Nazareth Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Nazareth

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    Basilica of the Annunciation: Lower Level

    by machomikemd Written Sep 5, 2013

    The lower level of the Church Houses the remains of the previous byzantine and crusader churches, ancient artifacts and the cave where it was held to be the Remains of the Virgin Mary's House and this excavations extends outside of the church (i will have separate pictures of it)

    The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jersusalem (traditionaly is where Jesus was crucified and was buried) and the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem maybe the most famous Christian Sites in the Holy Land, but the Basilica of the Annunciation is the Largest Christian Church in the Middle East. The Church is located in the center of the City of Nazareth, on Casa Nova Street. It stands over the site that was believed to be the site of Mary's house, where angel Gabriel appeared and announced to Mary that she is about to give birth of Jesus (Luke 1). This current church was rebuilt in 1969 and stands at 4 previous Byzantine and Crusader Churches. The church is the traditional site of the Annunciation of Mary and her house is located at the lower level of the church. Roman Catholics and Protestants and Evengelicals consider this site as the traditional site while the Orthodox Churches have an alternate site built along the Mary's Spring, Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation was erected at that alternate site.

    the church is open to the public from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm everyday and is under the custody of the Franciscan Roman Catholic Order.

    according to wikipedia:

    The church was established at the site where, according to Roman Catholic tradition, the Annunciation took place. Greek Orthodox tradition holds that this event occurred while Mary was drawing water from a local spring in Nazareth, and the Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation was erected at that alternate site.

    The current church is a two-story building constructed in 1969 over the site of an earlier Byzantine-era and then Crusader-era church. Inside, the lower level contains the Grotto of the Annunciation, believed by many Christians to be the remains of the original childhood home of Mary. Under Roman Catholic canon law, the church enjoys the status of a minor basilica.[1] A historically significant site, considered sacred within some circles of Christianity, particularly Catholicism, the basilica attracts many Catholic, Anglican, and Eastern Orthodox Christian visitors every year.

    The first shrine was probably built sometime in the middle of the 4th century, comprising an altar in the cave in which Mary had lived. A larger structure was commissioned by Emperor Constantine I, who had directed his mother, Saint Helena, to found churches commemorating important events in Jesus Christ's life. The Church of the Annunciation was founded around the same time as the Church of the Nativity (the birthplace) and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre (the tomb). Some version of it was known to have still been in existence around 570 AD, but it was destroyed in the 7th century after the Muslim conquest of Palestine.[citation needed]

    The second church was built over the ruins of the Byzantine era church during the Crusades, following the conquest of Nazareth by Tancred in 1102.[2] The Crusader era church was never fully completed. Five Romanesque capitals carved by artists from northern France, and discovered during excavations in 1909, had not yet been installed in 1187 when news of Saladin's victory in the Battle of Hittin reached the city.[2] Saladin granted permission to Franciscan priests to remain in Nazareth to oversee services at the church.[2]


    The Church of the Annunciation, interior (about 1925)
    In 1260, Baybars and his Mamluk army destroyed the church during their attack on Nazareth.[2] A small number of Franciscans managed to stay in Nazareth until the fall of Acre in 1291. In the three centuries that followed, the Franciscans were in and out of Nazareth, depending on the local political situation, which was constantly in flux. Franciscan accounts of this period document their expulsion in 1363, their return in 1468 and a massacre of some of their members in 1542. Local Christian families with Franciscan support helped take care of the church as well during this period.[3]

    Emir Fakr ad-Din granted the Franciscans permission to return in 1620, at which time they constructed a small structure to enclose the holy grotto that is venerated as the house of Mary.[3] In 1730, Dhaher al-Omar permitted construction of a new church, which became a central gathering place for Nazareth Latin community. The church was enlarged in 1877, and then completely demolished in 1954 to allow for the construction of a new basilica, which was completed in 1969.[3] The new basilica was designed by the Italian architect Giovanni Muzio, and built by the Israeli building firm Solel Boneh during the years 1960-69. Used by the Latin parish, it remains under the control of the Franciscans. It is the largest Christian sanctuary in the Middle East, and was dedicated in 1964 by Pope Paul VI.

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    Basilica of the Annunciation: Upper Church

    by machomikemd Written Sep 5, 2013

    The Upper Level of the Church serves as the Local Parish of the Community and where Pilgrims with their pilgrimage priest can have mass along the main church hall or at the several small chapels in it upon appointment and scheduling for a small fee.

    The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jersusalem (traditionaly is where Jesus was crucified and was buried) and the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem maybe the most famous Christian Sites in the Holy Land, but the Basilica of the Annunciation is the Largest Christian Church in the Middle East. The Church is located in the center of the City of Nazareth, on Casa Nova Street. It stands over the site that was believed to be the site of Mary's house, where angel Gabriel appeared and announced to Mary that she is about to give birth of Jesus (Luke 1). This current church was rebuilt in 1969 and stands at 4 previous Byzantine and Crusader Churches. The church is the traditional site of the Annunciation of Mary and her house is located at the lower level of the church. Roman Catholics and Protestants and Evengelicals consider this site as the traditional site while the Orthodox Churches have an alternate site built along the Mary's Spring, Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation was erected at that alternate site.

    the church is open to the public from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm everyday and is under the custody of the Franciscan Roman Catholic Order.

    according to wikipedia:

    The church was established at the site where, according to Roman Catholic tradition, the Annunciation took place. Greek Orthodox tradition holds that this event occurred while Mary was drawing water from a local spring in Nazareth, and the Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation was erected at that alternate site.

    The current church is a two-story building constructed in 1969 over the site of an earlier Byzantine-era and then Crusader-era church. Inside, the lower level contains the Grotto of the Annunciation, believed by many Christians to be the remains of the original childhood home of Mary. Under Roman Catholic canon law, the church enjoys the status of a minor basilica.[1] A historically significant site, considered sacred within some circles of Christianity, particularly Catholicism, the basilica attracts many Catholic, Anglican, and Eastern Orthodox Christian visitors every year.

    The first shrine was probably built sometime in the middle of the 4th century, comprising an altar in the cave in which Mary had lived. A larger structure was commissioned by Emperor Constantine I, who had directed his mother, Saint Helena, to found churches commemorating important events in Jesus Christ's life. The Church of the Annunciation was founded around the same time as the Church of the Nativity (the birthplace) and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre (the tomb). Some version of it was known to have still been in existence around 570 AD, but it was destroyed in the 7th century after the Muslim conquest of Palestine.[citation needed]

    The second church was built over the ruins of the Byzantine era church during the Crusades, following the conquest of Nazareth by Tancred in 1102.[2] The Crusader era church was never fully completed. Five Romanesque capitals carved by artists from northern France, and discovered during excavations in 1909, had not yet been installed in 1187 when news of Saladin's victory in the Battle of Hittin reached the city.[2] Saladin granted permission to Franciscan priests to remain in Nazareth to oversee services at the church.[2]


    The Church of the Annunciation, interior (about 1925)
    In 1260, Baybars and his Mamluk army destroyed the church during their attack on Nazareth.[2] A small number of Franciscans managed to stay in Nazareth until the fall of Acre in 1291. In the three centuries that followed, the Franciscans were in and out of Nazareth, depending on the local political situation, which was constantly in flux. Franciscan accounts of this period document their expulsion in 1363, their return in 1468 and a massacre of some of their members in 1542. Local Christian families with Franciscan support helped take care of the church as well during this period.[3]

    Emir Fakr ad-Din granted the Franciscans permission to return in 1620, at which time they constructed a small structure to enclose the holy grotto that is venerated as the house of Mary.[3] In 1730, Dhaher al-Omar permitted construction of a new church, which became a central gathering place for Nazareth Latin community. The church was enlarged in 1877, and then completely demolished in 1954 to allow for the construction of a new basilica, which was completed in 1969.[3] The new basilica was designed by the Italian architect Giovanni Muzio, and built by the Israeli building firm Solel Boneh during the years 1960-69. Used by the Latin parish, it remains under the control of the Franciscans. It is the largest Christian sanctuary in the Middle East, and was dedicated in 1964 by Pope Paul VI.

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    Basilica of the Annunciation: overview 2

    by machomikemd Written Sep 5, 2013

    part two of my overview tips with more pictures around

    The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jersusalem (traditionaly is where Jesus was crucified and was buried) and the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem maybe the most famous Christian Sites in the Holy Land, but the Basilica of the Annunciation is the Largest Christian Church in the Middle East. The Church is located in the center of the City of Nazareth, on Casa Nova Street. It stands over the site that was believed to be the site of Mary's house, where angel Gabriel appeared and announced to Mary that she is about to give birth of Jesus (Luke 1). This current church was rebuilt in 1969 and stands at 4 previous Byzantine and Crusader Churches. The church is the traditional site of the Annunciation of Mary and her house is located at the lower level of the church. Roman Catholics and Protestants and Evengelicals consider this site as the traditional site while the Orthodox Churches have an alternate site built along the Mary's Spring, Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation was erected at that alternate site.

    the church is open to the public from 7:00 am to 6:00 pm everyday and is under the custody of the Franciscan Roman Catholic Order.

    according to wikipedia:

    The church was established at the site where, according to Roman Catholic tradition, the Annunciation took place. Greek Orthodox tradition holds that this event occurred while Mary was drawing water from a local spring in Nazareth, and the Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation was erected at that alternate site.

    The current church is a two-story building constructed in 1969 over the site of an earlier Byzantine-era and then Crusader-era church. Inside, the lower level contains the Grotto of the Annunciation, believed by many Christians to be the remains of the original childhood home of Mary. Under Roman Catholic canon law, the church enjoys the status of a minor basilica.[1] A historically significant site, considered sacred within some circles of Christianity, particularly Catholicism, the basilica attracts many Catholic, Anglican, and Eastern Orthodox Christian visitors every year.

    The first shrine was probably built sometime in the middle of the 4th century, comprising an altar in the cave in which Mary had lived. A larger structure was commissioned by Emperor Constantine I, who had directed his mother, Saint Helena, to found churches commemorating important events in Jesus Christ's life. The Church of the Annunciation was founded around the same time as the Church of the Nativity (the birthplace) and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre (the tomb). Some version of it was known to have still been in existence around 570 AD, but it was destroyed in the 7th century after the Muslim conquest of Palestine.[citation needed]

    The second church was built over the ruins of the Byzantine era church during the Crusades, following the conquest of Nazareth by Tancred in 1102.[2] The Crusader era church was never fully completed. Five Romanesque capitals carved by artists from northern France, and discovered during excavations in 1909, had not yet been installed in 1187 when news of Saladin's victory in the Battle of Hittin reached the city.[2] Saladin granted permission to Franciscan priests to remain in Nazareth to oversee services at the church.[2]


    The Church of the Annunciation, interior (about 1925)
    In 1260, Baybars and his Mamluk army destroyed the church during their attack on Nazareth.[2] A small number of Franciscans managed to stay in Nazareth until the fall of Acre in 1291. In the three centuries that followed, the Franciscans were in and out of Nazareth, depending on the local political situation, which was constantly in flux. Franciscan accounts of this period document their expulsion in 1363, their return in 1468 and a massacre of some of their members in 1542. Local Christian families with Franciscan support helped take care of the church as well during this period.[3]

    Emir Fakr ad-Din granted the Franciscans permission to return in 1620, at which time they constructed a small structure to enclose the holy grotto that is venerated as the house of Mary.[3] In 1730, Dhaher al-Omar permitted construction of a new church, which became a central gathering place for Nazareth Latin community. The church was enlarged in 1877, and then completely demolished in 1954 to allow for the construction of a new basilica, which was completed in 1969.[3] The new basilica was designed by the Italian architect Giovanni Muzio, and built by the Israeli building firm Solel Boneh during the years 1960-69. Used by the Latin parish, it remains under the control of the Franciscans. It is the largest Christian sanctuary in the Middle East, and was dedicated in 1964 by Pope Paul VI.

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    Basilica of the Annunciation: overview

    by machomikemd Written Sep 5, 2013

    The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jersusalem (traditionaly is where Jesus was crucified and was buried) and the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem maybe the most famous Christian Sites in the Holy Land, but the Basilica of the Annunciation is the Largest Christian Church in the Middle East. The Church is located in the center of the City of Nazareth, on Casa Nova Street. It stands over the site that was believed to be the site of Mary's house, where angel Gabriel appeared and announced to Mary that she is about to give birth of Jesus (Luke 1). This current church was rebuilt in 1969 and stands at 4 previous Byzantine and Crusader Churches. The church is the traditional site of the Annunciation of Mary and her house is located at the lower level of the church. Roman Catholics and Protestants and Evengelicals consider this site as the traditional site while the Orthodox Churches have an alternate site built along the Mary's Spring, Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation was erected at that alternate site.

    the church is open to the public from 7:00 am to 6:00 pm everyday and is under the custody of the Franciscan Roman Catholic Order.

    according to wikipedia:

    The church was established at the site where, according to Roman Catholic tradition, the Annunciation took place. Greek Orthodox tradition holds that this event occurred while Mary was drawing water from a local spring in Nazareth, and the Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation was erected at that alternate site.

    The current church is a two-story building constructed in 1969 over the site of an earlier Byzantine-era and then Crusader-era church. Inside, the lower level contains the Grotto of the Annunciation, believed by many Christians to be the remains of the original childhood home of Mary. Under Roman Catholic canon law, the church enjoys the status of a minor basilica.[1] A historically significant site, considered sacred within some circles of Christianity, particularly Catholicism, the basilica attracts many Catholic, Anglican, and Eastern Orthodox Christian visitors every year.

    The first shrine was probably built sometime in the middle of the 4th century, comprising an altar in the cave in which Mary had lived. A larger structure was commissioned by Emperor Constantine I, who had directed his mother, Saint Helena, to found churches commemorating important events in Jesus Christ's life. The Church of the Annunciation was founded around the same time as the Church of the Nativity (the birthplace) and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre (the tomb). Some version of it was known to have still been in existence around 570 AD, but it was destroyed in the 7th century after the Muslim conquest of Palestine.[citation needed]

    The second church was built over the ruins of the Byzantine era church during the Crusades, following the conquest of Nazareth by Tancred in 1102.[2] The Crusader era church was never fully completed. Five Romanesque capitals carved by artists from northern France, and discovered during excavations in 1909, had not yet been installed in 1187 when news of Saladin's victory in the Battle of Hittin reached the city.[2] Saladin granted permission to Franciscan priests to remain in Nazareth to oversee services at the church.[2]


    The Church of the Annunciation, interior (about 1925)
    In 1260, Baybars and his Mamluk army destroyed the church during their attack on Nazareth.[2] A small number of Franciscans managed to stay in Nazareth until the fall of Acre in 1291. In the three centuries that followed, the Franciscans were in and out of Nazareth, depending on the local political situation, which was constantly in flux. Franciscan accounts of this period document their expulsion in 1363, their return in 1468 and a massacre of some of their members in 1542. Local Christian families with Franciscan support helped take care of the church as well during this period.[3]

    Emir Fakr ad-Din granted the Franciscans permission to return in 1620, at which time they constructed a small structure to enclose the holy grotto that is venerated as the house of Mary.[3] In 1730, Dhaher al-Omar permitted construction of a new church, which became a central gathering place for Nazareth Latin community. The church was enlarged in 1877, and then completely demolished in 1954 to allow for the construction of a new basilica, which was completed in 1969.[3] The new basilica was designed by the Italian architect Giovanni Muzio, and built by the Israeli building firm Solel Boneh during the years 1960-69. Used by the Latin parish, it remains under the control of the Franciscans. It is the largest Christian sanctuary in the Middle East, and was dedicated in 1964 by Pope Paul VI.

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    Mount Precipice 2

    by machomikemd Written Sep 4, 2013

    Part two of my tips with panoramic photos

    Mount Precipice (also known as also known as Mount of Precipitation, Mount of the Leap of the Lord and Mount Kedumim) is located along located south of Nazareth, on the cliffs of Mt Kedumim (397M), overlooking the Yizrael Valley and Mount Tabor. This mountain is one of the Christian Pilgrimage Sites in Nazareth as this Mountain according to Biblical Sources, is the site of the Rejection of Jesus described in Luke 4:29-30 of which "The people of Nazareth, not accepting Jesus as Messiah tried to push him from the mountain, but "he passed through the midst of them and went away.". The mountain is located 2 kilometers (1 1/4 miles) south of Nazareth City Proper, along Highway 60 and the mountain was the site that Pope Benedict XVI celebrated mass in 2009 and where a large tent like structure was built for the celebration of the mass.

    Our Hotel, the Golden Crown is just a stone's throw away from the top of this mountain.

    panoramic view 1 panoramic view 2 panoramic view 3 walking along to the top the tent where pope benedict held mass
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    Mount Precipice 1

    by machomikemd Written Sep 4, 2013

    Mount Precipice (also known as also known as Mount of Precipitation, Mount of the Leap of the Lord and Mount Kedumim) is located along located south of Nazareth, on the cliffs of Mt Kedumim (397M), overlooking the Yizrael Valley and Mount Tabor. This mountain is one of the Christian Pilgrimage Sites in Nazareth as this Mountain according to Biblical Sources, is the site of the Rejection of Jesus described in Luke 4:29-30 of which "The people of Nazareth, not accepting Jesus as Messiah tried to push him from the mountain, but "he passed through the midst of them and went away.". The mountain is located 2 kilometers (1 1/4 miles) south of Nazareth City Proper, along Highway 60 and the mountain was the site that Pope Benedict XVI celebrated mass in 2009 and where a large tent like structure was built for the celebration of the mass.

    Our Hotel, the Golden Crown is just a stone's throw away from the top of this mountain.

    view of mount tabor from top located beside highway 60 climbing to the top marker view of nazareth
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    Jezreel Valley

    by machomikemd Written Sep 4, 2013

    The Jezreel Valley Surrounds the Mountain City of Nazareth. The Valley is part of the Lower Galilee Region and is considered the most fertile plain in Israel and the West Bank. Many of Israel's Farm produce, vegetables and fruits come from this fertile valley and the Beit Shan Valley beside It. From a biblica perspective if you are a christian, this will be the site of Armageddon as the revelations in the New Testament of the Christian Bible as Tel Megiddo (more known by the Greek name Armageddon) is located in the middle of the Jezreel Valley. Other biblical sites along the Jezreel Valley include Jezreel, Megiddo, Beit She'an Shimron and Afula and there were great battled between the Egyptians and Canaanites and the Kingdom of Judah in these plains in different ages.

    according to wikipedai:

    According to the Bible, the valley was the scene of a victory by the Israelites, led by Gideon, against the Midianites, the Amalekiltes, and the Children of the East,[5] but was later the location at which the Israelites, led by King Saul, were defeated by the Philistines.[6] According to textual scholars, the account of a Philistine victory at Jezreel derives from the monarchial source, in contrast to the republican source, which places the Philistine victory against the Israelites at Mount Gilboa.[7][8] In Christian Eschatology, the part of the valley on which the Battle of Megiddo was fought is believed to be destined to be the site of the penultimate battle between good and evil (the final battle taking place 1,000 years later in Jerusalem),[9] known as Armageddon (a word derived from Megiddo).

    As recounted in 2Kings 9:1–10, after Jehu kills King Jehoram, he confronts Jezebel in Jezreel and urges her eunuchs to kill Jezebel by throwing her out of a window. They comply, tossing her out the window and leaving her in the street to be eaten by dogs. Only Jezebel's skull, feet, and hands remained.

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  • INTERNATIONAL CENTER MARY OF NAZARETH

    by AULIAC Updated Jul 24, 2013

    A wonderful place with archaeological site with remains of house fro, Jesus' time, A botanical garden roof with a breathtaking view of the whole town of Nazareth. A Chapel with a view opened toward the Basilica with beautiful icons Russian-byzantine-orthodox style of all the mystery of the Rosary. A multimedia show with fusion of the Bible and modern technology not to mention a beautiful music (many languages are available)
    Beautiful place, relaxing, amazing film even for children; beautiful home and welcoming. Place to see that you are a believer or not. Actually open to all.
    Opportunity to see the multimedia show in the evening on request. Relaxing, moving, place to rejoice photographers. I really recommend it was for me the best moment in Nazareth by the beauty of the place and the message transmitted by the multimedia. I hopes to get you a few minutes to go !

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    Basilica of the Annunciation

    by crazyman2 Written Jun 14, 2012

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    This is the spot where Gabriel appeared to Mary. Of course, there have neen a number of churches over the site during the centuries ---this is the fifth to be built here!

    The religious artwork is amazing: stained glass, mosaics, sculptures, murals and the architecture.

    The grotto contains columns which are supposed to have special powers; perhaps these are linked with the idea that Mary, Joseph and Jesus are supposed to have returned here...

    Would I revisit? Yes!

    Opening times
    08:30--11:45, 14:00--17:50 Mon to Sat
    14:00--17:30 Sun

    the basilica of the annunciation the grotto there is so much stained glass murals murals

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  • Nazareth Village

    by RuXTaR Written May 17, 2012

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    Nazareth Village is a walk through museum which recreates life the way it was in the first century. They restored a first century vineyard and built replicas of houses, fully functioning olive press, synagogue, and watchtower. They also show the only first century wine-press to be discovered in nazareth and explain about pressing grapes.
    The local tour guide explains about many things from olive trees to the threshing floor, the tomb, the cistern, and many other things as he shows them. They also have a carpenter's house and a weaver's house. Almost in every station of the one house fifteen minutes tour the tour guide makes a connection between what he shows and the Bible. It really brings the scripture to life.
    There is also the option of having a Biblical meal on location if booked before hand. It is best if one makes a booking so they have a tour guide to show you around.
    It is also a great place for families, the kids can feed the goats and sheep, they see donkeys and the actors are very friendly. It really is like traveling back in time!

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    Mount of Precipice

    by iblatt Updated Jan 7, 2012

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    On the southern edge of Nazareth, Mt. Precipice looks over the green, fertile Jezreel Valley.
    According to Christian tradition, the residents of Nazareth were infuriated by Jesus's sermon when he declared himself as Messiah, and the angry mob pushed him to the edge of this mountain. However, Jesus jumped off safely.

    This mountain has been sacred to Christians for many centuries. You can come here either as a pilgrim or simply to enjoy the magnificent view from the observation point: From a height of 397 meters the Jezreel Valley spreads below you, the Carmel mountains can be seen to the southwest, and Mt. Tabor is clearly visible to the east.
    The JNF arranged a short walking trail between two observation points.

    View of Jezreel Valley from Mt. Precipice Mt. Precipice: Observation point Mount Precipice, Nazareth Mt. Precipice observation point Mt. Tabor viewed from Mt. Precipice
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    St. Joseph's Church

    by iblatt Updated Jan 6, 2012

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    As you complete your tour of the Basilica of Annunciation, continue to the far end of the basilica complex. There you will find St. Joseph's Church.

    The first church was constructed here in the Byzantine period (5th century), and at that time it was not associated with Joseph. Travelers in the 7th century pointed this place out as the location of the carpentry shop of Joseph; later traditions associated the same location as the house of Joseph. In the Crusader period, in the 12th century, a church was built here and later destroyed. The Franciscans bought the area in the 18th century, and built the present church in 1914. It is built in a neo-Romanesque style.

    The entrance level is the prayer hall. Down in the crypt you will find remnants of caves, wells and granaries from Nazareth village of the 1st and 2nd centuries BC.

    St. Joseph's Church: Interior St. Joseph's Church, Nazareth St. Joseph's Church: Exterior St. Joseph's Church: Entrance sign
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    Mensa Christi Church

    by iblatt Written Jan 1, 2012

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    This church's claim to fame is a stone table which served, according to popular tradition, as the table on which Jesus and his disciples dined. Hence the name: "Table of Christ" in Latin.

    The location became popular in the 17th century, the Franciscan built a chapel here in the 18th century, and the church was rebuilt in 1860. In the past pilgrims used to break small chips off the stone table as souvenirs!

    By the way, the municipality put a new, shining explanatory sign near the gate, but the English text came out somewhat scrambled (see photo)...

    Mensa Christi Church, Nazareth Entrance to Mensa Christi Church Entrance sign, Mensa Christi Church
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    The Synagogue Church

    by iblatt Written Dec 29, 2011

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    According to the New Testament, Jesus preached in a synagogue in Nazareth, the one in which he used to study and pray. This was where he first told the astonished Nazareth villagers that he was actually the Messiah., and aroused their anger. On the traditional site of this ancient synagogue a church was first built in the 12th century.

    The church's location is unusual, set in the midst of the Nazareth market. You enter the gate, descend about a meter underground, and enter a small praying room with a concave ceiling, a few benches and a small altar. It is small, yet unique and atmospheric.

    Adjacent to the Synagogue Church is the Greek Catholic parish church,built in 1887.

    Synagogue Church: Interior Synagogue Church: Altar Synagogue Church entrance & Greek Catholic church Synagogue Church: Entrance sign
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    Mosaics in the Basilica of Annunciation

    by iblatt Updated Dec 28, 2011

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    One of the remarkable features of the Basilica of Annunciation in Nazareth is an exhibition of mosaics from all over the world, depicting the same theme of the Virgin Mary.
    Each one brings the flavor of its country of origin: Japan, Indonesia, Spain, Ireland, Brazil...
    The Brazilian Madonna appears in a fishermen's net, with the two fishermen as prominent as her. The Japanese Madonna wears a beautiful kimono, as does baby Jesus in her arms.

    Some of these mosaics are displayed in the lower courtyard, in a long covered corridor along the outside wall; other mosaics are on display in the Upper Basilica.
    They attract many visitors, and are popular with tourists from all corners of the globe, who like to have their photo taken with "their" Madonna, or with other Madonna mosaics which appeal to them.

    Japanese Madonna and child mosaic Thai Virgin Mary and Jesus mosaic Mosaic of the Indonesian Madonna Irish mosaic of the Virgin Mary
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