Church of all Nations, Jerusalem

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  • Church of all Nations
    by machomikemd
  • Church of all Nations
    by machomikemd
  • Church of all Nations
    by machomikemd
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    Made from Donations of 12 Countries (2)

    by machomikemd Written Oct 9, 2013
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    Part two of my Church of All Nations Tips with more pictures around.

    the Roman Catholic Basilica that was designed into a Byzantine Era church by the Famed Franciscan Italian Architect Antonio Barluzzi (who designed churches in Mount Tabor, Sea of Galilee, Dominus Flevit Church) in 1924 was made possible by the Donations of 12 Nations (Italy, France, Spain, United Kingdom, Belgium, Canada, Germany, United States of America, Ireland, Hungary, Poland and Australia) and hence this formerly named Church of the Agony is now aptly named Church of All Nations. The Basilica is just located beside the Garden of Gethsemane at the foot of Mount of Olives, along the end of Palm Sunday Road in the Kidron Valley, within walking distance of the Old City. There are 12 cupolas representing the 12 countries who funded the church and although this is a roman catholic church, they provided a space at the garden of gethsemane for all christian denominations (even evangelicals) so that they can have mass or prayer sessions here. The main attraction inside the Church is the Bedrock in the middle where it was claimed, is that where Jesus Prayed Before he was arrested by the Sanhedrin. It is under the custody of the Franciscan Order.

    Opens: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm everyday
    admission is free.

    according to wikipedia:

    The current church rests on the foundations of two earlier ones, that of a small 12th century Crusader chapel abandoned in 1345, and a 4th-century Byzantine basilica, destroyed by an earthquake in 746. In 1920, during work on the foundations, a column was found two meters beneath the floor of the medieval crusader chapel. Fragments of a magnificent mosaic were also found. Following this discovery the architect immediately removed the new foundations and began excavations of the earlier church. After the remains of the Byzantine era church were fully excavated plans for the new church were altered and work continued on the current basilica from April 19, 1922 until June 1924 when it was consecrated.

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Made from Donations of 12 Countries (1)

    by machomikemd Written Oct 9, 2013
    4 more images

    the Roman Catholic Basilica that was designed into a Byzantine Era church by the Famed Franciscan Italian Architect Antonio Barluzzi (who designed churches in Mount Tabor, Sea of Galilee, Dominus Flevit Church) in 1924 was made possible by the Donations of 12 Nations (Italy, France, Spain, United Kingdom, Belgium, Canada, Germany, United States of America, Ireland, Hungary, Poland and Australia) and hence this formerly named Church of the Agony is now aptly named Church of All Nations. The Basilica is just located beside the Garden of Gethsemane at the foot of Mount of Olives, along the end of Palm Sunday Road in the Kidron Valley, within walking distance of the Old City. There are 12 cupolas representing the 12 countries who funded the church and although this is a roman catholic church, they provided a space at the garden of gethsemane for all christian denominations (even evangelicals) so that they can have mass or prayer sessions here. The main attraction inside the Church is the Bedrock in the middle where it was claimed, is that where Jesus Prayed Before he was arrested by the Sanhedrin. It is under the custody of the Franciscan Order.

    Opens: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm everyday
    admission is free.

    according to wikipedia:

    The current church rests on the foundations of two earlier ones, that of a small 12th century Crusader chapel abandoned in 1345, and a 4th-century Byzantine basilica, destroyed by an earthquake in 746. In 1920, during work on the foundations, a column was found two meters beneath the floor of the medieval crusader chapel. Fragments of a magnificent mosaic were also found. Following this discovery the architect immediately removed the new foundations and began excavations of the earlier church. After the remains of the Byzantine era church were fully excavated plans for the new church were altered and work continued on the current basilica from April 19, 1922 until June 1924 when it was consecrated.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Church of all nations

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 18, 2012

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    Church of all nations
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    This, the largest church on the Mount of Olives, is on the sight of the Garden of Gethsemane where Jesus spent praying before his arrest. The current church was built in 1920 on the sight of a 12th century crusader era church.

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  • crazyman2's Profile Photo

    Interesting place with a view

    by crazyman2 Written Jun 30, 2012
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    Do visit this Church. It is at the foot of the Mount of Olives and was built between 1919-24 using donations from 12 countries.

    The painting around the entrance is amazing and there are some interesting pieces inside.

    You can combine this with the Garden of Gethsemane.

    Would I return here? Yes.

    Opening:Mon-Sat 08:00--12:00, 14:00--17:30

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Church of all Nations

    by leffe3 Updated Jan 19, 2012

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    Built on the site of two previous churches (the first, destroyed by an earthquake in 400 CE, the second, a Crusader Church, abandoned in 1345), the Church of All Nations was built in 1924, funded by 12 countries. It's most notable for the gold-leaf mosaic that adorns its frontage, depicting Jesus carrying the suffering of the world (hence althernative name for the church is Basilica of the Agony).
    It is built within the grounds that are now accepted as the Garden of Gethsemane, the place of Jesus' betrayal and arrest.

    The Church of All Nations is to be found in the Valley of Jehoshaphat - along with many Christian sites (Tomb of the Virgin Mary, Gethsemane, Russian Church of Mary Magdalene, Church of Dominus Flavit) and is 'round the back' outside the Walls of the Old City - best reached by exiting the Old City via St Stephen's/Lion's Gate (if walking).

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  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Rock - Church of All Nations

    by Mikebb Updated Feb 5, 2011

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    Rock Where Jesus Last Prayed, Church of All Nation
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    This rock is said to be the place where Jesus prayed the night before his arrest. It was a favoured area of the church for visitors to kneel and pray.

    Photos are allowed in the Church of All Nations.

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  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    The Church of All Nations

    by Mikebb Updated Feb 5, 2011

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    Church Of All Nations.
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    We arrived mid morning hopeful of beating the crowds. There were people everywhere, however our guide was happy and I guess it becomes more crowded later in the day.

    This is a beautiful looking church built over the rock in the Garden of Gethsemane where Jesus prayed the night before his arrest.

    The church is sometimes referred to as Church of the Agony.

    There has been a series of churches on this site since the time of Jesus, often destroyed and replaced.

    The present church was built in 1924.

    Open daily:8am to noon & 2:30 to 6pm summer, 5pm winter.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Church of All Nations

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 13, 2010

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    Church of All Nations
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    The Church of All Nations is another name of the Basilica of the Agony.
    The current Church was built between 1919 and 1924 using funds donated from many different countries. The respective coat-of-arms of each donating country are incorporated into the glass of the ceiling, each in a separate, small dome, and also into the interior mosaics.

    The countries honored in this way are; starting from the left side, beginning with the apse: Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico; in the middle of the church are memorialized: Italy, France, Spain and the United Kingdom, and to the right: Belgium, Canada, Germany, and the United States of America.

    The mosaics in the apses were donated by Ireland, Hungary, and Poland. The crown around the bedrock itself was a gift of Australia.
    These multi-national donations give the church its present title as the Church of "All Nations".

    You can watch my 3 min 13 sec HD Video Jerusalem Gethsemane Church of All Nations out of my Youtube channel.

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  • wilocrek's Profile Photo

    A Symbol of Humility and Sacrifice

    by wilocrek Written Apr 9, 2009

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Church of all Nations is a very humble church that stands next to the Garden of Gethsemane. It stands a shrine and memorial to the suffering of Jesus Christ and it can't be missed in its location at the foot of the Mount of Olives. While there is nothing spectacular about the design of the church or on the inside, its simply what it represents that makes it a very special and spiritual place to visit.

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  • jadedmuse's Profile Photo

    Church of All Nations

    by jadedmuse Updated Mar 23, 2008

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Another Jerusalem landmark is the Church of All Nations, referred to as such because it was financed by twelve different countries in relatively recent times (1924). The painting on the outside of the church shows Jesus taking on the world's suffering; inside, you'll usually find tourists snapping away at the alter. Entrance is free.

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  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    Church of All Nations

    by traveloturc Written Feb 29, 2008

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    Church of all Nations

    Although this church is called also the Basilica of Agony I personally think that the basilica is adjacent to this Church.The Church of All Nations,is a Roman Catholic church located next to the Garden of Gethsemane. It enshrines a section of bedrock where Jesus is said to have prayed before his arrest, Mark 14: 32- 42.
    The chapel was built between 1919 and 1924 using funds donated from many different countries. These multi-national donations give the church it's presesnt title as the Church of "All Nations". The symbols of each country are incorporated into the glass of the ceiling, each in a separate, small dome. The facade of the church is supported by a row of corinthian columns set below a modern mosaic depicting Jesus Christ as the symbolic link between God and humanity. The bubble-domed roof, thick columns, and facade mosaic, give the church a Byzantine look architecturally.The Architech is Antonio Barluzzi ( 1924)

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  • ophiro's Profile Photo

    Church of all nations

    by ophiro Updated May 28, 2006

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    The Church of all nations (also known as Basilica of the Agony) is a beautiful fransiscan church that got its name because many countries helped to build it.
    The church is located on the mount of olives (Har Ha' Zeytim) and it was designed by an Italian architect called antonio berluzzi.

    The location of the church is also called "Gethsemane" and in Hebrew it is called "Gat Shmanim" (the place where they made oil from the olives).

    If you want to visit the church you can come everyday from 8-12 and 14-17.

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  • Sharon's Profile Photo

    Church of All nations

    by Sharon Updated Aug 21, 2005

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    Church of all nations

    This Church was built by an Italian Architect in the first quarter of the 19th century.
    Which also known as "The Basilica of the Agony" .
    The reason for the name "Chuch of all nations" is that many countries has contributed to help with the building of it.

    The Church is one of the important churches to Christianity and its quite nice while looking at it from outside though not as impressive as other churches i've seen. It is located at Gethsemane right at the foot of Mount of Olives.

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  • Bregman's Profile Photo

    Church of all Nations

    by Bregman Updated May 8, 2005

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    Church of all Nations

    Passing through the Garden of Gatsemane you will get to the Church of all Nations. The church is called like that because it was financed by 12 countries. After seeing the exterior you might be a little disappointed once you entered. As it's not that impressive from the inside.

    The church was built on top of two older churches. One from around 380 AD and the other from around 1170 AD.

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  • sswagner's Profile Photo

    Church of All Nations and Gethsemane

    by sswagner Written Jan 5, 2005

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    Church of All Nations

    This church stands on the site of the Garden of Gethsemane. This garden's fame comes from Christ's final moments before His arrest. The church is outside the city walls and faces the part of the wall lining the Temple Mount. Inside, you will find a rock at the front surrounded by wrought iron. This rock is traditionally held as the place where Jesus prayed in the garden and sweated great drops of blood. Adjacent to the church is a remaining section of the garden. Here, you will see some very old olive trees. Perhaps you can buy some olive oil from vendors nearby. When we went in September 2001, we were the only ones in the church and the garden. Imagine having a place like this to yourself to contemplate things.

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