`En Gedi Things to Do

  • Ein Gedi
    Ein Gedi
    by Danalia
  • Ein Gedi
    Ein Gedi
    by Danalia
  • Ein Gedi
    Ein Gedi
    by Danalia

Most Recent Things to Do in `En Gedi

  • gubbi1's Profile Photo

    Animal Life

    by gubbi1 Written Apr 7, 2012
    Hyrax, Ein Gedi NP, IL
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    You will be surprised to see so many animals roaming the area and not being disturbed by the visitors. I saw many Hyrax and Ibex in the park. The Hyrax seemed to prefer the trees close to the entrance and the Ibex, as good climbers, were mainly along the canyon walls. Both are perfect to take photos, so don't forget your camera!

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    David's Fall

    by gubbi1 Written Apr 7, 2012
    David's Fall, Ein Gedi NP, IL
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    At the end of Wadi David you will come to a very beautiful waterfall. Kind of weird place when thinking about the dry desert you came through on your drive to Ein Gedi. The water dropping down the wall is the essential element for life in this region.

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    Hike Wadi David

    by gubbi1 Written Apr 7, 2012
    Hiking Wadi David, Ein Gedi, IL
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    A fairly easy hike also good to do with kids is a hike through the Wadi David. The hike follows along a creek towards the David's Fall. The view up to the walls of the Wadi and the nature in it is fascinating. I enjoyed it very much.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Fine place to take friends, part 2

    by Martin_S. Updated May 5, 2011
    Patrick and Lea at Nahal David, Israel
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    That first photo shows Patrick and Lea at the first observation point before we go onto the rocky path that will take us into the park...the distance is only a few hundred meters into the canyon to reach the first and major waterfall, while not overly difficult, it CAN BE quite difficult for a physically impaired person needing crutches and a wheelchair is impossible here sadly.
    The park itself consists of several paths you can follow, the lower park, where the major watefall is, is as I said not overly difficult. But if you decide to enter the upper park, you will need to follow the paths up steep cliff trails, not really dangerous, but be sure to take plenty of water, especially in the summer. If you DO make the climb it will be worth it.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Fine place to take friends (Patrick & Lea)

    by Martin_S. Updated May 5, 2011
    Main waterfall at Nahal David, Israel
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    The Nahal David (or also called the Ein Gedi) Nature Preserve is a fine place to take friends or even drop in for an afternoon walk...the only "small" problem is that today they charge a whopping 25NIS for entry (at this time in 2011 that is about 6-7USD or 5-6Euro).
    Well on this day took Patrick (patje) and his wife Lea, friends visiting from Belgium to see this desert oasis. I have been here hundreds of times and never tire of it. A few years ago a careless person discarded a cigarettee and almost the entire park burned down, all that green GONE. But today you begin to see once more the thickening of that green swath down the desert canyon, its great.
    The first photo shows the main and largest waterfall in the park and what most people "hurry" through the park to see. As you can see in the following photos there is a lot more to see.

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  • iblatt's Profile Photo

    "The Lowest Place on Earth"

    by iblatt Written Mar 11, 2011

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    Boardwalk to the lowest place on earth, Ein Gedi
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    The Dead Sea is renowned for being the lowest place on earth, at close to 400 meters below sea level. This is thanks to the Syrian-African rift, which shaped the geology of the region.
    When you drive from Jerusalem (600m above sea level) to the Dead Sea you pass the mark "sea level" on the way downhill.

    Near the Ein Gedi spa there is a boardwalk leading to the lowest point, with a few tables providing geological information. It is also accessible for the disabled.

    As you are not very likely to have your photo taken on the highest point on earth, Mt. Everest, you can at least take a photo in the lowest point, near Ein Gedi; it's much more accessible!!

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  • iblatt's Profile Photo

    Watch a Show in the "Arugot Auditorium"

    by iblatt Written Mar 11, 2011

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    Concert in Arugot Auditorium, Ein Gedi
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    The Arugot Auditorium is a small, intimate concert hall in kibbutz Ein Gedi.

    It has a superb location, on the edge of the cliff overlooking the Arugot valley, the Mitzpeh Ein Gedi mountain and the Dead Sea. Actually, the "Arugot Lookout" observation deck is located on the roof of the auditorium.

    I watched a great concert of arias from Mozart's operas in the Arugot Auditorium. The special blend of good music, informal atmosphere, beautiful location and inspiring views made this a memorable event.

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  • iblatt's Profile Photo

    Herb and Spice Garden: "Gan Arugot Ha-Bossem"

    by iblatt Updated Mar 10, 2011

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    Ein Gedi
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    A special part of the botanical garden is dedicated to perfumes, medicinal herbs and spices. This evokes the ancient tradition of perfume making in Ein Gedi 2000 years ago. Some Biblical herbs and spices form part of the garden.

    It is a pleasant and easy stroll from the hotel dining hall along the western edge of the cliff upon which the kibbutz was built. Pick a leaf or a petal here and there, feel it between your fingers and enjoy the fragrance.

    On the way there is also a beautiful observation point, overlooking the Arugot Valley, the ancient agricultural terraces, the Judean Desert and the Dead Sea.

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  • iblatt's Profile Photo

    Fauna: Meet the Rock Hyrax!

    by iblatt Updated Mar 9, 2011

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    Rock hyrax on the move
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    In the Ein Gedi Nature Reserve you are bound to see this cute furry rodent. It's not a hare, it's a rock hyrax! It has brown-grey fur, short ears and legs and a very small tail. It is not a great runner, but a champion climber.

    The hyrax climbs rocks, trees and bushes, eats almost every part of the shrubs, up to a quarter of its weight each day. It gets its water from the vegetation it consumes, and does not need to drink: a big evolutionary advantage in the desert!

    The hyrax is a social animal and lives in families. The female's pregnancy lasts a surprisingly long time for a small animal: seven and a half months!

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  • iblatt's Profile Photo

    Fauna: Get to Know the Ibex

    by iblatt Updated Mar 8, 2011

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    Ibex on their way to drink; Ein Gedi
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    Everybody likes the ibex. They have long horns curving backward elegantly, they move about in herds, and climb the rocky desert cliffs with no difficulty, as agile and graceful as can be.

    The ibex were hunted down in the past and their population dwindled, but in the past 55 years they are a protected species, and their numbers have increased impressively. The ibex is the symbol of the Nature and Park Authority in Israel.

    You can most easily see them in the Ein Gedi Nature Reserve, but they often also come to the kibbutz, where they know they will find food. In the early morning hours you can see them coming down to drink from the natural pools of the Nachal David stream.

    During the courtship season (September to November) you may be lucky and watch the males' courtship dance (rather clumsy for such a graceful animal!).

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  • iblatt's Profile Photo

    Arugot Lookout

    by iblatt Written Mar 6, 2011

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    View from Mitzpeh Arugot to the Dead Sea
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    In kibbutz Ein Gedi, at the northern end of the botanical garden, there is a good observation point (follow the signs to "Arugot Lookout" or "Mitzpeh Arugot" in Hebrew).

    From the roof of the Arugot Hall you have an excellent view all around:
    The Nature Reserve with the Arugot Canyon opening to the Dead Sea, the edge of the Judean Desert with the Mitzpeh Ein Gedi cliffs, a palm plantation, the ancient settlement of Tel Goren and the ancient synagogue (in the distance), and the kibbutz itself with its botanical garden.

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  • iblatt's Profile Photo

    Ein Gedi Botanical Garden

    by iblatt Updated Mar 6, 2011

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    Ein Gedi Botanical Garden
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    When Kibbutz Ein Gedi was first erected in its present location, in the early 1960s, it stood on a bare desert hill overlooking the Dead Sea, with no shade or vegetation. The kibbutz members cleverly used the Ein Gedi spring water to create a beautiful green village with lots of bushes and trees giving shade in the scorching sun.

    The special climate of the Ein Gedi oasis helped create a home for various kinds of trees and shrubs, imported from remote corners of the world. You can see baobab trees from Africa, others from Madagascar and South America. There are also cacti and succulents, as befitting a desert botanical garden.

    The best thing about the Ein Gedi botanical garden is that it's everywhere: The kibbutz residential houses, public areas and the resort hotel are all surrounded by unusual and beautiful vegetation.

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  • iblatt's Profile Photo

    Nature Reserve: Upper David's Canyon

    by iblatt Updated Mar 5, 2011

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    In Upper Nachal David, Ein Gedi
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    If you want to extend your nature hike in Ein Gedi beyond the basic "Waterfall Trail" of Lower Nachal David, take the 3-4 hour long Upper Nachal David trail. It starts from the trail fork near David's Waterfall.

    This trail is graded medium difficulty, and a sign at the fork warns it is for "fit hikers" only. The trail climbs up to the mid-cliff-level, through Shulamit's Spring, the Dodim Cave, then further south via the Ein Gedi Spring towards Tel Goren.

    The views from the upper trail are stunning, towards the lower Nachal David trail, the field school and the Dead Sea, offering a different perspective of Ein Gedi's attractions.

    The part of the trail descending towards Dodim Cave, located above David Waterfall on a higher level, is especially beautiful, descending through lush vegetation and natural pools and minute waterfalls.

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  • iblatt's Profile Photo

    Ein Gedi Nature Reserve: Introduction

    by iblatt Written Mar 5, 2011

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    Map of Ein Gedi Nature Reserve
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    Ein Gedi is one of the best and most interesting nature reserves in Israel. its geographical location is unique: at the eastern edge of the Judean Desert, on the shores of the Dead Sea, in the lowest place on earth (400m below sea level). It covers an area of 14,350 dunams, and includes two canyons which course down the Judean Desert cliffs towards the Dead Sea: Nachal David (David's stream) and Nachal Arugot ("flowerbed stream"). In both of these streams water flows all year round, thanks to four springs located within the reserve: David spring (in Nachal David), Ein Arugot spring (in Nachal Arugot), and two springs located between these two streams: Shulamit spring and Ein Gedi spring.

    The reserve has several hiking trails, with different difficulty grades. The easiest trail (also suitable for familes with children) is the Lower Nachal David trail (see separate tip). The nedium-difficulty (and medium length) trails are the Upper Nachal David trail (3-4 hours, starting point near the David Waterfall in Lower Nachal David; see separate tip) and the Nachal Arugot trails (2-3 or 3-4 hours, starting from the Nachal Arugot entrance of the reserve.

    The most strenuous ones (and longest ones: 6-9 hours) start near the Dead Sea shores, climb the cliffs and mountains of the Judean Desert, affording incredible views over Ein Gedi and the Dead Sea, then climbing down again. The Har-Yishay trail starts from the Ein Gedi field school; the Ma'aleh Bnei Hamoshavin trail starts from Tel Goren; the Har Tzruya trail starts from the gate of Kibbutz Ein Gedi.

    If you are looking for wildlife, you are most likely to see ibexes and hyrexes (see separate tips). There are some night predators in the reserve, but you are very unliklely to meet them during day hours. You are likely to see birds, such as Tristram's starlings and ravens, but occasionally also some birds of prey.
    There are several kinds of reptiles, including venomous snakes, so watch your step!

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  • iblatt's Profile Photo

    Nature Reserve: David Waterfall

    by iblatt Written Mar 5, 2011

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    David Waterfall, Ein Gedi nature reserve
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    At the end of the Lower Nachal David trail (see separate tip) you will reach the David Waterfall. This is the highest waterfall in the reserve.

    It's a beautiful spectacle, watching the water descend from a height of 30 meters into a shallow pool surrounded by cliffs, covered by the typical endemic vegetation of the Ein Gedi oasis, especially the fern nicknamed in Hebrew "Shulamit's hair" (Adiantum capillus-veneris).

    Sitting at the edge of the pool, feeling the light spray of the falling water: this is the ultimate relaxation on a hot day in the desert!

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`En Gedi Things to Do

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