Old Jaffa, Tel Aviv-Yafo

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  • Carmela71's Profile Photo

    The clock tower

    by Carmela71 Updated Mar 27, 2004

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    At this square is the Jaffa Clock Tower or also called Al-Saa'a, as you can see is nearly impossible to do a proper photo without avoiding the cables or cars (something Stace always complain talking about Spain, as he says you always get a crane, cables or bikes in his photos hahahaha), so again we felt home LOL

    Now serious, This square was bordering the mosque and the prison, you can the see the first one at your left and the second at your right, if we could have done a panoramic photo

    From here, we headed back to Tel Aviv

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  • tzuki's Profile Photo

    Jaffa, the Beauty

    by tzuki Written Jun 2, 2007

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    Path to Old Jaffa District. Photo by GUrech
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    Site away of the busy Tel-Aviv... you can find the calm in the Milenary Jaffa ("the beauty").
    The port is where, according to the legend, Jonas left to be "face-to-face" with the whale... However nowadays, the district of Jaffa has emerged thanks to an artistic influence where crasftsmen and bohemian live together along with nice restaurants and art galleries.
    If you have any oportunity to land in Tel-Aviv, you should not miss a walk along narrow streets of this beautiful district, you deserve!
    For me, was very special, very enchanting.

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    Yafo-Kikar Kedumim

    by navaros Updated Jul 11, 2003

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    Kikar Kedumim visitor center.

    Kikar Kedumim is situated on the hill of old Yafo. You can reach the place with a nerrow steps from the port, or by foot from the Old Clock Tower.
    The archeology diggings have exposed very old house. The visitor's center is open to see it, and the film on the history of Jaffa .
    At the top of the hill is the Franciscan Church of St. Peter, which was established in the 17th Century.
    One of the most important sites for Christianity in Jaffa is the house of Simon the Tanner. On the roof of this house was the miracle of the unclean foods that became clean in the eyes of the Christians and, from here, he went out first to bring the message to all the peoples and not just to the Jews. Not far from here is the grave of St. Tabitha, who died at a young age and, because of good deeds, was returned to life by St. Peter, who said to her’ “Tabitha Rise”.
    visitor center: 03-5182680
    Open daily. Sun-Thur: 9:00-22:00
    Fri:9:00-14:00 Sat: 10:00-22:00
    Free Entry

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    The Old Port of Jaffa

    by Sharon Updated Feb 27, 2005

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    Fishermans return from the sea..

    The area of the port is very old one and very nice to visit. You'll find old houses by new ones or renovated ones. Some restaurants, Mosques and Churches as well.
    In the middle of the week this place is really relaxed and nice, during weekends you might find it a bit crowded.

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    Hasan Bek Mosque

    by Carmela71 Updated Mar 27, 2004

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    This mosque is getting surrender by hotels and big buildings, but still preserves its impressive look, maybe because I love minarets.

    It is close to the promenade close to Jaffa, we passed by on our walk back to the hotel after visiting Jaffa.

    I love the little windows, never seen before similar in another mosque or maybe I had not seen enough mosques.

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  • Carmela71's Profile Photo

    Jaffa

    by Carmela71 Updated Mar 27, 2004

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    view from promenade

    It is one of the most ancient ports that is still working!!!

    It is a very interesting and beauty area to visit. Interesting due as it has been restored and it became a cultural centre as many artists live there.

    I would suggest to wander around, and maybe seat in one of the restaurants around to enjoy the views.

    See travelogue for more photos

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    Jaffa Archaeological Site

    by Carmela71 Updated Mar 27, 2004

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    it is underneath the main square of Jaffa, with remains of the Hellenic, Roman and Bizantine Empires. At least is good to see who it is being preserve, as you can mix at the same place, our interest for other cultures, enjoy the typical heritage and enjoy also great restaurants around....

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    Rameses II Archaeological Garden

    by Carmela71 Updated Mar 27, 2004

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    Ok, I have to say we went to this trip a little undocumented, so what we founded at Jaffa was a pleasure for our eyes. We love all historical remains, so finding here all this Egyptian and other cultures remains in such a good state was fantastic.

    Seriously you have to go, all I can tell you is not enough! You have to see it with your own eyes!

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Jaffa - Alleyways and Galleries

    by leffe3 Written May 9, 2006

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    Steep and stepped alleys lead from the main square to the port below. A bevy of galleries, museums, places of worship (Muslim, Christian, Jewish), antique shops and (not very good) cafes abound in the restored, bouganvillea shrouded streets with occasional glimpses of the sea. Overlook the port below. It may be over-restored (although amazingly it was done in the 1960s - it has a much more recent feel to it) but this is one of the most atmospheric of all places in Tel Aviv/Yafo.

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    old city and it's religious icons

    by leffe3 Written May 10, 2006

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    Old Jaffa is a biblical city with a varied past, including the invasion and carnage bestowed upon the Arab population by Napoleon. Until the beginning of the 20th century, a wary peace between Arabs and Jews has existed, but tensions rose and the Jews moved a couple of kms north to what is now present day Neve Tzedek, the southern suburb of modern day Tel Aviv. Christian and Moslem arabs lived (and continue to do so) side by side, highlighted by the density of religious buildings in the relatively small area of Old Jaffa. Many (but not all) are open to the public but all provide a fascinating history to the port and a sperb backdrop/foreground to modern Tel Aviv and the Mediterranean Sea.

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    Oranger Suspendu

    by mindcrime Written Jan 29, 2014

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    Walking around the Old Town of Jaffa a journey through time, the old stone houses and the maze of the narrow passages with several arches worth it for sure even if you have to walk up the steep hill. The alleys near the port are more busy of course but as you go higher you’ll probably be alone with isolated picturesque corners, what a contrast with the busy/noisy streets of Tel Aviv earlier that day in the morning.

    But one of the best/weird moments when we reached the edge of an alley that lead us to the strange structure you see here (pics 1-2). Built in 1993 by Ran Morin this is a weird artificial sculpture with stone and steel repressing a hanging orange tree! The sign on the wall gives some historical info about the Jaffa oranges (pic 3)

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  • Nathalie_B's Profile Photo

    Clock Tower

    by Nathalie_B Updated Apr 21, 2007

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    Not only tourists, but even Israelis often pass by this tower without paying it too much attention. And even if they do, not many know its fascinating history. However, Israelis are the last ones to take credit for creating this structure.
    The building of the clock tower started in 1900, when the land was under Turkish rule. It was created to commemorate 25 years of Sultan's Abdul Hamid II rule. For some reason, it took 6 years to complete the structure.
    Back in 17th century the place was the biggest Muslim cemetary and only at the end of 19th century it was turned into a market. Because it was the biggest market of Jaffa the place was named Market Square.
    During the WWI it was taken over under the British Mandate after a battle that was won by Australia-New Zealand Corps, on Ncvember 16, 1917.
    Since then many things have changed in old Jaffa. The market it no longer there (the flea market is just around the corner), many Arabs left the area back in 1948, and so the British, giving this land to Israelis. But the Clock Tower is still there.
    The tower and the square were completely renovated in 2004, so we can continue to appreciate its multi-national history.

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    Gan ha-Midron and Summit parks on the hill

    by mindcrime Written Jan 29, 2014

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    cannon from Napoleon era
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    If the temperature isn’t really high you may want to climb up to Gan ha-Midron and Summit parks, both of them located at the top of the Old Town of Jaffa. There are many nice spots where you can have nice view over the sea and Tel Aviv’s skyline near its long beach with the high rise buildings etc

    There are several benches where you can rest for a while but also some interesting sculptures, monuments, cannons from Napoleon era etc The most interesting is the the white sculpture The Gate of Faith (pic 2) that shows biblical scenes from the Old Testament, a nice spot to take picture if you can wait for the rest of the tourists that usually want to do the same :)

    Part of summit park is shaped like an amphitheater, it’s a place that houses many oper air concerts during the summer months, a great free to do activity if you happen to be there in summer.

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  • 1W1V's Profile Photo

    Old Jaffa - A must see !

    by 1W1V Written Mar 3, 2008

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    Jaffa Port from TA Beach/Promenade
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    Jaffa (or Yafo) is one of the most ancient port cities in the world. Some claim that Jaffa was named after Japheth, one of the three sons of Noah, who built it forty years after the Great Flood. A Hebrew etymology indicates that the city is called Jaffa because of its beauty (yofi in Hebrew). The Hellenist tradition links the name to "Iopeia", which is Cassiopeia, the mother of Andromeda. Following Pliny the Elder the name is connected with Jopa, who was the daughter of Aeolus, the god of wind. However, the Hellenist and Roman accountings for the name date from hundreds of years after the original (most probably west-semitic) naming.[citation needed]

    [edit] Ancient period
    The ancient site of Jaffa is Tel Yafo, or "Jaffa Hill," which rises to a height of 40 meters (130 feet) and offers a commanding view of the coastline. Hence its strategic importance in military history. At the foot of the hill were springs of fresh water. The accumulation of debris and landfill over the centuries made the hill even higher.

    Jaffa's natural harbor has been in use since the Bronze Age. It is mentioned in an Ancient Egyptian letter from 1470 BCE, glorifying its conquest by Pharaoh Thutmose III, who hid armed warriors in large baskets and gave the baskets as a present to the Canaanite city's governor. The city is also mentioned in the Amarna letters under its Egyptian name Ya-Pho, ( Ya-Pu, EA 296, l.33). In 1991, a replica of the Egyptian gate lintels, bearing the titles of Pharaoh Ramesses II, was re-erected on its original site. The city was under Egyptian rule until around 800 BCE.

    Jaffa is mentioned in the Book of Joshua as the territorial border of the Tribe of Dan, hence the term "Gush Dan", used today for the coastal plain. Many descendants of Dan lived along the coast and earned their living from shipmaking and sailing. In the "Song of Deborah" the prophetess asks: "ãï ìîä éâåø àåðéåú": "Why doth Dan dwell in ships?"[citation needed][2]


    Interior of St. Peter's Church and the Vision of St. PeterKing David and his son King Solomon conquered Jaffa and used its port to bring the cedars used in the construction of the First Temple from Tyre. The city remained in Jewish hands even after the split of the Kingdom of Israel. In 701 BCE, in the days of King Hezekiah (çæ÷éäå), Sennacherib, king of Assyria, invaded the region from Jaffa.

    Jaffa was a Seleucid port until it was taken over by the Maccabean rebels (1 Maccabees x.76, xiv.5). In the Roman suppression of the Jewish Revolt, Jaffa was captured and burned by Cestius Gallus. The Roman Jewish historian Josephus writes that eight thousand inhabitants were massacred. Pirates operating from the rebuilt port incurred the wrath of Vespasian, who razed the city and erected a citadel in its place, installing a Roman garrison there.

    The New Testament account of St. Peter's resurrection of the widow Tabitha, (Dorcas) (Acts, ix, 36-42) takes place in Jaffa. St. Peter later had a vision in which God told him not to distinguish between Jews and Gentiles or between kosher and non-kosher (Acts, x, 10-16). This vision heralded a major ideological split between Judaism and Christianity. A painting in St. Peter's, a Roman Catholic church in Jaffa, depicts this event.

    [edit] Medieval period

    Saladin's attack on JaffaUnimportant during the first centuries of Christianity, Jaffa did not have a bishop until the fifth century CE. In 636 Jaffa was conquered by Arabs. Under Islamic rule, it served as a port of Ramla, then the provincial capital.

    Jaffa was captured during the Crusades, and became the County of Jaffa and Ascalon, one of the vassals of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. One of its counts, John of Ibelin, wrote the principal book of the Assizes of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. During the period of the Crusades, the Jewish traveller Benjamin of Tudela (1170) sojourned at Jaffa, and found there just one Jew, a dyer by trade. Saladin took it in 1187. The city surrendered to King Richard the Lionheart on September 10, 1191, three days after the Battle of Arsuf. Despite efforts by Saladin to reoccupy the city in July 1192 (see Battle of Jaffa) the city remained in the hands of the Crusaders, and on 2nd September 1192 the Treaty of Jaffa was formally sworn, guaranteeing a three year truce between the two armies. In 1268 Jaffa was conquered by Egyptian mamluks, led by Baibars. In 14th century they completely destroyed the city for fear of new crusades. According to the traveler Cotwyk, Jaffa was a heap of ruins at the end of the 16th century.

    [edit] The Ottoman period
    On March 7, 1799 Napoleon I of France captured Jaffa and his troops proceeded to kill more than two thousand Albanian captives.

    Jaffa was well known for its cash crops such as citrus and bananas. Until the establishment of Tel Aviv and the era of the Mandate for Palestine, Jaffa had the most advanced commercial, banking, fishing, and agriculture industries in Palestine. It had many factories specializing in cigarette making, cement making, tile and roof tile production, iron casting, cotton processing plants, traditional handmade carpets, leather products, wood boxes for Jaffa oranges, textiles, presses and publications. The majority of all publications and newspapers in Palestine were published in Jaffa.

    By the beginning of the twentieth century, the population of Jaffa had swelled considerably and new suburbs were built on the sand dunes along the coast. By 1909, the new Jewish suburbs north of Jaffa were reorganized as the city of Tel Aviv.

    Image:Kook color.jpg
    Rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook was chief rabbi of Jaffa from 1904-1921.In 1904 Rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook (1864-1935) moved to Palestine and took up the position of chief rabbi of Jaffa:

    In 1904, he came to the Land of Israel to assume the rabbinical post in Jaffa, which also included responsibility for the new secular Zionist agricultural settlements nearby. His influence on people in different walks of life was already noticeable, as he attempted to introduce Torah and Halakha into the life of the city and the settlements.[3]
    In 1917, the Ottomans banished all of Jaffa's residents as they feared the British army would occupy the city. The British did indeed occupy the city (see Sinai and Palestine Campaign), but let its residents return after a year.

    [edit] Under the British mandate

    British Commonwealth soldiers stand outside the Jaffa municipal building.During 1917-1920, there were thousands of Jewish residents in Jaffa. A wave of Arab pogrom attacks during 1920 and 1921 caused many Jewish residents to flee and resettle in Tel Aviv. The 1921 riots (known as the Meoraot Tarpa by the Jews) began with a May Day parade that turned violent. The Arab rioters attacked Jewish people and buildings, including the residents of "The House of Immigrants" and the Jewish author Yosef Haim Brenner.

    In 1921 Rabbi Kook moved to Jerusalem when he was appointed as the first Ashkenazi chief rabbi of the British Mandate of Palestine and is still regarded as Israel's first chief rabbi as well.

    At the end of 1922 Jaffa had 32,000 residents while Tel Aviv had 15,000. However, in 1927, Tel Aviv had 38,000 residents. The Jews of Jaffa lived on the outskirts of Jaffa, close to Tel Aviv. The old city of Jaffa, which was controlled by the Arabs, was almost empty of Jews. During the 1930s both cities had a combined population of 80,000 residents. By 1945, Arabs owned 146,316 dunams (146 km²) of citrus, and Jews owned 66,403 dunams (66 km²).[citation needed]

    The 1936-1939 Arab revolt in Palestine, also known as the Great Arab uprising, inflicted great economic and infrastructural damage on Jaffa. Urban warfare between the British forces and Arab resistance destroyed many of the city's narrow alleys. The British demolished many houses belonging to Arab resistance. Jewish and British citizens moved their businesses out of Jaffa. As a reaction to the strike of the Arab seaport workers, the Jews built a modern seaport in Tel Aviv, which resulted in decreased income for Jaffa's Arab seaport.

    In 1945 Jaffa had a population of 101,580; of whome 53,930 were Muslims, 30,820 were Jews and 16,800 were Christians.[4] The Christians were mostly Greek-Orthodox with about one sixth of them being Greek-Catholic. One of the most prominent members of the Arab Christian community was the Arab Orthodox publisher of Filastin, Daoud Isa.

    [edit] The 1948 Arab-Israeli War
    Prior to the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the UN's Special Commission on Palestine in 1947 recommended that Jaffa become part of the planned Jewish state. Due to the large Arab majority, however, it was instead designated as an Arab enclave in the Jewish state in the 1947 UN Partition Plan.

    (c) Wikipedia

    Today, the renovated streets of Jaffa offer a nice walk with some interesting surprise as these streets are the house of local artists.

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    Jaffa Underground Museum

    by Martin_S. Written Dec 23, 2006

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    View from Jaffa to Tel-Aviv, Israel
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    The first picture shows how close the modern city of Tel-Aviv (established in 1911) is, you can walk along the coastline for a few minutes and arrive in the Charles Clore Park along the shore.
    The second picture shows a "garbage collector", one of the poor of Israel who do not have means to support themselves for whatever reason. This person was collecting bottles and cans to return for the deposit.
    The third picture shows the "stories in stone" that are carved stone markers along the walls of ancient Yafo and each tells a historical story of the area.

    The last picture shows what is UNDER you while walking the center of Jaffo (Yafo in Hebrew). You will pass OVER a museum...if you look carefully you will see a slanted walkway leading down, take that for a short stroll into the far past of this ancient city of Yafo.

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