Bahai Shrine and Gardens, Haifa

38 Reviews

Yefe Nof Street or Via Ha'tzionut Ave.

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  • Baha'i Gardens
    Baha'i Gardens
    by mindcrime
  • tourist group going down the gardens
    tourist group going down the gardens
    by mindcrime
  • Shrine of the Bab
    Shrine of the Bab
    by mindcrime
  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    Bahai

    by traveloturc Updated Nov 11, 2013

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Faith’s Founder was Bahá’u’lláh, a Persian nobleman from Tehran who, in the mid-nineteenth century, left a life of princely comfort and security . His life, work, and influence parallel that of Abraham, Krishna, Moses, Zoroaster, Buddha, Christ, and Muhammad.
    The essential message of Bahá’u’lláh is that of unity. He taught that there is only one God, that there is only one human race, and that all the world’s religions represent stages in the revelation of God’s will and purpose for humanity. In this day, Bahá’u’lláh said, humanity has collectively come of age. As foretold in all of the world’s scriptures, the time has arrived for the uniting of all peoples into a peaceful and integrated global society. “The earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens,”
    This place in the slope of Haifa includes also the gardens.....A must see place ...

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    Baha’i gardens

    by mindcrime Written Nov 9, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Baha���i gardens
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    The most popular attraction in Haifa is by far the Baha’i gardens and its golden domed Shrine of the Bab which is the resting place of Herald, prophet of Baha’i faith but also the focal point of the International Baha’i community and its administrative center which is a building inside the gardens that looks like an ancient greek temple!.

    The gardens can be found sitting on the hillside overlooking Haifa harbor over the German Colony with the Shrine in the central level of the gardens. Although they are formal gardens (many nice flowers, fountains, some sculptures etc but the impressive thing is that there are actually 19 terraces all the way up to northern slope of mount Carmel) they are very well preserved (most gardeners are volunteers that come and work here) and it was pretty relaxing to walk around. Don’t forget that this is actually a religious site(the holiest site of pilgrimage for the members of the Bahá'í faith).

    There are 3 different individual entrances (lower, central and upper level), you can enter for free in any of them and take pictures but you wont be allowed to change level without a guided tour. That’s why we preferred to start from the top level and follow the English tour at noon that went slowly downhill with several stops to take pictures. The beautiful guide was very informative about Siyyud Ali Muhammad (aka Bab) a nobleman who was the founder of Baha’i faith in Persia/Iran (mid 19th century) where he made the prophecy of the upcoming Baha’ullah. The religion focusing on unity of humanity, all religions into one, no different races etc
    He was imprisoned in a dark damp cell in Tehran and later in Akko where he died and buried in 1892… no surprise this religion focuses on light that much.

    The guide also answered lots of questions we made although she had to handle people that were in a hurry to go down and out!

    Many others just visited the upper level, took some pictures (there’s panoramic breathtaking view) and left without following the tour (by the way the entrance for the tour is 100m west of the main entrance) which isn’t a bad choice if you have limited time in Haifa.

    The gardens are open daily 9.00-17.00 (inner gardens and shrine 9.00-12.00)
    There’s no entrance fee for the gardens or the tour and there’s no need for reservation (unless you are a group of 25 or more). Check for timetable here (watch out, there’s no tour on Wednesday)

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  • white_smallstar's Profile Photo

    Bahá’í Gardens in Haifa

    by white_smallstar Written Jul 9, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Bahá’í Gardens in Haifa:

    the shrine and the inner gardens can only be visited from 9:00 to 12:00 noon and the Shrine in Haifa will be closefor deep cleaning 29 July – 11 August, inclusive. Gardens open as usual.

    More info on the official web site.
    http://www.ganbahai.org.il/en/haifa/

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Baha'i Gardens

    by leffe3 Updated Jul 23, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Sitting proudly on the hillside, the golden domed Baha'i Temple and surrounding Hanging Gardens dominate the skyline from the coastal road. Chicago and Haifa are the 2 main centres for this faith, and a recent huge investment resulted in the complete re-landscaping of the gardens, descending several hundred feet down the slopes.

    They're very formal gardens and, at its heart, stands the golden-domed Shrine of the Bab, the resting place of the Prophet-Herald of the Bahá’í Faith.

    Outer gardens open 9am-5pm daily, inner gardens closer to the shrine close at 12 noon (free entry).

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    Bahai Gardens, Haifa

    by Danalia Updated Apr 8, 2011

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    Bahai Gardens, Haifa
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    These gardens, located in the heart of Haifa, comprise a staircase of nineteen terraces extending all the way up the northern slope of Mount Carmel. The golden-domed Shrine of the Báb, the resting place of the Prophet-Herald of the Bahá’í Faith, stands on the central terrace, looking across the bay towards ‘Akko.

    While different parts of the gardens offer a variety of experiences, they speak in a common language of graveled paths, hedges and flower beds groomed and nurtured by dedicated gardeners. The gardens frame panoramic views of the city, the Galilee Hills and the Mediterranean Sea.
    There are several ways to visit: If you wish to discover the gardens on your own, you can visit any of the three areas that are accessible from different parts of the city, as shown on the interactive site map below. To learn more about these areas, hover or click on the numbers identifying the entrances.

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    Visit the Ba'hai Gardens

    by TravellerMel Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Ba'Hai Gardens
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    Beautiful gardens on the slope of Mount Carmel, overlooking Haifa harbor. Open to the public free of charge, the Gardens are still a religious site and as such require modest dress, and quiet consideration of others.

    Only a section of the terraced gardens were open when I visited (I believe due to our time of arrival), but what we did see was absolutely breathtaking. The Shrine offers free walking tours daily - if you have the time, I would think that would be a wonderful thing to do.

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  • gilabrand's Profile Photo

    The Measure of All Things

    by gilabrand Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If Haifa is famous for anything nowadays, it has to be the Bahai temple and gardens on the slope of Mount Carmel. According to a recent newspaper article, almost half of all tourists to Haifa go there just to see the gardens (now a World Heritage Site). Tours are free, but you need to call in advance to join one of the groups that go either up or down the mountain. The tour guides will tell you the story of Siyyud Ali Muhammad, aka the Bab (meaning “door”), who invented a new religion in mid-19th century Iran, which got him executed by a firing squad.
    His remains were hidden by his followers for 60 years, until they were buried in a mausoleum on the Carmel.

    The Bab prophesied the coming of the Baha’ullah (meaning “splendor of God”), who was thrown into a dungeon in Tehran, exiled four times and finally imprisoned in Akko. After spending so much time in dark, damp jail cells, maybe it is not that strange that the founders of the Bahai religion hailed light as a metaphor for spiritual illumination, and lush gardens became a synonym for spiritual life.

    So yes, by all means go see the Bahai gardens. They are gorgeous – no question about it. But I must tell you that as I walked through this paradise on earth some years ago, I felt a vague sense of unease. The perfection and symmetry are not to be believed. The gardeners use rulers and measuring tapes when they do their pruning to insure that every plant and hedge is perfectly uniform in shape and size. So you are walking through a Garden of Eden - but it is a very controlled one, with very little left up to nature.

    Not long ago, I saw a TV documentary about the Bahai that backed up my intuition that there is something vaguely sinister about the place. It turns out that underneath the fabulous terraced gardens laid out with such precision is a gigantic underground hideout complete with bomb shelters, conference rooms, doctors’ clinics, dining hall, supermarket and parking garages – all spotlessly shiny and clean…and eerily empty.

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  • NYTim's Profile Photo

    Madness in the gardens

    by NYTim Updated Apr 4, 2011

    We are in a Hebrew speaking country and our tour guide spoke only Russian -- very funny on deed. We were a group of kibbutz volunteers from 30 years ago holding our reunion. We were Dutch, Scottish, German and English -- but no Russians.

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  • WStat's Profile Photo

    See the golden dome of the Baha'i shrine !

    by WStat Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Baha'i Shrine and Gardens in Haifa
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    The golden dome of Baha'i Shrine dominates Haifa. Together with its wonderful, "unreal" gardens the shrine features the tomb of the founder of the Bahai faith. The monumental dome over the tomb was completed in 1953.
    The Baha'i Shrine and Gardens in Haifa, the focal point of the International Bahai community, is not only the spiritual centre of the Bahai faith, but also its administrative heart.

    The Persian Gardens consist of 19 terraces with some wonderful fountains and flowers, marble benches and pathways made of red rubble. In the10th terrace lays the beautiful Shrine of the Bab. Bab was one of the two founders of the Bahai faith. The administrative buildings, although in a modern style,resemble to a certain degree the antique Greek architecture.

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  • Bavavia's Profile Photo

    Bahai Gardens

    by Bavavia Updated Apr 4, 2011

    The man that the Baha’is believe was the "Promised One" – Husayn-Ali, Baha’u’llah – was exiled from Persia and settled in what was then Palestine under the Ottoman Turkish empire. He is buried near Akko where he died in 1892. Baha’u’llah’s son, Abbas Effendi, instructed believers to purchase large tracts of Mount Carmel overlooking Haifa Bay, which Baha’u’llah had envisaged as the world headquarters of the Baha’i faith

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  • WorldMeet2008's Profile Photo

    Greatest attraction of Haifa

    by WorldMeet2008 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    photo by Alon321
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    From Galy's Haifa page:
    "The Golden Dome is a shrine, not a temple, where the Bab (ar. "the Gate") and Baha'u'llah's son Abdu'l-Baha are buried. It's in the Bahai Gardens. You can reach it from the united nation avenue(shderot hatzionut) every day from 09:00a.m. to 12:00 . No need for reservation or organised tour, just walk in. The inside is nice but modest compare with the outside and the sorounding garden. Don't forget to take off your shoes when u enter"

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    New BaiHai Gardens, set 7

    by Martin_S. Updated Apr 4, 2011
    New BaiHai Gardens, central garden path
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    These photos show the central gardens immediately adjacent to the temple itself, they form an "interlude" between the outside world and the temple. There is no direct access to the temple, you must arrive there by way of the gardens.

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    New Baihai Gardens, set 2

    by Martin_S. Updated Apr 4, 2011
    New Bahai Gardens, Haifa, Israel
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    From the upper entrance you are met by one of the guides, all volunteers from the Baihai community who come to serve for a year. The photos here do not do justice to the beauty of the gardens, but they will give you an idea. This set of photos were all taken on the access or entrance path, you at first do not see in full what is waiting for you.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    New Baihai Gardens, set 3

    by Martin_S. Updated Apr 4, 2011
    New Bahai Gardens, Haifa, Israel
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    All along the pathways in the garden you find these small oasis of palm trees, some with small swaths of lawn and other bordering on a small pool of crystal clear water. Some might have a small bench that can be used to sit for a moment and enjoy the view or just to rest your feet from the climb. Always in the "picture" is the shrine itself, from every edge of the garden it can be seen.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    New Baihai Gardens, set 4

    by Martin_S. Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Bai Hai Garden fountain, Haifa, Israel
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    Scattered around the Bai Hai gardens are sets of pools, or maybe a better word would be "situated", since they are far from a disorderly "scatter". They are well placed to offset the green and compliment the elements of stone that enclose them. Just one more element in the total soothing effect of the gardens. The pools are often "accompanied" by a bench, set in the shade of a palm tree where you can rest your feet while enjoying the gardens.

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