Baghdad Things to Do

  • Teatime!
    Teatime!
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  • "Broken Hearts" memorial of Iran-Iraq...
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  • An aerial view of  Ziggurat in Ur, Iraq
    An aerial view of Ziggurat in Ur, Iraq
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Most Recent Things to Do in Baghdad

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    Visiting Baghdad Museum

    by hunterV Written Mar 30, 2005

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    Baghdad Museum, Baghdad

    The museum is located in Mamoun Street, near Shuhada (Martyrs) Bridge.
    Traditional professions and popular customs of Baghdad are represented at this museum in colorful life-size sculptures.
    Many of those professions and customs are fast disappearing or have disappeared, but they are still very interesting to see, even as images.
    For instance, you will see the old water-carrier, the weaver, the Zakariya Fast ritual, the bridegroom's ceremony, etc.
    A multilingual library on relevant subjects is also part of the museum.
    Paintings, photographs, maps and other illustrative material depict aspects of the city's history, together with the portraits of famous men who once ruled the city.
    The museum is administered by the capital's mayor’s office.
    The museum is/was open all days of the week.

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    Visiting Wastani Gate

    by hunterV Written Mar 20, 2005

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    Wastani Gate, Sheikh Omar Street, Baghdad

    When Abu Jaafar Al-Mansour built Baghdad in AD 762, it was a round city, with walls and four gates at an angle of 90 degrees for defensive purposes.
    Main administrative and religious buildings were placed near the center for easy approach. Although the capital was abandoned for Samarra in AD 836, the Abbasids went back to it in AD 892, and the city continued to expand on both sides of the river. Al-Mustarshid Billah, AD 1118-1135, was the first Caliph to build a wall on the eastern (Rusafa) side of the city, which remained until late in the 19th century.
    The Eastern Wall was very thick, built from bricks, with several watchtowers and a deep moat connected with the Tigris. The main gates were: Mu'adham (North) Gate,
    Dhafariya (Wastani) Gate,
    Halaba (Talisman) Gate
    and Basaliya Gate.
    The only gate extant today is the Wastani Gate located near the Tomb of Omar Sahrawardi - just off Sheikh Omar Street.
    It is a high cylinder-shaped tower with a ground circumference of 56 meters, 14.5 meters high, crowned with an octagonal dome. On the northwest side it has a portal 3 meters wide with a pointed arch, in front of which is a bridge across the moat. On the southwest side of the tower is a door that leads to an even bigger and higher bridge over the moat.
    In the course of the extensive construction works undertaken by the government, workers on the speedy way near South Gate recently hit upon the remnants of what transpired to have been Halaba (Talisman) Gate, which was destroyed by the Ottomans in 1917. It had been last renewed some seven centuries earlier — in 1221; it has now been preserved with care, to stand as another monument telling a part of the history of Baghdad.

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    Museum Square, Karkh

    by hunterV Written Mar 20, 2005

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    Museum Square, Iraq Museum, Baghad

    The Iraqis say that few countries in the world are as rich in archaeology as Iraq.
    The Iraq Museum, for example, with its great well-organized and carefully labeled collection of archaeological finds is a reflection of this richness.
    A record of the many peoples and cultures which flourished in Mesopotamia from time immemorial up to the centuries of the Arab empire, the Museum offers a vivid display of pre-historic remains, of the civilizations and arts of the Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Assyrians, Chaldeans, Seleucids, Parthians, Sas-sanians, and Abbassids.
    The display halls are chronologically arranged in this order.
    For the benefit of scholars, the Museum has a rich multilingual library, which adds to the prestige of the Iraq Museum as one of the best in the world of Mesopotamian studies.

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    Exploring Rusafa

    by hunterV Written Mar 18, 2005

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    Khan Murjan, Rusafa, Baghdad, Iraq

    Lying opposite Mustansiriya School, Khan Murjan was, together with other buildings and orchards, an endowment to help maintain the school and its scholars.
    Architecturally, the Khan is extremely interesting.
    It is built round a great central hall with a high ceiling, with two stories of rooms on all sides looking on to it.
    To reach the upper rooms there is an elevated path built on brick-ornamented arches.
    Fourteen meters high and the only completely roofed Khan in Iraq, it is so roofed that light falls in from above from the apertures of the pointed arches.
    It suffered neglect in later times until it was saved and reconstructed in 1935 and turned into a museum of Arab antiquity.
    Today Khan Murjan is a first class restaurant where Iraqi dishes are served and folkloric music performed at night.

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    Ancient Architecture

    by hunterV Written Mar 17, 2005

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    Mustansiriya School

    Mustansiriya School is very special for its unique architecture.
    It has a quasi-rectangular plan measuring 104.8 metres in length and 44.2 in width in the north, 48.8 in the south, making up an area of 4,836 square meters.
    The built-up part totals 3,121 square meters, the rest being a courtyard of 1,710 sq. m. lined on all sides by ewans — large ornamented galleries completely open to the courtyard.
    There are rooms on two stories that were for students lodging, study and lecture halls, a library (that once held 80,000 books), a kitchen, a bathroom and, notably, a pharmacy attached to a hospital. It has its own garden, together with a house once specially used for the study of the Koran and another for the study of Holy Tradition.
    Mustansiriya was also famous for its clock that told the hours astronomically: apart from telling the hours, it specified the position of the sun and the moon at every hour, besides other mechanical curiosities.

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    Mustansiriya School

    by hunterV Written Mar 17, 2005

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    Mustansiriya School , Rusafa, Baghdad

    The Mustansiriya School with courses in Arabic, Theology, Astronomy, Mathematics, Pharmacology and Medicine with application hospital, was the most prominent university in the Islamic world of Abassids.
    It overlooks the Tigris from the Rusafa side, near Shuhada Bridge. It was built within six years in the reign of the 37th Abbasid Caliph Al-Mustansir Billah (A. D. 1226-1242), after whom it was called.
    Almost three quarters of a million dinars in gold was spent on its construction and had an endowment valued at about one million dinars in gold from which the School obtained an annual revenue of 70,000 dinars to spend on staff and students.

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    See the crossed swords

    by american_tourister Updated Jan 30, 2005

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    Limp wristed swordsmen

    These swords are really a metal sculpture and are made from the melted Iranian helmets captured in the Iran-Iraq War in the 1980's. That is another of Saddams aggressions that everyone has forgotten about. He picked a fight that cost a few hundred thousand lives that time.

    I took this photo from a Black Hawk on a cold and grimy day.

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    alqosh(northern iraq)

    by amu_iraqi87 Written Sep 22, 2003

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    alqosh is one of the oldest assyrian catholic towns of iraq.. it is located about 30 minutes north of mosul.. it is full of assyrian monastaries and they are amazing.. if you get the chance.. go up there and meet the amazing people.. i have family there and i visited.. i had the best time there.. the kids love soccer.. so if you can.. donate soccer balls.. shoes, etc to them.. they' would love that

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  • Saddam's Main Palace Downtown

    by JoeDeepSeaDiver Written May 27, 2003

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    This is now where such fine organizations such as ORHA (Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance) are located. Many great things are being planned to rebuild Iraq and help its people.

    At this palace, many Iraqis are already employed, trying to help with their economy.

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    Along Abu Nuwas Street

    by hunterV Updated Mar 9, 2008

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    Shahrayar and Shahrazad: 1,000 and One Night
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    Here near the Wharf you will see this fairy-tale monument to the well-known heroes: Shahrayar and Shahrazad.
    Shahrazad is depicted telling King Shahrayar her one thousand and one stories.

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    Liberation Square

    by hunterV Updated Mar 9, 2008

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    Liberation Square, Baghdad, Iraq
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    Here you will see the famous Liberty Monument dedicated to the struggle of the Iraqi people in the dark days before the July Revolution of 1958.

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  • Gold Galore!

    by JoeDeepSeaDiver Written May 27, 2003

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    There is gold throughout the palaces of Saddam. It seems like every faucet is plated, even the ones outside by his pool house.

    Check out these doors! There are doors like this all over.

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Baghdad Things to Do

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