The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem

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  • The Church of the Holy Sepulchre
    by machomikemd
  • The Church of the Holy Sepulchre
    by machomikemd
  • The Church of the Holy Sepulchre
    by machomikemd
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    Church of the Holy Sepulcher

    by antistar Updated Feb 26, 2014

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    Church of the Holy Sepulcher, Jerusalem
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    An unassuming entrance hides a massive, sprawling, awe inspiring church carved into the rock of Jerusalem, and built around the shrine which venerates the place where Jesus is believed to have been buried. The church is also meant to have been built on Golgotha, the hill upon which Jesus was crucified. As you can imagine, it is a very holy place, and the destination of many a pilgrimage.

    The Church was founded by Saint Helena, who had been instructed to build churches on all the sites touched by the life of Jesus, including the Church of the Nativity that commemorated his birth in Bethlehem. It survived for centuries, even under Muslim rule, until the "mad caliph" had it destroyed. This move caused angry reactions across Europe, and was fundamental in launching the Crusades.

    In fact the first crusade was effectively a pilgrimage to the church, and each of the crusaders came here to worship. The Crusaders later set about rebuilding the church, and their chief, Godfrey of Bouillon, declared himself "Protector of the Holy Sepulcher". After Saladin the Church fell again under Muslim rule, but he eventually allowed pilgrims to visit the church.

    Today it is home to Greek Orthodox, the Armenian Apostolic and Roman Catholic churches, and you will see clerics of all three denominations wandering about various parts of the church, conducting ceremonies. The Armenian monks were particularly fetching with their dark brown robes, and long black beards.

    Being such a holy place, on any normal day you can expect it to be packed to the rafters with pilgrims and tourists. The Sepulcher itself will have queues a mile or more long. I visited on Christmas Eve, and because everyone had been scared off by recent events in the region, I almost had the place to myself. On Christmas Eve!

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    Church of the Holy Sepulchre

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Jan 3, 2014

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    Built in 325 by Justinian, this is Jerusalem's oldest and Christianity's most sacred site. Built over what is purported to be both the cruxification and burial place of Christ. Get here early as long lines form quickly during the day.

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    Deir Al Sultan: Ethiopian Orthodox Church Claimed

    by machomikemd Written Oct 15, 2013

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    At the Rooftops of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is a Monastery Called Deir Al Sultan, which was formerly a propertic of the Coptic Church of Egypt but was captured by the Ethiopian Orthodox Church in 1970 on the infamous easter takeover and since then there were always brawls between these two Christian Denominations, the last one was in 2008. The Monastery is a shortcut to the entrance to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre Main Gate for Pilgrims.

    according to the Coptic Website:

    Deir El Sultan lies on the roof of the Holy Sepulchre instead of the ruins of the Martyrium Church. It is located between the Coptic Patriarchate premises and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre (on the east side). It expands over 1800sq.m. and consists of a courtyard with the dome of St Helena’s Chapel in the middle. There are two ancient Coptic chapels on the south-western side of the Monastery – the Chapel of the Archangel Michael and the Chapel of the Four Incorporeal Creatures. On the eastern side of the courtyard, there are some rooms in which the Copts host some Ethiopian monks, in addition the room of the Monastery’s Superior – who is a Coptic monk.

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    Coptic Patriarchate Part of The Church

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 15, 2013
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    The Huge Church of the Holy Sepulchre is divided into several sections for different Christian Sects and one of them is located at the Ninth Station of the Cross which is the Headquarters of the Coptic Patriarchate of Egypt, which extends to one of the roofs of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, The Coptic Church Descended from St. Mark the Apostle who went to egypt to evangelize and founded the Church in the 1rst Century AD. The compound at the Church of the Holy Sepulcher houses the seat of the Coptic Archbishop and three churches, Beneath the compound are rooms dating from the Middle Ages and a large water cistern from the Byzantine period. The Copts have a chapel in the Church of the Holy Sepulcher and several other buildings in the Christian Quarter.st important one of which is the Church of St. Antonius dating from the 3rd century. ( I will have tips on the Coptic Churches in Egypt at my Cairo Pages).

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    The AEDICULE

    by machomikemd Written Oct 15, 2013
    the aedicule and the rotonda
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    The Aedicule is located in a small rotunda in the Central Part of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and is considered the most important part of the Church as this is th biblical site where Jesus was buried and rose after 3 days. The aedicule consists of two chambers, the Bigger Chapel of the Angel and the very small chamber with a granite stone adorned with incense and flowers and religious items, which is the spot of the Burial Site of Jesus. The line going to the Aedicule might take 1 to 2 hours depending if there is a religous holiday and pilgrims are only allowed 10 seconds or less to go inside and pray (and take picture and videos).

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    Christianity's Most Sacred Site (2)

    by machomikemd Written Oct 15, 2013
    the holy sepulchre (jesus burial)
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    Part two of my tips with more pictures.

    We all know that Christianity's Most Sacred Site is the Church of The Holy Sepulchre as this huge church complex is the biblical site of the Crucifixion, Death, Burial and Resurrection of Jesus Christ. Many Christian Denominations have their Popes, Patriarchs, Bishops, Metropolitan Heads and more, but all of them bow to the Magnificence of the Church as this is the most holy site in Christianity. The Church has a long history of conquest, rivalries,mfights and more during it's more than 1700 years of existence as it was renovated multiple times since Saint Helena, the mother of Emperor Constantine, the first Roman Christian Emperor, made a pilgrimage to the holy land and found fragments of the true cross among the stone foundry ruins in the old walls of Jerusalem in 330 AD and she identified the site as Calvary (Golgotha). The most prominent attractions inside are the Aedicule (the burial place of Jesus hence the Holy Sepulchre), the Crucifixion Site, the stone of unction, the Jesus Prison, the Catholicon and more and are spread around the Different Christian Denomination Areas of the Church of which the Greek Orthodox Church has the Lions Share.

    The Church of the Holy Sepulchre is located in Jerusalem, between Suq Khan e-Zeit and Christian Quarter Rd. . The Church is open daily from 05:00 AM to 8:00 PM in the summer (April to September) and from 05:00 AM to 7:00 PM from October to March.

    Admission to the site of the Holy Sepulchre is free!

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    Christianity's Most Sacred Site (1)

    by machomikemd Written Oct 15, 2013
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    We all know that Christianity's Most Sacred Site is the Church of The Holy Sepulchre as this huge church complex is the biblical site of the Crucifixion, Death, Burial and Resurrection of Jesus Christ. Many Christian Denominations have their Popes, Patriarchs, Bishops, Metropolitan Heads and more, but all of them bow to the Magnificence of the Church as this is the most holy site in Christianity. The Church has a long history of conquest, rivalries,mfights and more during it's more than 1700 years of existence as it was renovated multiple times since Saint Helena, the mother of Emperor Constantine, the first Roman Christian Emperor, made a pilgrimage to the holy land and found fragments of the true cross among the stone foundry ruins in the old walls of Jerusalem in 330 AD and she identified the site as Calvary (Golgotha). The most prominent attractions inside are the Aedicule (the burial place of Jesus hence the Holy Sepulchre), the Crucifixion Site, the stone of unction, the Jesus Prison, the Catholicon and more and are spread around the Different Christian Denomination Areas of the Church of which the Greek Orthodox Church has the Lions Share.

    The Church of the Holy Sepulchre is located in Jerusalem, between Suq Khan e-Zeit and Christian Quarter Rd. . The Church is open daily from 05:00 AM to 8:00 PM in the summer (April to September) and from 05:00 AM to 7:00 PM from October to March.

    Admission to the site of the Holy Sepulchre is free!

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    The Church of the Holy Sepulcher%*

    by Goner Updated Aug 24, 2013

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    Entrance to the Holy Sepulcher

    The Church of the Holy Sepulcher was built by the Constantine (the first Roman Christian ruler) and is built over the site where Jesus was crucified, buried and resurrected. Most people arrive here after walking down the Via Dolorosa, the route Jesus followed as he carried his cross. The church, built at the beginning of the Byzantine era, is a focal point for Christian pilgrimage.

    Egyptian Monks live on the roof of the Holy Sepulcher. They lost there right to the church when a fire burned their certificate papers. The Holy Sepulcher is now divided among Ethiopians, Armenians, Copts, Greeks, Latins and Muslims. There are communal areas that are under the authority of the Armenian, Greek Orthodox, and Latin churches.

    The door keeper of the Holy Sepulcher is Muslim, this right was handed down from generation to generation in the same family. They actual control the access.

    Below the Holy Sepulcher, they have found hundreds of skulls and bones of children thought to be those of the children under the age of two that Herod had killed when he heard that a new king (Jesus) had been born.*

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    Church of the Holy Sepulchre

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 25, 2013

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    Church of the Holy Sepulchre
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    Deleted text on Barbara’s request

    You can watch my 4 min 08 sec HD Video Jerusalem Church of the Holy Sepulchre out of my Youtube channel.

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    Katholikon

    by leffe3 Updated Jun 29, 2012

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    The Greek Choir, also known as the Katholikon, is by far the largest open space in the Church.

    Although usually closed off from visitors by a chain, balconies and ornamental iconastasis are readily seen. The Greek Orthodox believe the centre of the world is located in the Katholikon, with a large urn on the floor marking the spot.

    But occasionally during the day the chain is lifted and a better perspective can be found standing under the dome and more detail is to be seen.

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    Church of the Holy Sepulchre

    by leffe3 Updated Jan 29, 2012

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    From the outside, one of the most important Christian church and focus for many pilgrmages, fails to impress.

    This is mainly due to the lack of viewpoint in the old alleyways of the old city - you turn a corner and there it is, a small open plaza leading to the main doors, the dome of the building almost hidden from street level. And even once inside it is difficult to ascertain the true enormity of the place as it is a complete warren of separate Chapels: the differing faiths within the all-encompassing term 'Christian' do not live side by side very easily (to such an extent that the key to the church is held by a local Muslim, who's responsibility it is to open the church each morning and lock it at night).

    Stories abound of the lack of co-operation between the differing groups within the church. About the only thing that is agreed on is that the church is on the site of Golgotha - the place of the crucifixion, burial and resurrection of Jesus.

    What we see today is predominantly Crusader (12th century), with additions and renovations following a fire in 1808 and a major earthquake in 1927 along with the remains of various structures built on the site since 326AD.

    It's open from 4.30am until 8pm (7pm in winter)

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    Where all Christians go

    by xaver Written Jan 7, 2012

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    Finding his church actually was not so easy, it is infact hidden in one of the many corners of the huge market that is placed all over the old town. Plus when you look at that corner you see a mosque so you do not think that proceeding a few steps further you can find the church, but this is the great side of Jerusalem, synagigues churches mosques are just one next to the other. The church is not impressive if compared with some cathedrals in Italy and europe in general but ofcourse it is one of the main symbols of the christianity. There is a que to see the sepulcher ofcourse but it takes less than you think(30 minuts during christmass period) because the man at the entrance of the sepulcher really does not let you stay more than a few seconds, so if you think to pray, just go to a quiter area of the church.

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    An Interesting Place

    by stevemt Written Mar 12, 2011

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    This church, is a maze of churches, belonging to varying denominations.

    The main denominations are Catholic, Eastern Orthodoxy & Oriental Orthodoxy.

    It is packed when open by tourists and pilgrims. There is a lot to see here, and it is very easy to miss things in the maze of chapels.

    Supposedly here there is the crusifixiation site and the burial site of Jesus, however this is up for discussion.

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    Rotunda - Church Of The Holy Sepulchre

    by Mikebb Updated Feb 6, 2011

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    Rotunda - Church of the Holy Sepulchre
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    A most beautiful section of the Church, the rotunda is built in classical Roman style. The 11th century dome was replaced after the 1808 fire when the two storey colonnade was built.

    To the back of the Rotunda is the Syrian Chapel.

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    Church Of The Holy Sepulchre

    by Mikebb Updated Feb 5, 2011

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    Church of the Holy Sepulchre - Main Entrance
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    For me this was the highlight of my day in Jerusalem. This church has so much to see and understand. The presentation is beautiful in a religious way.

    As with most of the Churches in Jerusalem, most have been rebuilt many times since the days of Jesus.

    The first basilica was built in 326 AD, rebuilt 1040's, enlarged by the Crusaders and extensive repairs required over the last 2 centuries due to earthquare and fire damage.

    This church is built around what is considered to be the site of Christ's Crucifixation,burial, and Resurrection.

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