Church of all Nations, Jerusalem

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    Church of All Nations and Gethsemane

    by sswagner Written Jan 5, 2005

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    Church of All Nations

    This church stands on the site of the Garden of Gethsemane. This garden's fame comes from Christ's final moments before His arrest. The church is outside the city walls and faces the part of the wall lining the Temple Mount. Inside, you will find a rock at the front surrounded by wrought iron. This rock is traditionally held as the place where Jesus prayed in the garden and sweated great drops of blood. Adjacent to the church is a remaining section of the garden. Here, you will see some very old olive trees. Perhaps you can buy some olive oil from vendors nearby. When we went in September 2001, we were the only ones in the church and the garden. Imagine having a place like this to yourself to contemplate things.

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  • Church of All Nations

    by oshatz Updated Nov 10, 2004
    Church of All Nations

    The Church of All Nations is at the foot of Mount of Olives. Its real name is "The Basilica of the Agony", but since the completion of the church's construction in 1924 was done through donations collected from all around the catholic world, the name "Church of All Nations" became the name mostly used.

    In this place, according to the Christian tradition, Christ prayed his last prayer, before he was turned over to the Romans by Judah.

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    The Church of All Nations

    by Goner Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The Church of All Nations

    The Church of All Nations (also known as the Basilica of Agony) is so named because its construction in 1924 was financed by twelve different countries. The church is built over 2 others, the Egenia dating from around 380, and a crusader basilica of around 1170. The Church is also notable for its Byzantine mosaic floor and the striking mosaic arches above the entrance.

    The interior of the church is built over the traditional place where Jesus prayed on the night of his betrayal.

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    Gat Shmanim Church: Ancient Olive Trees

    by FruitLover Updated Sep 10, 2006

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    Gat Shmanim Church: Ancient Olive Trees
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    Here there are eight Olive trees held by tradition to be the silent witnesses of Jesus prayer and suffering the evening before his crucification.

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    On the slopes of Mt.Olive

    by CADUM Written Mar 13, 2005
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    The church has a long history dating from the Byzantine era, the crusades, and finally a modern church.

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