Outside the Wall, Jerusalem

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  • Outside the Wall
    by machomikemd
  • Outside the Wall
    by machomikemd
  • Outside the Wall
    by machomikemd
  • unaS's Profile Photo

    Traditional Jerusalem Courtyard

    by unaS Updated May 28, 2009

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    Passage. Note large blue sign. Entry to Courtyard
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    In old Jerusalem building was around water sources.
    They would dig a well and build around it forming a common courtyard.
    The well was held in common for use by all. Almost all were one-story buildings.

    Later a 2nd story was sometimes added.

    Today these wells have long run dry, are covered and not used, but the buildings in some cases remain.

    The old 'Jerusalem Courtyard' a traditional form of living, disappeared with the appearance of modern plumbing and water piped into homes. Some still exist in their original form.

    This one houses small flats, the Museum of Psalms and a synagogue.

    It is located on Rabbi Kook ( HaRav Kook ) Street, between Jaffa Road and HaNeviim Street.
    The entry is on the right, at the beginning of the passage way. Look for the blue sign that explains the occurrence of these special courtyards in Jerusalem only.

    At the far end of the same passageway, turn left for the lovely Anna Ticho House and dairy restaurant.

    Free entrance. Call for an appointment if you want to visit the museum.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Women's Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Italian Hospital [more]

    by FruitLover Updated Jun 1, 2008

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    This building belongs to the Florentine-style, with elements from the Palazzo Vecchio and the Medici Chapel in Florence and Palazzo Pubblico in Siena .
    Today it is the house of offices of Ministry of Education.

    Location: HaNevi'em[=the Prophet] St.

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    • Architecture

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    Italian Hospital

    by FruitLover Updated Jun 1, 2008

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    This building belongs to the Florentine-style, with elements from the Palazzo Vecchio and the Medici Chapel in Florence and Palazzo Pubblico in Siena .
    Today it is the house of offices of Ministry of Education.

    Location: HaNevi'em[=the Prophet] St.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    St Georges Cathedral -Oxford in Jerusalem

    by FruitLover Updated Feb 1, 2008

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    St Georges Cathedral, Jerusalem
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    The college & cathedral of St Georges immitate the Gothic style of the English colleges from the 14th & 15th centuries.

    The design reminds, generally, the New College in Oxford, while the Bells Tower is almost a copy of Magdalen College Tower of Oxford.

    This Anglican cathedral, established in 1899. is the seat of the Bishop of Jerusalem of the Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East.

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    • Religious Travel

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  • Restaurants? Sheyan...?

    by fleh Written Jun 6, 2007

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    Our experience with this restaurant has been sub-par to say the least. The food was overpriced and not very special. The chicken specials are 90 shekel, much more than any other item on the menu (even the entrecote), without being more special, just with different vegetables. This would not be a problem, except that the waitress pushed the specials at every chance, without ever mentioning the secret price hike.

    If this was not enough to make the evening uncomfortable, the Maitre D' was terribly rude when we mentioned that the wine was not fresh. She came over and gave us an extremely hard time about our complaint, standing like an imposing schoolteacher over a young student. For such an expensive restaurant, I expect the wine to be good, and the Maitre D' to be polite. I would let her jeans and open shirt go if she did not carry so much attitude with it.

    The restauant below Sheyan, also run by the same Maitre D' served us undercooked liver a few months ago, which made us very ill. We made a mistake by going back.

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    Museum for Islamic Art

    by FruitLover Updated Apr 2, 2007

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    Artworks of old and modern Muslim artists, including from Spain, India and China.

    Unfortunately, photographing is not allowed inside the museum.
    And that's the only picture I took.

    For a long time before the discovery of the arabic manuscripts it was thought that Chess originated from Persia, however virtually all of the arabic texts claimed that chess arrived from India (via Persia). This was the primary reason that the origin of chess is now stated to be India.

    Address: 2 Ha-Palmach St

    Directions:
    Talbiya, West Jerusalem,
    about 500 m from President's residence.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    The Pontifical Biblical Institute of Jerusalem

    by FruitLover Updated Mar 14, 2007

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    The Pontifical Biblical Institute of Jerusalem

    Not in Egypt,
    a real 2,400 years mummy in Jerusalem, in the
    Pontifical Biblical Institute of Jerusalem,
    of young boy from Alexandria,
    with a nickname 'Alex'.

    In the archeological museum you can explore a collection of various artifacts especially from the Chalcolithic Period.

    Mailing Address: P.O. Box 497, Jerusalem 91004

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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    Gan Pa'amon HaDror - Liberty Bell Garden

    by FruitLover Updated Mar 12, 2007

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    Liberty Bell Garden
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    Big city garden dedicated to the 200th independence year of United State of America, as a gesture of gratitude to USA's assistance to emergent State of Israel.

    The bell in the center of the park is a copy of Liberty Bell located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (one of the most prominent symbols associated with the American Revolution, Independence War and Liberty's ideals).

    The quotation written on the bell, taken from the Holy Bible, Leviticus, XXV, 10:
    "...and proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof..."

    The garden located in the center of Jerusalem, close to Keren HaYsod & King David streets junction.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

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    Thabor House

    by FruitLover Updated Mar 10, 2007

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    Thabor House
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    The private residence of the German (of 19th Century) Architect and scholar Conrad Schick, who named his creation after Psalms 89:13 ("Thabor and Hermon shall rejoice in thy name").

    Construction lasted from 1882 to 1889.

    Different European stylistic elements, such as may be seen in the entry gate (German Medieval Castle's Gate), are fused with local technologies and archaeological finds.

    Today houses the Swedish Theological Institute.

    Location: HaNevi'im(Prophets) St.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Skyscraper from the beginning of 20th century

    by FruitLover Updated Mar 10, 2007

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    100 years old skyscraper & Sun Watch

    This building houses the sinaguoge "zoharey hammah" ["sunsine lights"] and a guesthouse.
    Located in Jaffa st, close to Mahneh Yehudah market, in one of the highest points of the city - people used to watch the sunrise from its wooden top (burned in fire at 1941).

    This sun-watch is the highlight of sun-watches in Jerusalem designed and constructed by Moshe Shapiro, autodidact astronomer, a student in Me'a-She'arim Yeshive.

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    • Historical Travel

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    Around the Jewish West walk

    by tzuki Written Dec 8, 2006

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    View from the Jewish west area. Photo by G. Urech
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    The Jewish west is busy and modern with very nice surroundings and small streets too.
    There are quiet neighbourhoods where seems so lonely against the busy life there are outside them or in the Muslim Quarter, but still a good chance for great views and typical Jewish houses, which I really enjoyed to photo during our walk.
    Was in fact so relaxing...

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Seniors

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    Palace Hotel

    by FruitLover Written Sep 9, 2006

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    This monumental building ornamented with oriental architectural details, was built in 1929 as a luxurious hotel by the Supreme Moslem Council, headed by the Mufti Haj Amin Al-Husseini.

    Since the 1930s it has been used for government offices, first by the British Mandate Authorities, and after 1948 by the State of Israel.

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    • Historical Travel

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    A Forgotten Museum

    by gilabrand Updated Apr 2, 2006

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    Rockefeller Center may be a major tourist attraction in NY, but the Rockefeller Museum in East Jerusalem gets few visitors these days. It is an archeology museum that dates back to the British Mandate. While completely low-tech, with none of the jazzy technologies of today?s museums, it is still an intriguing place. The day I took a cab over there, the driver could hardly believe his ears. ?The Rockefeller Museum?? he said. ?No one goes there anymore.? Violent attacks in and around the Old City have kept people away, but things seem to have calmed down lately. Admission, by the way, is free.

    It was 2:15 p.m. as I walked in, just as the muezzin began intoning the call to prayer from a nearby mosque. I was almost alone in the imposing stone building, a blend of British colonial and Middle Eastern architecture, built with a $2 million donation from John David Rockefeller Jr. Interest in archeology was growing, and artifacts were sent to Istanbul because Palestine lacked a museum to house them.

    The chosen site, Karm el-Sheikh, was directly across from the Old City walls. Work began in 1930, only to be halted for 3 years by the discovery of ancient graves. The museum finally opened on January 13, 1938, but the official ceremony was called off after one of the guests, a well-known British archeologist, was murdered by Arab villagers on his way to Jerusalem.

    Without being the world?s most exciting museum, the high ceilings, arched doorways, Armenian tiles, hexagonal central tower, Alhambra-inspired inner courtyard, and cavernous exhibition halls do impart a special atmosphere. Among the more interesting exhibits are carved wooden panels from al-Aqsa Mosque, a mosaic floor from Ein Gedi inscribed with an ancient curse, a 100,000-year old skeleton holding a flint scraper and a roomful of stone birds and human figures from Hisham?s Palace near Jericho.

    The halls were freezing when I was there in the winter, although I imagine a stroll through the museum might be a nice escape from the broiling heat in the summer.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits

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    Garden Tomb [2]

    by FruitLover Written Mar 29, 2006

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    The New Testimony also tells that 'at the place where Jesus was crucified, there was a garden, and in the garden a new tomb, in which no-one had ever been laid'.[John 19:41]. That garden belonged to Joseph of Arimathea, a secret disciple of Jesus, who was given special permission to bury the body of Jesus in his nearby tomb before the start of Jewish Shabbath.

    In this domain you can be standing above Jerusalem's third largest rain water cistern holding over 200,000 gallons[approx one million litres]. It is confirmed to be of pre-Christian origin, giving evidence of a working garden such as an olive grove, orchard or vineyard, at the time of Jesus

    The climax of the Grden tour:
    The Tomb.
    It was unearthed in 1867. Unfortunately its entrance had been damaged , possibly by an earthquake, and later repaired with stone blocks.
    Not all the archaeologistsagree about the date of the tomb, but on 1970 Kathleen Kenyon, a respected archaeologist' described it as a 'typical tomb of about the 1st century AD'

    The well preserved winepress was excavated in 1924 and is one of the largest found in the land of Israel. Its discovery suggests that the garden was originally an extensive vineyard, possibly the garden of that rich man, Joseph of Arimathea

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Garden Tomb and Skull hill

    by FruitLover Written Mar 29, 2006

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    This garden has preserved as a Christian holy site koz many believe it could be the garden of Joseph of Arimathea in which Jesus was buried after his crucifixion. It is maintained by an independent British charitable trust.

    It's a pleasnt obligation for me to thank my good friend Nicola (VT:freya_heaven) for telling me about this peaceful site.

    As you stand on the platform at the far end of the garden you will find yourself overlooking a bus station. To the left you see a rough cliff and to the right the northern walls of the Old City. This area was part of an ancient stone quarry. According to tradition the quarry was used by the Jews as a place of execution by stoning, and by the Romans as a crucifixion site.

    Crucifixions were usually carried out by busy roads as a visual deterrent to other potential rebels. This would have been just such a place with main roads to Damascus and Jericho. The New Testimony tells that they took Jesus out of the city bearing his own cross to 'the place of the skull' [Golgotha in Aramic, Calvary in Latin]. There He was crusified, with two robbers.

    The traditional site for that awesome event is the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, dating back to the 4th century, the time of the Emperor Constantine

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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