Outside the Wall, Jerusalem

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  • Outside the Wall
    by machomikemd
  • Outside the Wall
    by machomikemd
  • Outside the Wall
    by machomikemd
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    Yeusefiya Muslim Cemetery

    by machomikemd Written Oct 11, 2013
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    just outside the City Walls, a stone's throw away from the Rockefeller Musuem and near the Lion's Gate is the Muslim Arab Yeusifiya Cemetery. The Cemetery is just beside the entrance of the muslim quarter in the Lion's Gate and inside are some of the graves of old arabic and palestinian residents of Jerusalem and the cemetery has a high retaining wall and a steel gate with Islamic Markings. you can enter inside and see the Islamic gravesite architecture.

    address is at: Derech Jericho Street, East Jerusalem (beside the Lion's Gate).

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    A photo, a story: Mea Shearim

    by roberto.baglioni Written Aug 19, 2011
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    This threatening warnings mark the entrance of the ultra-orthodox neighborhood of Mea Shearim.
    "To girls and women we beg with our all hearts: Please do not pass through our neighborhood with immodest clothes", then the list of immodest clothes follows. Interesting also to see, in the last sentence, that the word GOD is spelled G-D, because religious jews refrain from say the word god even in english.

    The neighborhood was founded in 1874 by a group of jews determined to leave the overcrowded old city. For security reasons the quarter was walled and the gates were closed in the even.

    The inhabitants of Mea Shearim strictly adhere to the precepts of judaism and devote all their lives to praying and studying the holy texts, and also to make children as much as they can, and the natality rate is one of the highest in the world. The people here dress like the jews used to do in the shtetl of eastern europe in the past. Long black coats with hats for men, and modest clothes with long sleeves and stokings for the women, even in the heat of summer.
    Married women always cover the head with scarves or something like that, because they cannot show hair to strangers. Otherwise, there is a shortcut: the rule permits to cut the hair and wear a wig. It is a nice trick: in this way they save both the precept and the look!

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    Take an interesting walk 1

    by unaS Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    YMCA Tower
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    Can be done in an hour, but pleasanter to spend some time strolling along.

    Look up, see the interesting architecture, the combination of the old and the new. The renovation of the oldest parts of the new city, redone to meld in beautifully with the old city that it touches shoulders with…

    Begin at the YMCA on King David Street, just across from the King David Hotel. Built to include and respect the three major religions represented in Jerusalem; Christianity, Judaism and Islam. It is a community center, a cultural center with a concert hall (magnificent acoustics) and a hotel.

    The pillars tell the story of the Bible, the New Testament and the Koran. Look at them carefully. Note the symbols. The doorway with its pillars and symbols welcome all.

    The building is in three sections: Physical, Cultural and Spiritual. The tower in the center is the spiritual. Ask at the desk to climb up to the top of the tower, look out over Jerusalem and understand…

    After your visit here, cross King David street, turn left. On the corner turn right and walk down Emile Botta Street in the direction of the Old City. You pass some very interesting buildings behind high walls that can still be seen through the gates; The Pontifical Biblical Institute is especially interesting. Note also the large French Consulate building.

    Turn left at the end of Emile Botta and walk up the outside of David Village to the stairs, climb them and turn right towards the old city. Walk along the new pedestrian pathway through this unique residential section. Stop for a cup of coffee and enjoy the view.

    Watch for the Church of St. Vincent De Paul on your left. Continue on – it leads directly to the Jaffa Gate of the old city both architecturally and geographically.

    You can then either enter the old city or turn left and walk back up to Jaffa Road.

    (More photos on the T'log - Interesting walks in Jerusalem1.)

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    En Kerem

    by Sharon Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    A must see in Jerusalem !!

    One of the well hidden treasures of Israel is Ein Kerem. It is a wonderful ancient village which located in a valley like a pearl in a shell. En Kerem contains traces of settlement dating back 8000 years.
    The picturesque village is full of winding lanes, enchanting architectural features & lush green gardens. It is really a pure fantastic little place not to be missed !!
    En Kerem is believed by scholars to be the place which the Bible refers to as Beit HaKerem. In the book of the Mishna, it is mentioned that the stone for the altar of the first Temple were taken from Ein Kerem.
    We have seven monasteries and convents inspired by various traditions. It is said that John the Baptist was born here and that Mary drank from the Spring of the Virgin, still bubbling from a cave at an abandoned mosque near the center of the village.

    **(taken from a website about En Kerem)

    The area contains a biblical Museum which shows how life were in the biblical times...

    Ein-Kerem A-9, Jerusalem 95744,

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    Notre Dame of Jerusalem Center

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 16, 2010

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    Notre Dame of Jerusalem Center
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    U/C
    You can watch my high resolution photo of Jerusalem on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 31° 46' 47.55" N 35° 13' 34.56" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Notre Dame of Jerusalem Center.

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    Church in Gethsemanne

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 16, 2010

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    Church in Gethsemanne
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    I haven’t found still the name of this church in the Kedron Valley which is located opposite the Tomb of Virgin. So I think this tip is under construction, haha!

    You can watch my high resolution photo of Jerusalem on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 31° 46' 47.95" N 35° 14' 22.22" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Church in Gethsemanne.

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    Ophel Archeological Garden

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 16, 2010

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    Ophel Archeological Garden
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    The Ophel Archeological Garden, revealing 2,500 years of Jerusalem's history in 25 layers of ruins, remnants of the structures of the cities successive rulers. This site is located below the southeastern corner of the Temple Mount.
    To the right of the Western Wall Plaza are the archaeological excavations at the foot of the Temple Mount. You can visit on your own, or make arrangements for a guided tour in English if you call ahead.
    Tel: 627-7550
    Hours: Sun-Thu: 08:00-17:00 Fri: 08:00-14:00
    Admission: 30 NIS adults; 16 NIS children/seniors/students

    You can watch my high resolution photo of Jerusalem on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 31° 46' 30.09" N 35° 14' 9.40" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Ophel Archeological Garden.

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    Tomb of Zechariah

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 16, 2010

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    Tomb of Zechariah
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    The Tomb of Zechariah is an ancient stone monument adjacent to the Bene Hazir tomb.
    The monument is a monolith -- it is completely carved out of the solid rock and does not contain a burial chamber.

    You can watch my 2 min 23 sec HD Video Jerusalem Tombs of Zecharia, Bene Hezir and Absalom out of my Youtube channel.

    You can watch my high resolution photo of Jerusalem on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 31° 46' 36.69" N 35° 14' 19.75" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Tomb of Zechariah.

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    Tomb of Bene Hezir

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 16, 2010

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    Tomb of Bene Hezir
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    A cluster of tombs built into the rock on the foothills of Mount of Olives, the resting place of the Cohen family of Bene Hezir. This cluster is adjacent to the tomb of Zechariahin the Kidron valley, and facing the temple mount. It is cut into the rock and made entirely from the rock.

    You can watch my high resolution photo of Jerusalem on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 31° 46' 36.69" N 35° 14' 19.75" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Tomb of Bene Hezir.

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    Tomb of Absalom

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 16, 2010

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    Tomb of Absalom
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    Tomb of Absalom is an ancient stone monument with a conical roof located in the Kidron Valley. Although traditionally ascribed to Absalom, the rebellious son of King David of Israel (circa 1000 B.C.E.), and recent scholarship has attributed it to the first century C.E.

    Absalom's Pillar is approximately 14 meter in height. The lower half of the monument is a solid, monolithic block, about twenty feet square by twenty-one feet high, surrounded on three sides by passageways which separate it from the walls of the cliff of the Mount of Olives.

    You can watch my high resolution photo of Jerusalem on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 31° 46' 37.51" N 35° 14' 20.06" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Tomb of Absalom.

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    Russian Church of the Ascension

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 16, 2010

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    Russian Church of the Ascension

    The Russian Orthodox Convent of the Ascension is located in the village of A-Tur on Mt Olives. According to Orthodox tradition is the site where Jesus ascended to heaven 40 days after resurrection.
    The Russian Orthodox convent and church was built in 1870-1887. It was one of the Holy Land projects that were originated by Archimandrite Antonin Kapustin, as part of the Russians to expand their presence in the land and the Holy city.

    A 64 meter high bell tower was designed to symbolize the ascension to heaven. It added a remarkable landmark in the Jerusalem's skyline, as seen on the right. It was the first Christian bell to operate in Jerusalem.

    You can watch my high resolution photo of Jerusalem on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 31° 46' 28.74" N 35° 14' 0.59" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Russian Church of the Ascension.

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    Church of Mary Magdalene interior

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 16, 2010

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    Church of Mary Magdalene interior
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    The church is worth a close-up visit as well, for it stands in a tranquil garden and is filled with Orthodox icons and wall paintings inside.
    The crypt holds the remains of Tsar Alexander's mother, the Grand Duchess Elizabeth, who was killed in the Russian revolution of 1917.
    Also buried here is Princess Alice of Greece (Queen Elizabeth's mother-in-law), who harbored Jews during the Nazi occupation of Greece.

    You can watch my 3 min 36 sec HD Video Jerusalem Gethsemane Church of Maria Magdalene out of my Youtube channel.

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    Church of Mary Magdalene

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 16, 2010

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    Church of Mary Magdalene
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    The 19th-century Church of Mary Magdalene is a distinctive Jerusalem landmark on the Mount of Olives.

    It was built by Tsar Alexander III in 1888 in the traditional Russian style. Easily spotted from the Temple Mount, the Russian church's seven golden domes have been newly gilded and sparkle in the sun. Combined with its multiple levels and sculpted white turrets, the church looks like something out of a fairytale.
    It was constructed to David Grimm's design in the traditional tented roof style popular in 16th and 17th century Russia, and includes seven distinctive, gilded onion domes.

    You can watch my high resolution photo of Jerusalem on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 31° 46' 44.50" N 35° 14' 26.35" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Church of Mary Magdalene.

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    The only existing ghetto

    by talmid Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Main entrance to Mea-Shearim

    If you are in Jerusalem, do not miss the chance to visit Mea-Shearim. This is the home of the Jews who practice their religion as their ancestors did centuries ago, with strict adherence to their religious laws and traditions. It is like traveling in time and space back to the old ghettos in the European Middle Ages. Religious extremism exists here, but if you respect their style of life and customs, the ultra-orthodox jews (Harediim, in Hebrew) will only look at you with some curiosity.

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    Interesting Walk 2

    by unaS Updated Jan 6, 2010

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    The Sultanate crown
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    The Ministry of Health building was originally a 2-story villa belonging to a private family.
    When the only son died on his marriage day the family for some unknown reason propped up his body in the marriage hall. The horror was widespread. The family was forced to abandon the building. No one else would use it either and it remained empty for many years; it was then known as "the cursed building".

    Left empty for many years, during the Ottoman era the Turkish government finally took it over and made it into a hospital.
    The symbol of the Turkish Sultanate can still be seen on the 'crown' added to the building on the top floor.

    On Jaffa Road near Mahane Yehuda open market.

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