Mount of Olives, Jerusalem

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    Palm Sunday Walk (Road)

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 9, 2013
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    The Palm Sunday road is a narrow and steep concrete road starting at the parking lot of the Seven Arches Hotel in the top of Mount Olives, near the Pater Noster Church and it slowly winds down to the foot of the Mount Of Olives at the Kidron Valley Below, this is the biblica Road that Jesus took when he entered Jerusalem on Palm Sunday and along the way walking down, you would see many holy sites like the Tomb of the Patriarchs, St. Mary Magdalene Russian Orthodox Church, Jewish Cemeteries, Dominus Flevit Chapel, Garden of Gethsemane, Church of All Nations and the Greek Orthodox Mary's Tomb Church. Many of the other pilgrims start their walk from the Church (now a mosque) of Acension then to the Pater Noster Church and finally going down to the main road.

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    Panoramic View of Mount of Oilves

    by machomikemd Written Oct 2, 2013
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    this will be my panomramic pictures of the mount of olives area

    Mount of Olives is a must see and is one of the main destinations in Jerusalem for Tourists and Christian Pilgrims around the world. this will be my Mount of Olives Tips, I will have separate tips on the attractions in Mount of Olives Area. Mount of Olives was formerly part of East Jerusalem (with the Old City) and the Mountain and the Old City was captures by Israel during the 1967 Six Day War and is annexed by Israel.

    The mountain lies just a stone's throw away from the walls of the Old City and besides the famous christian attractions, it also holds a large number of Jewish Graves and Prophets of the Old Testament as the mountain is also holy to the Jewish faith.

    Among the Christian Attractions in Mount of Olives is the Church of the Ascension, The Pater Noster Church, Palm Sunday Road, Dominus Flevit Church and at the foot of the mountain is the Garden of Gethsemeane and the Church of All Nationa and the Mary's Tomb Church of the Greek Orthodox. Church at the Maria Magdalene Church of the Russian Orthodox Church.

    according to wikipedia:

    The Mount of Olives or Mount Olivet (Hebrew: הַר הַזֵּיתִים, Har HaZeitim; Arabic: جبل الزيتون, الطور‎, Jabal az-Zaytūn, Aț-Țūr) is a mountain ridge east of and adjacent to the Jerusalem's Old City.[1] It is named for the olive groves that once covered its slopes. The southern part of the Mount was the necropolis of the ancient Judean kingdom.[2] The Mount is central to Jewish tradition since it has been used as a Jewish cemetery for over 3,000 years and holds approximately 150,000 graves.[3] Several key events in the life of Jesus as related in the Gospels took place on the Mount of Olives, and in the Book of Acts it is described as the place from which Jesus ascended to heaven. Because of its association with both Jesus and Mary, the Mount has been a site of Christian worship since ancient times and is today a major site of Christian pilgrimage for Orthodox, Catholic and Protestant Christians.

    The Mount of Olives is one of three peaks of a mountain ridge which runs for 3.5 kilometres (2.2 miles) just east of Old Jerusalem across the Kidron Valley, in this area called the Valley of Josaphat. The peak to its north is Mount Scopus, at 826 metres (2,710 feet), while the peak to its south is the Mount of Corruption, at 747 m (2,451 ft). The highest point on the Mount of Olives is at-Tur, at 818 m (2,684 ft)).[4] The ridge acts as a watershed, and its eastern side is the beginning of the Judean Desert.

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    Main Christian & Jewish Site in Jerusalem

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 2, 2013
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    this will be my pictures of some of the famous places in Mount of Olives

    Mount of Olives is a must see and is one of the main destinations in Jerusalem for Tourists and Christian Pilgrims around the world. this will be my Mount of Olives Tips, I will have separate tips on the attractions in Mount of Olives Area. Mount of Olives was formerly part of East Jerusalem (with the Old City) and the Mountain and the Old City was captures by Israel during the 1967 Six Day War and is annexed by Israel.

    The mountain lies just a stone's throw away from the walls of the Old City and besides the famous christian attractions, it also holds a large number of Jewish Graves and Prophets of the Old Testament as the mountain is also holy to the Jewish faith.

    Among the Christian Attractions in Mount of Olives is the Church of the Ascension, The Pater Noster Church, Palm Sunday Road, Dominus Flevit Church and at the foot of the mountain is the Garden of Gethsemeane and the Church of All Nationa and the Mary's Tomb Church of the Greek Orthodox. Church at the Maria Magdalene Church of the Russian Orthodox Church.

    according to wikipedia:

    The Mount of Olives or Mount Olivet (Hebrew: הַר הַזֵּיתִים, Har HaZeitim; Arabic: جبل الزيتون, الطور‎, Jabal az-Zaytūn, Aț-Țūr) is a mountain ridge east of and adjacent to the Jerusalem's Old City.[1] It is named for the olive groves that once covered its slopes. The southern part of the Mount was the necropolis of the ancient Judean kingdom.[2] The Mount is central to Jewish tradition since it has been used as a Jewish cemetery for over 3,000 years and holds approximately 150,000 graves.[3] Several key events in the life of Jesus as related in the Gospels took place on the Mount of Olives, and in the Book of Acts it is described as the place from which Jesus ascended to heaven. Because of its association with both Jesus and Mary, the Mount has been a site of Christian worship since ancient times and is today a major site of Christian pilgrimage for Orthodox, Catholic and Protestant Christians.

    The Mount of Olives is one of three peaks of a mountain ridge which runs for 3.5 kilometres (2.2 miles) just east of Old Jerusalem across the Kidron Valley, in this area called the Valley of Josaphat. The peak to its north is Mount Scopus, at 826 metres (2,710 feet), while the peak to its south is the Mount of Corruption, at 747 m (2,451 ft). The highest point on the Mount of Olives is at-Tur, at 818 m (2,684 ft)).[4] The ridge acts as a watershed, and its eastern side is the beginning of the Judean Desert.

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    Tomb of the Prophets

    by machomikemd Written Oct 2, 2013
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    Being a major Jewish Cemetery since the Judean Kingdom, Mount of Olives has many Jewish Cemeteries around the mountain and the most important will be the Tomb of the Prophets, which lies at the upper part of Mount of Olives and lies along the winding Palm Sunday Road. The tomb of the prophets are open from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm everyday except saturday, during the shabbat. among the prominent Bible old testament prophets buried here are Hagi, Zecheriah and Malachi, which are the last three prophets of the old testament.

    according to wikipedia:

    The Tomb of the Prophets Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi (Arabic: Qubur el Anbia) is located on the upper slope of the Mount of Olives, Jerusalem. According to Jewish and Christian tradition, the catacomb is believed to be the burial place of Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi, the last three Hebrew Bible prophets who are believed to have lived during the 5th-6th centuries BC.

    The chamber forms two concentric passages containing 38 burial niches.[1] The entrance to the large rock-cut burial cave is on the western side, where a staircase descends, flanked on both sides by a stone balustrade.[2] It leads into a large circular central vault measuring 24 ft in diameter. From it, two parallel tunnels, 5 ft wide and 10 ft high, stretch some 20 yards through the rock. A third tunnel runs in another direction. They are all connected by cross galleries, the outer one of which measures 40 yards in length.[3]

    Research shows that the complex actually dates from the 1st-century BCE, when these style of tombs came into use for Jewish burial. Some Greek inscriptions discovered at the site suggest the cave was re-used to bury foreign Christians during the 4th and 5th centuries CE.[4] On one of the side walls of the vault, a Greek inscription translates:


    Put thy faith in God, Dometila: No human creature is immortal

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    The Jewish Cemeteries

    by machomikemd Written Oct 2, 2013
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    Whil at the Mount of Olives and while walking along the Palm Sunday Road going down to the Garden of Gethsemane at the foot of the mountain, you will see many old and new Jewish Cemeteries along the Slopes of Mount of Olives and this area was an ancien Jewish Cemetery of which many were buried starting from the Judean Kingdom and many prominent prophets of the old Testament and prominent Jewish Rabbinic and Secular Figures are buried among the various tombs lining the Mountian.

    according to wikipedia:

    From Biblical times until the present, Jews have been buried on the Mount of Olives. The necropolis on the southern ridge, the location of the modern village of Silwan, was the burial place of Jerusalem's most important citizens in the period of the Biblical kings.[2] There are an estimated 150,000 graves on the Mount, including tombs traditionally associated with Zechariah and Absalom. On the upper slope, the traditional Tomb of the Prophets Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi is situated. Notable rabbis buried on the mount include Chaim ibn Attar and others from the 15th-century to present.

    Roman soldiers from the 10th Legion camped on the Mount during the Siege of Jerusalem in the year 70 CE. The religious ceremony marking the start of a new month was held on the Mount of Olives in the days of the Second Temple.[5] After the destruction of the Temple, Jews celebrated the festival of Sukkot on the Mount of Olives. They made pilgrimages to the Mount of Olives because it was 80 meters higher than the Temple Mount and offered a panoramic view of the Temple site. It became a traditional place for lamenting the Temple's destruction, especially on Tisha B'Av.[5] In 1481, an Italian Jewish pilgrim, Rabbi Meshulam Da Volterra, wrote: "And all the community of Jews, every year, goes up to Mount Zion on the day of Tisha B'Av to fast and mourn, and from there they move down along Yoshafat Valley and up to Mount of Olives. From there they see the whole Temple (the Temple Mount) and there they weep and lament the destruction of this House."[6] In the mid-1850s, the villagers of Silwan were paid £100 annually by the Jews in an effort to prevent the desecration of graves on the mount.[7]

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    Views from the Mount of Olives

    by angiebabe Written Aug 14, 2012

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    A trip to Jerusalem, especially if Christian, Muslim or Jewish, will want to include a visit to the Mount of Olives.

    A great view over the Jerusalem where the Temple on the Mount is located, the old walls that included the Gates of Jubilee, and over the Garden of Gethsemane

    My first visit here we went to an excellent souvenir shop and bought beautiful prayer shawls.

    The customary camels are up for any tourists that want to pay some shekels to be seen on a camel, and there is a small shop nearby to buy drinks and snacks.

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    Mount of Olives and the View

    by leffe3 Written Aug 9, 2012
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    For the best panoramic view of the Old City, nothing beats the Mount of Olives - even with the eyesore of the 7 Arches Hotel (simply stand on the terraces built in front of it - you'll share it with camels and tourist touts).

    You can get here as part of an organised trip (unquestionably the easiest), take a taxi or challenge yourself and walk! Up the Mount of Olives past Mary's Tomb, Garden of Gethsemane, All Nations Church, Flavius and the massed Jewish graveyard to the top.

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    Tomb Of Zechariah

    by leffe3 Updated Jan 19, 2012

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    Named after the prophet, the tomb highlights the influence of the Hellenic period. Supposedly the burial place of Zachariah, it is likely to be wrong as the tomb dates from the 1st century BC, whereas Zachariah died in the 6th century BC.

    Next to the tomb is the Tomb of B'nei Hezir - a burial cave hewn out of the rock face, the opening of which is a Greek-style pediment framed by two columns. The Hezirs were a family of Jewish priests.

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    Graves

    by leffe3 Updated Jan 19, 2012

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    Spread across the eastern slopes of the Mount of Olives (Har HaZeitim in Hebrew) is the largest Jewish cemetery in the world, with an estimated 150,000 graves, some of which have been there for more than 3000 years.

    Those in the valley floor with their ornate tombs (see following tips) are individual attractions, but those sweeping up the hillside present a mass of white stone (except at sunset) seemingly as far as the eye can see when standing among them.

    The Mount became an important Jewish site following the destruction of the Temple in 70AD - higher than Temple Mount the Jews could look across the valley to the ruins of their temple. Over time, many of the graves were desecrated, none more so than during the Jordanian control of East Jerusalem between 1948 and 1967 when an estimated 40,000 graves were vandalised with many destroyed with building of the Intercontinental Hotel (now the 7 Arches Hotel) and subsequent access road at the summit.

    But the site has been restored and the summit and 7 Arches is an important part of any tour of old Jerusalem.

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    View at seven arches hotel

    by xaver Written Jan 7, 2012

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    It si beyod the city walls to the east of Temple mount, this is one of the hills surrounding Jerusalem.The olives were cut during roman period and now the slope where olives used to be is the largest jewish cemetery of the world, having a tomb there is very expensive.
    From the mount of olives you get a great view all over old Jerusalem, ask the taxi driver to take you to Seven Arches hotel which is just in front the best panorama.

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    Mary's Tomb

    by leffe3 Updated Jul 3, 2011

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    Across the road from the Garden of Gethsemane and Church of all Nations is the claimed location by Eastern Christians of Mary's Tomb.

    Now known by some as the Church of Theotokos (as Mary is known by many), there has been a church since the 5th century. Both the original building and the later Crusader edifice were destroyed by the invading Muslims, the crypt itself was untouched (Mary is also venerated in Muslim religion as the mother of the prophet Isa).

    The entrance to the underground church is the only remains of the Crusader church and is on the same level as the Grotto of Gethsemane, a small cave to the left of the entrance claimed by some to be the actual tomb itself.

    Most Eastern Christians, however, believe the tomb to be at the bottom of the 47 stairs leading from the Crusader facade (remembering that there is a counter claim that Mary's tomb is in Ephesus in Turkey). It is here she was buried but attained ascendancy after her death (from, according to the Roman Catholics, what is now the Dormition Abbey on Mount Zion).

    The Greek Orthodox Church control the site and the surrounds leading to the alter and tomb reflect the tastes - hundreds of oil lamps suspended from the hewn-out rockface, ornate shrines and frescoes.

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    Absalom's Pillar

    by leffe3 Updated Jul 3, 2011

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    Named after one of King David's sons, with the exception of the roof, the tomb is carved out of the hillside. The tomb dates from the 1st century BC. Behind the Pillar is the tomb of Jehoshaphat – a burial cave.

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    Valley of Jehosophat

    by leffe3 Updated Jul 3, 2011

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    Below the walls of the Old City, is the 'Valley of God's Judgement' and this is where the day of Judgement will take place. You know the story (or maybe not -:)) - all mankind will assemble in the valley and two bridges will appear. Each of us will be directed to the bridge of iron or the bridge of paper. The iron bridge will collapse and that's the end of all of us on that one - those on the paper bridge will be promised eternal life.

    It seems that the above story is not so well known - many people have emailed me to ask where it came from. I have no idea where I found this reference! But checking with a Lutheran Minister friend who lives in Jerusalem (and who had not heard the story before but loved it) believes its a derivation of a story from the 2nd century of St Enoch.

    The highlight of this valley is the superb Jewish tombs, many from the time of the 2nd temple.

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    Church of Dominus Flevit

    by leffe3 Updated Jul 2, 2011

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    'The Lord Wept' is the translation of 'Dominus Flevit' and this is where Jesus is reputed to have wept for the foreseen destruction of Jerusalem.

    The church itself is not that interesting - a 1950s tear shaped building. But excavations revealed a 5th century mosaic floor (on display) from a monastery. But it's the view from the garden terrace and the famed 'framed' view of the Old City through the window of the church (found on so many postcards of Jerusalem and in personal home collections - including mine :)) that many people climb the steep allwayway from the Church of Mary Magdalene.

    Entry is free but as with the Church of Mary Magdalene, there is a strict dress code. Dominus Flevit is open daily (closed at lunchtime).

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    Russian Church of Mary Magdalene

    by leffe3 Updated Jul 2, 2011

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    One of the most distinctive of all the religious buildings in Jerusalem – the seven gilded 'onion-domed' Church of Mary Magdalene on the Mount of Olives. Part of the concentration of churches and monasteries at the base of the Mount of Olives (Gethsemane, Church of All Nations, Dominus Flevit etc), with the world's largest and oldest Jewish cemetry climbing up the hillside.

    The Russian Church of Mary Magdalene was built in 1886 (although based on the much earlier Muscovite churches of the 16th & 17th centuries) by Alexander III in memory of his mother. It is now a convent – but only open to the public on Tuesday and Thursday, 10-12 noon (free entry).

    The Church (and Mount of Olives) is easily reached through exiting St Stephen's Gate in the Muslim Quarter of the Old City or, if you want to walk round the walls from Dung Gate and the Jewish Quarter, cut through the Kidron Valley and the various tombs.

    Note there is a dress code and no shorts (men) allowed and women should dress 'respectivefully'.

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