well as offices and ministries.

    Please continue to my following tips-

    Golestan Palace Complex - Pool Golestan Palace Complex - Pool Golestan Palace Complex
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    Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art

    by suvanki Updated May 17, 2009

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    This museum was a pleasant surprise, my guide and I were 'killing time' waiting for our driver, and came across the Park - E - Laleh (see previous tip).

    Initially, we just looked into the entrance foyer, where a bright glass mobile was catching the light - but a man at the ticket office waived us in, to look around.

    My guide explained we were only going to have time for a quick look. - we got free admission!
    I wasn't really too bothered about looking at modern art - I think I was still traumatised from the exhibits at the Biennale in Venice last year!

    However, I was surprised to see lots of pictures that I did like.

    The paintings are displayed in different rooms off a corridor, where young chador clad students, clutching notepads, were studying the artwork, or making sketches and notes.

    The museum has both temporary and Permanent exhibits, of Iranian artists work.

    Surprisingly, it has what may be considered the greatest collection of Western Art in Asia, with billions of $'s worth of paintings by artists as diverse as Picasso, Van Gough, Warhol, Pollock, Matisse and Dali. However, this collection is not displayed at present -as it is deemed to be a symbol of Western liberalism.

    The museum was established in the 1970's by Queen Farah Diba, and is housed in the modernist concrete building, which is one of the many 'modern landmarks' erected by the Shah in the 1970's.

    Later in my trip, in Esfahan, I came across the work of Abbas Rostamian, and was very taken with his paintings and treated myself to a piece. I read that some of his work is exhibited here.

    Although we didn't have time for a drink, the cafe here is apparently quite good, and serves real coffee!

    Open 0900 - 1800 Sat - Thurs
    1400 - 1800 Fri
    Closes 1900 in Summer

    Admission IR4000

    Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art
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    Shohada Museum (Martyrs Museum)

    by suvanki Updated May 17, 2009

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    Opposite the US Den of Espionage is this museum dedicated to the memory of Irans Martyrs or Shahids.
    Open Saturday - Thursday 08.30 - 15.30. Free admission.

    Although there are 2 floors of exhibits - I only saw the first floor.

    Glass cases contain photographs, personal items, and a certificate of the Martyrs name, date of birth and death, age at death, where/ how they died and a 'tribute'
    Some of the cases contained blood stained clothing or shoes that had been blown off by a bomb blast.

    Quiet music is played in the background. There were very few other visitors at the time of our visit.

    Most of the exhibits are dedicated to the martyrs who died in the 8 year Iran - Iraq war or the 1979 Revlution, though there are also victims of torture.

    One exhibit that was pointed out to me was The "miracle" of the daughter of a martyr. Her exam schedule had to be signed by her father. He was Mojtaba Salehi, a cleric who was killed in an ambush as he drove food supplies to the front line.
    The girl dreamed that her dead father had signed the school report, and when she awoke it had indeed been signed. Witness statements confirm the miracle!

    I understand that there are guided tours of the museum, though I expect these are mainly in Farsi.

    Later that day, I visited the Martyrs Cemetery - Behesht-e Zahra, which was quite a moving experience. (see my later tip).

    Shi'ites believe that blood can revitalize religion and that the shahid [martyr] has the highest position in society.

    The book 'Persian Mirrors: The Elusive Face of Iran'. (2000) by Elaine Sciolino includes a piece on Martyrdom in Iran.

    Shohada (Martyrs) Museum
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    • Study Abroad
    • Historical Travel

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    Sarkis Church

    by Behi Updated Mar 24, 2009

    Sarkis Armenian Orthodox church built in the late 1960s.
    It is the most visible non-Islamic building in the city.

    across the street painted on a large building is a mural of the Virgin Mary holding the baby Jesus in her arms & a statue of Madonna & the son flourish the Park-e Hazrat Maryam.

    Sarkis Church Sarkis Church Madonna &  the son, St. Maryam Park Mary wall painting, St. Maryam Park Sarkis Church
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    Ebarat Museum - Everything About the Revolution

    by anitayusof Written Feb 19, 2009

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    I found this place by mistake when I'm trying to find Jewel Museum. It was not listed as the must see places for tourists but it caught my attention when I look at pictures at the ad board outside the museum. It showed pics of tortured victims during the era of revolution. I can't go in as yet bcos they hv schedules visiting hours since you can't explore the museum on your own. I came back at 2pm. There were about 100 people (mostly locals), and a guide took us in. First, we were shown a movie about the revolution. It was in farsi and I didn't understand much. However a very nice Iranian helped translated everything for me (without being asked to do so). Then, we were taken to the exhibition rooms, from one floor to another, showing pics of the Shah and his family and their fortunes, the important people in SAVAK who were responsible in giving orders for the torturing and finally we were shown actual devices and equipments used to torture the victims (something like Tuol Sleng - S21 prison in Cambodia). Wax statues were used to show how the torturing were done and it could be a bit scary for children bcos it was quite real (the bloods etc). By joining this tour, one could fully understand what actually goes on during the revolution and why Iranians are like how they are now. The last part of the tour was when we were taken to the shower room where a few wax victim statues lining up, and the sounds of screaming were played, to show that the victims are getting insane by the torturings (this part was pretty scary). We were given key chains as souvenirs and were asked to send the correct messages to the world about the revolution. The total time for the guided tour was about 2 hours. I can't take any picture since it was not permitted. I regard this as a very useful experience since I myself previously had some incorrect idea about the revolution, but now I have a better understanding on what's going on during that difficult times for the Iranians.

    Entrance fee is IR 50 000 (about USD 5).

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

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Tehran Things to Do

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