Beersheba Things to Do

  • HaBama Center for the Arts - Arad
    HaBama Center for the Arts - Arad
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    Mig-23, IAF Museum, Beersheba
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Most Recent Things to Do in Beersheba

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    Israeli Air Force Museum

    by antistar Updated Feb 26, 2014

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    Mig-23, IAF Museum, Beersheba
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    To the north of the city, at Hatzerim Air Base, there is one of the most famous aircraft museums in the world: The Israeli Air Force museum. Here, preserved by the dry desert air, are aircraft from Israel's entire history. And that history is an eventful one. Not only has the IAF operated planes from nearly every major Western power, it has also fought against armies operating planes from everyone else.

    The museum is complete with airplanes from half a century, with German Messerschmitts, American Phantoms, British Meteors, French Mirages, as well as Israel's own planes, the suspiciously French looking IAI Kfirs. Then there are all the captured planes of their Arab foes, mostly Russian in origin, like the Syrian Mig-23 that was brought by a defecting pilot, but also others, like an Iraqi Vampire of British construction.

    To top it all there's also a collection of vehicles, mostly anti-aircraft artillery and missile carriers, but also some half-tracks, radar stations, and even civilian vehicles.

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    Israel Air Force Museum

    by Jackiekg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Israeli Air Force Museum

    Open every day except Saturday, 8.00 am to 5.00 pm (Fridays until 1.00 pm).

    A collection of over 140 aircraft. Most aircraft are in excellent condition.

    I didn't think I would enjoy this museum as much as I did (I'm nervous of flying to start with!) We were shown around the indoor part of the museum by a girl soldier and then she took us to see some of the planes that have taken a part in our history. Each plane has an explanation (in Hebrew and English) about its history. In one of the planes which flew to Antebbe, we were shown a film about plane missions. (See my travelogue).

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    Avraham's Well

    by Jackiekg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Avraham's Well

    Entrance is free unless you want the slide show.
    For opening hours, call 08-623 4613.

    The well is 12 feet across and 50 feet deep. Its top 28 feet are lined with stones, set, probably, at the time of the Byzantine settlement. After that it is hewn in bedrock. In 19th-century representations, one sees grooves in the stones, made by the ropes of the water haulers. (These top stones have had to be replaced.)

    See Travelogue.

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    Abraam's well

    by Ketikand Written Jul 16, 2008

    Not much to do in Beersheba, though you can go to the flea beduin market or visit Abraam's well. However with a little effort you can rent a car from avis and go around travelling! everything is very close in Israel, and some neighbouring cities are marvelous.

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    Lost in Space

    by gilabrand Updated Feb 15, 2007

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    Ilan Ramon Park

    Go into any kindergarten and ask the kids what they want to be when they grow up. At least one will say “I want to be an astronaut.” One boy who grew up in Beersheva actually became one.

    That boy was Ilan Ramon, who flew into space on the Columbia Space Shuttle on January 16, 2003 and spent a total of 15 days, 22 hours and 20 minutes there. On February 1 – exactly four years ago – Ramon and his 6 crewmates died as the shuttle burst into flame upon re-entering Earth’s atmosphere.

    Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon was a handsome and charming guy, praised by his crewmates not only for his professionalism but for being incredibly nice. He was born in Tel Aviv in June 1954, and moved to Beersheva as a child. Who knows if the desert terrain around Beersheva, often compared to a moonscape, didn’t influence his choice of career…

    Clearly though, it influenced the scientific experiment that he was conducting up there. It was called Mediex, which stands for Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiments. Ramon was also the first NASA astronaut to request kosher food and consult rabbis about Sabbath observance in space. He carried with him a drawing called “Moon Landscape,” by a 14-year old boy named Petr Ginz who was murdered in Auschwitz.

    Another item in his flight bag was a tiny Torah scroll given to a 13-year old boy in Bergen-Belsen by the rabbi of Amsterdam, so he could study for his bar-mitzvah. This boy, Yehoyahin Yosef, survived the Holocaust, immigrated to Israel and became a professor of planetary physics. He was the supervisor of the dust experiment.

    Ilan Ramon had four children. During a preflight interview he described watching their births as the most exciting moments of his life. Beersheva’s Astronaut Park, with its spaceship slides, is thus a fitting commemoration. “The world looks marvelous from up here, so peaceful, so wonderful and so fragile,” said Ramon as he looked down from space. Watching children play in the playground named for him, the view from down here doesn’t seem so bad either.

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    A Modest Monument

    by gilabrand Written Apr 2, 2006

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    Walking down the streets of Israeli cities, you will not encounter colossal bronzes of emperors on horseback or towering statues of the country’s founding fathers. In fact, you will not see much figurative art at all in public places.

    Municipal by-laws, particularly in Jerusalem, have always taken religious sensitivities into consideration. “You shall not make for yourself a graven image,” it says in the Bible. This verse has been interpreted by some rabbis as a ban on statuary. Fundamentalist Islam also forbids the depiction of human or animal form.

    The monument to General Edmund Allenby, an unadorned block of stone that sits in the middle of a small park in Beersheva’s old city, seems to conform with that idea.

    As the British conqueror who marched into Palestine and put an end to 4 centuries of Turkish rule with a surprise attack on Beersheva, one might have anticipated some majestic statue of the man on a galloping steed. His looks would seem to call for it, too. Allenby was a tall, imposing Englishman known to his soldiers as “the Bull.” The Arabs were terrified of him, and referred to him as “Allah Nabi” – the man sent by God.

    Actually, the park now called Gan Allenby was one of the first public parks in Palestine. The Turks planted it in 1906 and held public assemblies and ceremonies there. But park culture was not yet engrained. Bedouin brought their flocks to graze and the trees were cut down for firewood. In 1915, the park was restored as a formal Islamic garden: 4 paths leading to a central column celebrating the victories of the Ottoman Empire. After the British conquest, a bust of General Allenby was mounted on this column, but the Arabs tore it down.

    Since then, the monument has remained bereft of any image. The simple inscription reads: “Allenby, 1917-1918.”

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    Onward Jewish Soldier

    by gilabrand Updated Jan 30, 2006

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    Far from home

    In Flanders Fields the poppies grow; between the crosses row on row.

    Lines of poetry from my school days came back to me as I wandered among the graves in the Beersheva war cemetery, the resting place of 1,239 British and Australian soldiers who died in World War I (1914-1919).

    Even if you are not a great fan of cemeteries, the Commonwealth Military Cemetery on the edge of Beersheva's Old City is worth a visit.

    The rows of white grave markers lined up with soldierly precision, the lush green of the lawns, the carefully tended flower bushes, the silence. It is such a contrast to the world outside: the parched yellow that overtakes any untended patch of ground in this desert city, the hubbub of the streets where Jews, Arabs and Bedouin mingle, the high-rises and building cranes visible above the cemetery wall.

    Few people know that Beersheva was the site of one the most important battles in military history. On October 31, 1917, the Australian 4th Light Horse Brigade, 800 soldiers with only horses and bayonets, broke through Turkish defenses and captured the wells of Beersheva. There were 17 wells, which the Turks were poised to blow up. Toward evening, as the sun was setting, a daring cavalry charge was launched that took the Turks by surprise. They had not adjusted their gunsights and ended up firing over the horsemen's heads.

    At first glance all the gravestones look alike: rectangular slabs of marble inscribed with a cross. But one is different. On the last row on the right (coming in from the entrance gate), is a grave marked with a Magen David - a Jewish star.

    This is the grave of Captain Seymour Van den Berg of the Middlesex Hussars, a British Jew who was killed five days before the capture of Beersheva. You can see it from afar because there are always pebbles on it - an old Jewish custom signifying that someone has visited.

    Engraved on his tombstone are these words: Far from home, close in the hearts of those who loved him.

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    Ben Gurion University beer sheva

    by davidlayba Written Jan 16, 2006

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    Ben Gurion University

    Ben-Gurion University of the Negev was established with the aim to spearhead the development of the Negev, a desert area comprising more than sixty percent of the country. The University was inspired by the vision of Israel's first prime minister David Ben-Gurion, who believed that the future of the country lay in this region.

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    the ceramic studio of Yehudit Meir

    by davidlayba Written Jan 16, 2006

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    the ceramic  studio of Yehudit Meir
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    chiseled stone house, wall separate between the house and the street and it have internal garden.
    the house be kept well at his origin condision.
    since 1961 used as ceramic art workshop , in exhibit and sold her work of Yehudit Meir .

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    "wealthy turkish house" Hanegev pharmacy

    by davidlayba Written Jan 16, 2006

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    wealthy turkish house
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    at the past it was "wealthy turkish house" , today it's Hanegev pharmacy.
    two floor house, once of several unique at the turkish period. at the origin the ground floor used as fuel supply shop and the second flor used as the famely residence, until 1914, since then as hotel.
    from 1948 use as the first pharmacy in the Negev.

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    the messianic community house in beer sheva

    by davidlayba Updated Jan 16, 2006

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    the messianic house in beer sheva
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    at the corner of the streets "trumpeldor" and "haavot" we can see the messianic community house which established at the city founded at 1903, and designed at turkish style and used as I know to be residence of turkish officer maybe the police commander.
    at 1911 purchased by the american messianic organisation.

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    the school for the Bedouin children

    by davidlayba Updated Jan 16, 2006

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    school for the Bedouin children today
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    the structure of the bedouib children school build at 1906. the turkish build it at the effort to closeness to the bedouin population.
    but the building used as school short time inasmuch as at the war war 1 time wich bigan 8 year afterward the building turned to use as army hospital of the turkish army.

    today the building under construction.

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    the Turkish train station

    by davidlayba Updated Jan 16, 2006

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    the station manager house
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    at the war war 1 the turkish cooperation with the German in exertion to conquest egypt.
    at the frame of war exertion they built railroad track wich lead from Damascus to beer sheva.
    in 30/10/1915 be inaugurated beer sheva train station with attendance of turkey army commander "jamal fasha" , and seniors government people.
    the line was activ until the british conquest.

    at the israeli independence war the station be used as headquarters to egypt army.

    today it's close and not use, jast next to it you can see the the station manager house.

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    the private home of the district officer and arab

    by davidlayba Updated Jan 16, 2006

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    house of beer sheva turkish ruler
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    "Aaref el AarEf house" the private home of the district officer and arab historyon.
    [Aref el aref 1892-1973] built in 1938

    the facade of the house made from spasial stone [reddish] whiche to be brought from jerusalem area.
    duration years the building used as store.
    recently be bought by local contractor which rehabilitate it, in guidance of preservation committee site .

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    the Ethiopian jewish center craft

    by davidlayba Written Jan 13, 2006

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    at the Ethiopian jewish center craft be displayed spectacular exhibit of the ethiopian material colture of jews ethiopian.
    at the exhibit we can see the sculpting special craft of ethiopian woman, which be made at traditional technique.
    at the site be given lecture about the museum .
    open: monday , tusday , thersday at 08:30 - 12:30
    the entrance coordination in advance .

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