Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial, Jerusalem

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    Yad Vashem

    by mindcrime Written Jul 11, 2014

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    We have visited many museums about Holocaust and the six million Jews that died all over the world so it would be pity to miss the official museum in Jerusalem that was established in 1953.

    Yad Vashem is actually a 45-acre campus with not only the Holocaust History museum but also a Holocaust Art museum, a synagogue, a research center, a library but also several outdoor spaces and gardens with memorials, monuments and sculptures. Located on the western slope of Mount Herzl it took us a while to reach it although the tram terminates near by. Some kind of problem left us stacked way further so we had to walk under the sun for 30’. Then we followed the path that connects military cemetery and Herzl’s grave with Yad Vashem, according to a sign we saw there it represents the journey from the Diaspora to the homeland, from catastrophe to rebirth.

    There’s no entrance fee which make it one of the most visited sites in Israel (one millions visitors a year) which means it may get packed some times. They don’t allow photography inside the museum so I cant show any of the interesting installations and settings there. It’s a modern technologically advance museum with different rooms where you can see personal items and artworks by survivors but also personal stories of some of the victims. Although its theme is on the heavy side (it can get emotional and hard) it’s so well-designed that didn’t push me too much like other museums like this and the general laid out atmosphere of the campus helped a lot on this.

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    The Holocaust writ plain

    by etfromnc Written May 27, 2014

    Unfortunately, I did not find my trip to Israel as life-changing as a lot of my friends tell me they did but the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial and Museum would have almost made the trip worthwhile all on its own. The proprietors describe it as, "The world’s leading national Holocaust memorial and museum is a 45-acre campus comprising indoor museums, outdoor monuments, memorials, gardens, sculptures and world-class research and educational centres," and I cannot disagree with that but it is so much more and I hope to expand this tip soon but if you are going to Jerusalem in the near future, do not miss Yad Vashem.

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    Holocaust memorial

    by xaver Written Jan 8, 2012

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    We were not sure to visit this memorial as it is a bit outside of the centre and taxis are not cheap, specially during the rush hours. At the end we said that we could not finish a trip in Israel without visiting the Holocaust memorial.
    Yad Yahsem, the name of this memorial, means a "hand and a name".
    It is a very modern and multimedial museum that remind you pieces of history that mos people probably forgot, remembering only aushwitz and a few more camps. Once you are outside and you start relaxing a bit from the obvious stress that all that madness createdin you, you easily end up entering a dark room, so dark that it's hard to see if there issomeone in front of you and you see some candles and a voice tells the name and the nationality and the age of the kids killed during holocaust, that, at the end made us say that any taxi price we paid would be worth the experience.

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    A photo, a story: Soldiers visit Yad Vashem

    by roberto.baglioni Written Aug 22, 2011
    Soldiers visiting Yad Vashem

    This group of soldiers has just finished visiting Yad Vashem museum.
    Yad Vashem is a mandatory stop for whom wants to understand the roots of Israeli. In the museum it is told not only the shoah but also the whole history of oppression and abuses suffered by jews in the centuries.
    The architecture of the museum is also meaningful: it is a tunnel with a shape of an acute triangle, that is half of the star of david, the other half has been annihilated in the WWII. But at the end of the tunnel, oppressive as it must be, you exit in a terrace, full of light overlooking the hills around Jerusalem. It is a moving, intense experience, enhanced by the absence of a wall, there is just a transparent protection.

    Yad Vashem remembers the evil because the evil should never happens again. Never again is the motto here. Jews wanted strongly their home here because this would never happen again.

    For this reason the soldiers, during their service, must visit the museum at least once, because here they can find the strenght and the motivation they need for their service that can possibly be hard and challanging.

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    Holocaust Museum

    by traveloturc Updated Oct 15, 2010

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    This is my second visit and after my first visit I realize that its better organized.
    A little beyond Mt. Herzl is the Israeli Holocaust museum. Yad Vashem was established by Israeli Law in 1953 to commemorate the six million Jews and their communities wiped out in the Holocaust. It has the largest and the most comprehensive archive and information repositories on the Holocaust, housing more than 50 million pages of documents and hundreds of thousands of photographs and films.The Historical and Art Museums, as well as the Hall of Remembrance, the Valley of the Communities, the Children's Memorial, and other monuments attest to the tragic events that befell the Jewish people and instruct visitors to Yad Vashem on the uniqueness of the Holocaust and its universal lessons. The Hall of Names is part of an effort to collect the names of every Jewish man, woman and child murdered in the Shoah.
    It's an honor for me of not seeing any thrace or any evidence of my country to be involve in this biggest shame of humanity....

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    Valley of the Communities

    by Martin_S. Updated Dec 28, 2006

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    Yad VeShem Valley of the Communities, Jerusalem
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    At the Yad VeShem Holocaust Museum they have added a new outdoor section called the Valley Of The Communities. This section is not devoted to the individuals, nor the families that were destroyed by Nazis in World War Two, but rather by entire COMMUNITIES that were totally wiped off the face of the earth. As you stand under each monolithic wall and read the names of towns and villages where the entire population of Jews in that community ceased to exist because of hate it brings a shiver to your spine to realize the depth of hatred the human spirit is capable of. During WWII it was the Jews, but time and time again in mans history we have destroyed entire populations if not civilizations...when will we learn

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    Yad Vashem

    by eddymario Written Aug 14, 2006

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    Yad Vashem, the national Authority for the Remembrance of the Martyrs and Heroes of the Holocaust, was established in 1953 by act of the Knesset (Israel’s parliament) to commemorate the six million Jewish men, women and children murdered by the Nazis and their collaborators during the years 1933-1945. The Authority also commemorates the heroism and fortitude of the Jewish partisans and the fighters in the Ghetto revolts, as well as the actions of the "Righteous Among the Nations" (non-Jews who saved the lives of Jews).

    Located on Har Hazikaron (Heb., Hill of Remembrance), a ridge on the western outskirts of Jerusalem, the Yad Vashem Memorial and Institute includes several commemorative monuments, an historical museum, a central archive and a research center for the documentation of the Holocaust.

    The task of Yad Vashem is to perpetuate the memory and lessons of the Holocaust for future generations.

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    Yad Va'Shem

    by ophiro Written May 28, 2006

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    Yad Va'shem is the museum to remember the horrible holocaust that 6 million jews died during WW2.

    You will find here a lot of pictures and documents from this time.

    The entrance is free and it is from 9:00-17:00 except saturday (the place is close).

    The place is very exciting and with powerful emotions.

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    Man's Inhumanity to Man

    by gilabrand Updated Feb 8, 2006

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    Train to Nowhere

    Yad Vashem - the Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Authority - is a sprawling complex of museums, archives, monuments and sculptures connected by a maze of walkways. It is the world's largest repository of information about the Holocaust.. "Shem" means name. Six million Jews (along with a fair number of gypsies, homosexuals, disabled and people with the wrong ideology) were killed in a mind-boggling example of man's inhumanity to man. The goal of Yad Vashem is to give a name to every person who died, to personalize this faceless mass, branded like cattle, numbers burned onto their arms, packed into cattle cars, and shipped off to concentration camps and gas chambers.

    “Over 100 people were packed into our…airless closed car. Everyone tried to push his way to a small air opening. I found a crack in one of the floorboards into which I pushed my nose to get a little air. The stench in the cattle car was unbearable. People were defecating in all four corners…After some time, the train suddenly stopped. A guard entered the car. He had come to rob us. He took everything that had not been well-hidden: money, watches, valuables…Water! We pleaded with the railroad workers. We would pay them well. I paid 500 zlotys and received a cup of water…I began to drink, a woman whose child had fainted attacked me. She was determined to make me leave her a little water. I did leave a bit at the bottom of the cup, and watched the child drink…The car was sweltering in the sun. The men lay half naked. Some of the women lay in their undergarments. People struggled to get some air, and some no longer moved…The train reached the camp. Many lay inert on the floor. Some were no longer alive” (from the testimony of a survivor).

    The cattle car in this photo was used by the Nazis to transport Jews to the camps. It was given to Yad Vashem by the Polish authorities in 1990. Now part of a memorial designed by Moshe Safdie, it sits on a severed railroad track jutting out over the slope of a hill, suspended between heaven and earth.

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Yad Vashem

    by leffe3 Written Jan 11, 2006

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    the new museum
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    Yad Vashem is far from easy, but is a must for any visit to Jerusalem. Over a huge site spread over the hills of Jerusalem, it's a deeply (almost unbearably) moving memorial, 'lest we never forget' and an attempt to provide a name to every victim of the genocide.

    Monuments such as the Valley of the Communities - a vast mass grave carved into the bedrock, a grave of alleys and walls towering 30' above you, walls which are carved with the names of cities, towns and villages of Europe and N. Africa from where Jews were deported. As you walk through these alleys and courtyards you feel trapped, insignificant and disorientated - a metaphorical journey through the european continent at a time of war.

    The Children's Memorial will affect even the most hardened of souls - a memorial hollowed out of an underground cave. Simple in it's presentation - a darkened room, the use of candles and mirrors representing the 1.5 million children who were the victims of The Final Solution.

    An original cattle car is at the centre of The Memorial of the Deportees, used in the transportation of millions of Jews across Europe to the death camps.

    Garden of the Righteous Among Nations is the memorial to 000s of non-Jews who risked their lives in helping during the Shoah.

    The centre piece is the Museum. This vast underground space presents an abbreviated history of anti-semitism leading up to the Holocaust and then provides a detailed history of events during the period 1930-1945. It is an extraordinary, overpowering display.

    The new museum provides an extra dimension to Yad Vashem. Previously, 2-3 hours would have been the recommended time for a tour of the site. The new museum alone could take up more than this. Ideally, 2-3 visits would be the only way to give Yad Vashem any justice, but one recommendation is to break up your time in the new Museum - take it in 2-3 parts with 'breaks' outside.

    Free entry.
    Opening hours: Sun-Thurs 9am-5pm: Fri 9am-2pm

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    The Ethernal Flame

    by StefanE Written Jul 22, 2005
    Ethernal Flame

    I where quite touched by this monument to all Jews that died in the concentration camps. It was an eerie feeling seeing the flame dancing in the dark room with the sunlight coming through the gap between the roof and wall.

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    Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum

    by freya_heaven Updated Sep 9, 2004

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    One of the Many Yad Vashem Memorials

    Yad Vashem is a very harrowing and quite upsetting place to visit, But I really believe everyone should visit places like this, in the hope atrocities on the scale like the holocaust will never happen again.

    I defy anyone to leave the childrens memorial and it not having an impression on them.

    Admission is free, open Sunday to Thursday
    Egged buses 13,17,18,20,23,24,and 27 all take you there on the Mount of Rememberance

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    yad vashem memorial.......

    by KianaInupiaq Written Nov 19, 2003
    memorial monument

    Yad = memorial......va = and.......shem = name.......... yad vashem...........it's chilling to walk in this place, to see all the pics from the holocaust, the things that drove the germans to this end I cannot even think of.....I cannot change history, I don't want to dwell on the past, the future is what holds hope for any one person, to see Israel flourish after the holocaust is amazing.

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    Yad Vashem's Historical Museum

    by sunshinee Written Oct 1, 2003

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    The museum has extensive historical informations and photos of the Holocaust. The story is presented chronologically showing the progression of Nazi anti-Jewish policies from persecution to ghettoization and finally to systematic mass murder.

    You can really learn a lot after visiting this museum, especially for a non-jewish person. Highly recommended.

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    The Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial

    by Goner Written Feb 25, 2003

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    A Hero

    Yad Vashem is the holocaust museum and research center. It displays the Holocaust martyr's and Heroes.

    My picture is of a statue a of a pediatrician who chose to die with Jewish orphans in the Holocaust. Dr. Janusz Korczak refused numerous opportunities to abandon the 200 children in his Warsaw orphanage. When the Nazis decided to deport those children to their deaths at Treblinka, Korczak chose to go with them, and also perished. Beside the sculpture stands a sign that reads: "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends (John 15:13).

    To me this was one of the most important reminders of the Holocaust; though there is much evil in this world there is always something or someone to remind us there is good.

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