Fun things to do in Israel

  • "Wine Road" pedestrian street, Zichron...
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  • Painted doorways, Haifa
    Painted doorways, Haifa
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    City of Eilat, View from the hotel,...
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Israel

  • Ramon Crater. A journey into the belly of Earth

    by EyalK2 Written Nov 11, 2014

    The Ramon crater, one of the most unique natural phenomena in the world, located just in front of the town of Mitzpe Ramon, there are plenty of tracks and routes by feet, mountain bikes and guided jeep tours. The desert landscape is very varied and colorful, full of geological phenomena, extreme desert flora and fauna. For those seeking to know the desert This is one of the most recommended places.

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    Haifa

    by mindcrime Written Aug 23, 2014

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    We arrived in Israel by plane at Ben Gurion airport and took the direct train to Haifa so this was the first city we visited. This is also the first stop for many people that arrive in Israel with a cruise as Haifa is the main port.

    Haifa is the third largest city in Israel with about 300,000 inhabitants. It’s on the Mediterranean shoreline of Israel at the foothill of Mount Carmel. It’s well connected with other towns located 90km North of Tel Aviv, 156 NW of Jerusalem, 25km SW of Acre, 65km West of Tiberias.

    Most people don’t see Haifa a tourist destination and the truth is that we didn’t have much expectations but we finally liked and didn’t get bored at all at this sun splashed metropolis that combines vibrant student population with nicely mixed arab and jewish neighbourhoods.

    At the Tourist information (located at Ben Gurion avenue, not far from the lower level of Bahai Gardens) there was a friendly lady that provide us with a free city map and gave us some information, mainly pointed on the map where we get local buses etc. We also used the Carmelit funicular, although it covers only a small part of Haifa it was very useful for us to cover the steepness of the mountain from downtown to Hadar district where we met with some friends. Most of the times it was empty with only a few other riders but we would visit it anyway just to see the world's second shortest (1750metels long) subway after the tunel in Istanbul (570meters long). It operated for the first time in 1959 and it’s the only subway in Israel but the funny thing is its weird structure with numerous steps on the stations’ platforms but also inside the train cabins!

    We started from the upper level of Baha’I Gardens, we strolled along Louis Promenade and had some great photo shots (the view is breathtaking) then at noon did the tour of the Gardens. We catched bus 115 to Stella Maris church/monastery and returned back to the center where we walked along German Colony and the colorful arab neighborhood of Wadi Nisnas. We didn’t have time for the beach (you can check Dado beach for swimming) or any museum (from science to Japanese Art and from city history to maritime history there’s something for everyone) because the next day we preferred to do a side trip to Akko, there’s train and bus connection but we just used a shared taxi. Other alternatives for half day trips from Haifa may be a hike in the Carmel National Forest or a visit to the Druze ethnic villages in the Carmel mountain.

    Bahai Gardens view over Bahai Gardens Stella Maris church Bahai Gardens at night Carmelit funicular
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    Herzliya

    by mindcrime Written Aug 23, 2014

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    Herzliya is a city just 12km north of Tel Aviv. It was a small town at first, with many immigrants arriving after 1948. During the 1960s it had 25,000 residents while today it has about 90,000 and covers an area of 22 sq kilometers. The railway line splits Herzliya in two parts, the beach is 2,5km to the west, the upscale Herzliya Pituach 3km NW and the town of Herzliya is 2,5km east of the train station!

    Most visitors prefer to visit the fine beach and Herzliya Pituah suburb where many rich people have their expensive homes. The area is also famous for its marina (it was built in the 1970s) and its numerous café and restaurants. For some cultural touch you can visit Sinda Ali Mosque at the northern end of the beach.

    We arrived by bus from Raanana, the bus went through the city until it reached the beach but it started to rain so we returned back to main city, a typical residential area without tourists of course but full of local people doing their daily routine, going to work, shopping or relaxing at one of the numerous cafés. There are some cinemas and Malls but also a modern art museum (Herzliya Art Museum) near the central bus station.

    Herzliya was founded in 1924 as a moshava, a typical form of rural settlement in Israel which is actually a semi-cooperative farming community (the difference with kibbutz communities is that in moshava the land and property are privately owned). It was named after Theodor Herzl (1860-1904), a writer/journalist from Austria-Hungary that is the father of modern political Zionism that promoted Jewish migration to Palestine. He believed that the Jews possessed a nationality but the only way to avoid anti-semitism was for them to have their own state to practice their culture/religion freely. He died of cardiac sclerosis in Austria and he reburied on the top of Mount Herzl in Jerusalem.
    Today Herzliya is one of the wealthiest cities in Israel. There’s a small airport but I guess it’s used only for some local flights.

    herzliya beach herzliya beach herzliya center
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    Akko

    by mindcrime Written Aug 23, 2014

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    Acre is a small city 26km north of Haifa located at the north edge of Haifa Bay. We went there using a shared taxi from Haifa (13nis per person) and focused on the Old Town of Akko where most attractions are located. You can also use trains from Tel Aviv/Haifa or buses and then walk for about 10’ to the Old Town.

    First we visited the Tourist Info, there was no free map but they have one for 3nis which was handy and helpful although what we really liked in the Old Town was just getting lost in the maze of the alleys (the old part isn’t that big so worth to try it)

    We bought the combined ticket (46nis) that includes entrance to many attractions (Citadel/Okashi Museum/Templar Tunnel/Turkish bath) but we also walked through the Turkish market and then all over the Old City, we loved the numerous stores at the central market where we bought lots of herbs/spices but also dry fruits, nuts, olives and fresh fruit juice, they were enough for a proper lunch that day!

    We ended up down to the harbor, saw the old Lighthouse and took lots of photos of/from the old walls before we return back to the Old Town and find a place to eat something (there are many eateries near the entrance)

    Akko El Jazaar mosque turkish bath
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    Tel Aviv

    by mindcrime Written Aug 23, 2014

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    Tel Aviv isn’t a beautiful city but it has some great corners, the beach itself and the long promenade and the old town of Jaffa district are enough to give it a try. We could easily add an extra day for the museums of Tel Aviv and probably one more during the summer if we wanted to enjoy the beach/sea (we skipped this in late October and preferred Dead Sea)

    The main reason we didn’t get excited with Tel Aviv is that it’s a big (with almost half million inhabitants) coastal modern city and a business center with numerous banks and offices but also has a large clubbing scene and thus popular among young people, so no surprise many refer to Tel Aviv as the party city.

    We were staying at Raanana (a north suburb of Tel Aviv) but we actually visited Tel Aviv only once and found most parts boring comparing to the feeling we had in other Israeli cities and towns. The only exception was Jaffa, the ancient port city from where the jewish immigration started in early 20th century to the north of Jaffa (now part of Tel Aviv Jaffo) an area that arabs were the majority back then.

    In the morning we visited the modern part of the city, got off the bus near the ugly City Hall, walked along Rabin square and liked the numerous tree-lined boulevards (Chen, Rothschild etc). Then we went down the commercial Sheinkin street (it also houses some nice café there so we stopped for light lunch) and ended up at the famous Carmel market. Then we visited some synagogues, the colorful Neve Tzedek district with its art galleries and then we headed down to the beach where we walked along the promenade.

    In the evening we visited Jaffa the oldest district, the Old Town and its maze of alleys is great, we checked the view from the hill, visited some churches but also the marina and the clock tower.

    Tel Aviv is 68km W of Jerusalem. Most people travelling in Israel arrive at Ben Gurion airport which is 15km away from Tel Aviv. You can take a taxi (120nis) or the train at the lower level (12nis for Tel Aviv) there are trains 24h but not during Sabbath (Friday afternoon till Saturday evening).

    Yaffo view from hill over Yaffo Tel Aviv beach modern buildings in Tel Aviv Great Synagogue
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    Raanana

    by mindcrime Written Aug 23, 2014

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    Ra’anana is a midsize town 18km north of Tel Aviv, in between Herzliya (on the west) and Kfar Saba (on the east). We were guests of some friends that live there so we used Raanana as a base for our excursions in nearby towns, there’s no train station but we used buses to reach Tel Aviv, Herzliya, Jerusalem.

    Staying in Ra’anana (means fresh) was a pleasant surprise for us although we knew tourists don’t really have something to see here (considering how interesting other Israeli cities are) but in case you drop by you may want to check The Founders Museums that focus on the early history of the town or walk into the park of Raanana which is the largest urban park in Sharon region. It has about 70,000 residents, not only native-born Israelis but also many immigrants from America, Europe, S.Africa, Russia. It’s very tidy and clean with numerous trees on the main streets and lot of green in general, no surprise many people choose to live here for high life quality.

    Ahuza street splits the town in two as it runs from east to west, bus #29 was very handy for us to move around on either side. We loved the peaceful districts, we had some lazy walks around, apart from the apartment blocks there are some interesting (expensive) houses most of them with their own garden etc I may be wrong but this was the only Israeli town we didn’t see any orthodox jew but of course there are many synagogues.

    Raanana garden in Raanana Raanana
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    Bet She’arim

    by mindcrime Written Aug 23, 2014

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    Beit-She’arim (House of Gates) was founded by immigrants from Yugoslavia in 1926 as a moshava, a typical form of rural settlement in Israel which is actually a semi-cooperative farming community (the difference with kibbutz communities is that in moshava the land and property are privately owned). The town is located in the lower Galilee, 25km SW of Haifa near Kiryat Tiyvon (which is next to the park) and has about 500 inhabitants. Beit She’arim was founded at the end of 1st century BC during the reign of King Herod (yes the madman but also famous for his colossal building projects) and destroyed by fire in 352AD.

    So, the moshava was named after that ancient city of Beit She’arim that was located where now is the Beit-She’arim National Park.

    Most visitors don’t visit the moshava but the National Park which is an archeological site of an old Jewish necropolis from the roman period with many ancient rock-cut jewish tombs. There’s a footpath that connects many different caves with some of them open to the public.

    As we were on our way to Zippori National Park (there are many all over Israel, usually with a small entrance fee but worth to buy a card for many of them) we preferred to skip this and just saw some ruins of an ancient Synagogue and then we walked uphill to Alexander Zaid monument, a great spot for view over Jerzeel valley.

    Alexander Zaid over Jerzeel valley Alexander Zaid statue view Kiryat Tiv'on ruins in Bet She���arim
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    Zippori National Park

    by mindcrime Written Aug 23, 2014

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    In Lower Galilee, on our way to Nazareth we stopped at Tzippori National Park, an archeological site that houses the ruins on the Roman city of Tzippori (probably named after the Hebrew word tsippor that means bird).

    I love ancient history, ruins and culture and this places like this combine everything so we spent some great time here. The entrance fee is 30NIS but we bought a green card (110NIS) that was valid for 6 national parks/archeological sites.

    The excavations of the ancient town started in 1931 revealing many jewish homes, the main cobblestone street but also a synagogue from 5th century AD. From the roman era you can see the Theater but also a mansion with a beautiful mosaic from 2nd century AD. Another building has also nice mosaics devoted to Nile. The only structure from the crusader/ottoman era is the 12th century fortress on top of the main hill.

    Don’t forget to bring along some water with you because the sun is the real enemy here, hard to find some corners with shade, only in some of the buildings. Apart from the main (east to west) street the roman town had many others creating a network that connects the different buildings all over the town. The stone paved streets were colonnaded and although you can’t see that in the ruins there are some transparent panels with sketches to give you an idea how a street was back then. Most buildings had roofed porticoes and were paved with mosaics, no surprise what we liked most in Zippori were some of these mosaics but also the view from the fortress which is located in the center of the town.

    Zippori National Park Zippori National Park 12th century fortress mansion with a beautiful mosaic Ancient Synagogue
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    Nazareth

    by mindcrime Written Aug 23, 2014

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    Nazareth was part of our itinerary the day we travelled from Tel Aviv to Tiberias. Originally we planned to stop for an hour just to check the famous catholic church of Annunciation but we finally spent more than 4 hours as the city has a lot to offer.

    It’s the largest arab city in Israel with about 82,000 inhabitants with mixed population of muslims and Christians. It is located in the northern Israel 105km NE of Tel Aviv, 45km SE of Haifa, 146km N of Jerusalem, 32km W of Tiberias. It’s an old city that belonged in ancient era in North Palestine and it’s best known as the hometown of Jesus’ parents Joseph and Mary (although he Jesus was born in Bethlehem), churches have been built over sites that claimed to be Joseph’s workshop, Mary’s home, the synagogue where Jesus was taught and later preached, the spring where Virgin Mary came by to draw water when was announced by the archangel Gabriel that she will have a son of God etc Because of all these it’s no surprise many Christian pilgrims travel here as pilgrims and they still do today.

    Greek Orthodox church and Catholics have different options about the location of the Annunciation so it is no surprise you can see and visit two different churches of Annunciation. :) We loved the mosaics from all over the world dedicated to Mary at the catholic church but the orthodox one was more into the spirit. In any case try to visit both churches, they are close to each other (650m). Don’t miss also St.Joseph church near the catholic, it’s simple, peaceful church with great atmosphere.

    Other attractions we saw in Nazareth were the old arab market (nothing special but it’s easy to check as it is located next to the catholic church), Mary’s Well, the synagogue church, the white mosque.

    Nazareth Nazareth ruins Greek Orthodox church catholic church of Annunciation mosaics from all over the world
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    Cana

    by mindcrime Written Aug 23, 2014

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    After a long more than 4 hours tour in Nazareth we passed by Cana (it’s only 9km north of Nazareth) on our way to Tiberias. Unfortunately the heavy traffic didn’t give us any choice and decided to skip Cana, the biblical town of Galilea although bibliography isn’t clear on that with numerous different villages claiming as the read spot of the ancient town.

    It’s not an impressive town anyway but it’s famous as the site where Jesus performed his first public miracle, he was at a wedding feast when his mother told him “boy they have no wine, do something to save the party ” :) And then Jesus used his divine power and turned jars of water into wine! The chief steward tasted and said it was much better than the one the bridegroom served (there was a custom that bridegroom gives the best wine first, then the guests are drunk so they don’t mind to continue with poorer quality, yes yes, it happens to us when we go to a bar).

    It’s one of the miracles that are actually an allegory of good things that are on the way or/and a reference to the appearance of Jesus as the good wine. Many others see it as the antitype of Moses’ miracle of changing water into blood.

    Pilgrims come here for the two churches of Cana (the Roman Catholic and the Greek Orthodox church) and some couples use to renew their wedding vows! If we had some extra time we may had bought some of the local sweet Cana wine :)

    At least on our way out of Cana it was a funny moment that a car with a wedding couple passed by in joy next to us.

    Cana Cana
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    Tiberias

    by mindcrime Written Aug 23, 2014

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    Tiberias is really old, established in 20AD by the roman king Herod Antipas who made it capital of his realm in Galilee, and was named after the roman emperor Tiberius (during the roman period it was known by its greek name Tiveriada). It was built as a spa town around 17 natural hot springs and its still known for this, actually you can find modern spas in the city today.

    Although Tiberias is one of the four jewish Holy Cities (including Jerusalem, Hebron, Safed) for us it was just a large town on the west shore of Sea of Galilee (Lake Kenneret) that we overnight before we kept touring around the beautiful region. Actually many other visitors (especially Christian pilgrims) do the same and use Tiberias as a base because it’s located near Capernaum’s archeological site, Tabgha (miracle of loaves & fishes), river Jordan (the Baptist site is very touristic but we went there anyway) and the Sea of Galilee itself but Tiberias is also near Golan Height(we actually went only until Gadot lookout/Syrian post), the beautiful village of Rosh-Pinna where we went for coffee, the Arbel Cliffs for a breathtaking lookout over the lake, Jethro’s tomb, Degania kibbutz etc.

    The town itself isn’t something special, not that we checked in details but it didn’t look attractive, only from a distance, my main photo here was taken from a hill on the top of the town. It has about 42,000 inhabitants, there are many fish taverns along the promenade, we liked that part where people can stroll around and had dinner when we arrived but the day after we checked out and drove to other towns/attractions (that I already mentioned).

    That’s why we booked a budget hotel which was located uphill, if we have stayed more we’d probably had one near the lake (otherwise we would have to walk a good 20’ down and much more going back). It seemed a quiet town, not many options after dinner, during the day you can visit St.Peters church (12th century), the leaning tower, the Russian Pilgrim’s Inn, the Sea Mosque, rent a bicycle, take a boat tour with Jesus boats or taste some local fishes (named after St.Peter!). We didn’t swim there as there are many other spots to touch the water or try to walk along like Jesus did :)

    Tiberias view point over the city
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    Tomb of prophet Jethro (Nabi Shu’ayb)

    by mindcrime Written Aug 23, 2014

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    The destroyed village of Hittin is located just outside Tiberias so this was an easy drive before we continue on further attractions. We went there to see Nabi Shu’ayb a large mosque-like building that dates from 1880 and houses the tomb of the Islamic prophet Shuaib (prophet Jethro in Bible, father-in-law of Moses), a central figure for Druze religion with numerous pilgrims coming here for centuries. In our days they have an annual celebration, usually in april.

    Unfortunately it was closed to public that morning so we just took some pictures from outside and the general area around. I was surprised with the colorful flag on top of the main building which seems like a flag from a gay parade! :) It stands next to the Israel flag but the five colors represent the five main prophets in Druze religion. Our friends from Israel told me that they have no problem with Druze people as they are always loyal to Israel, they go to the army etc This is a common practice for druze people wherever they live.

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    Arbel National Park

    by mindcrime Updated Aug 23, 2014

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    Arbel Nature Reserve and National Park is just 8km north of Tiberias so we started our tour in the region of Galilee from there. It’s a huge plateau over Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galille) that slopes from Arbel valley to a cliff at the top of Mount Arbel.

    We didn’t really hiked any of the numerous trails of the large (2,600 acre) park (only experienced hikers can follow the steep 400 meters drop from the peak) but we checked the Carob Lookout where we had a breath taking view over the valley and the Sea of Galilee. We stayed there for some minutes taking some pictures but mostly watching down the valley…

    There are not many trees around so use sunscreen and a hat, bring water with you. Hopefully one trees was there and turned to be very useful to avoid the burning sun for a while an read some information about Arbel. It was one of the places that Jesus Christ preached so they have they park on the Jesus Trail that some pilgrims follow. You can also visit the remains of an old Synagogue (2nd century BC) and the cave Fortress where the battle of rebel jews and romans took place in 37BC.

    The park is open 8-16.00 (15.00 on Fridays and holiday eves)
    The entrance fee is 22nis (19nis in group which is more than 30 persons) for adults, 10nis for youths (5-18)

    view from Arbel Cliffs Arbel National Park Arbel National Park view from Arbel Cliffs
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    Yardenit

    by mindcrime Written Aug 23, 2014

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    Just outside Kvutzat Kinneret kibbutz is a popular tourist attraction, the famous Yardenit Baptismal Site where thousands of people (especially Christian pilgrims but not only) come here to touch the waters of river Jordan and many of them to be baptized in its waters.

    Let’s make some things clear first, this is not the original site where baptism of Jesus took place, (according to Matthew) he was baptized by John the Baptist at Qasr el Yahud, 115km further south, just over Dead Sea (so into the West Bank) but the Israel authorities after the Six Day War (1967) closed it down for security reasons and created this one in 1981 near the south shore of Sea of Galilee, 10km south of Tiberias. From what I’ve heard Qasr el Yahud was under renovation and was planned to be open again to the visitors in 2011, but I couldn’t confirm if that ever happened but in any case it doesn’t really matters as no one really can prove about the exact spot.

    For me it’s a just huge tourist trap and not a charming remarkable site as many guidebooks write about it. Hopefully we didn’t have to pay any entrance fee but the whole experience wasn’t spiritual at all, we got inside the site through a huge souvenir store (that you have to cross on your way out again of course) and saw just a small part of the river. There were hundreds of people around screaming and taking photographs while some others wearing white robes were trying to go into water usually following their group’s pastor. If you plan to do this you can rent robes and towels on site, there are also dressing rooms where you can secure your clothes for a small fee, a restaurant/café and as I said the souvenir store.

    Jordan river at Yardenit Yardenit Baptismal Site
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    Degania: The first kibbutz

    by mindcrime Written Aug 23, 2014

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    There are many kibbutz all over Israel, collective communities that started in early 20th century and were based on agriculture and was an utopian community close to socialism idea. All the member of a kibbutz are equal no matter what work each member does and they use to share their land, products and homes. You can actually visit and live in some of them, a great way of an alternative way of travelling.

    Along the south shores of Sea of Galilee there are two kibbutz (Deganya Alef and Deganya Bet), so when we visited Galilee region we decided to take a visit there for a while because Deganya Alef was the first kibbutz in 1909 when Palestine was still under Ottoman rule.

    It was established by a group of ten men and two women that wanted to create an independent, cooperative settlement of Hebrew workers, a place without exploiters and exploited - acommune. Because of the five cereal species of grain in the area they named it Degania (dagan means cereal/grain in Hebrew). Ten years later they another group of pioneers settled in some huts at the nearby Deganya Bet. In 1947 there were 380 people in Deganya Alef but a year later during the Arab Israeli war the kibbutz was destroyed by the Syrian army but the inhabitant resisted till the end and managed to survive and reconstruct their community. From that period is the Syrian tank they managed to capture during the battle and is now at the entrance of the kibbutz (pic 3).

    At the kibbutz we saw a replica of such a house they had (pic 2), it’s impressive that a small hut with 2 rooms only can host so many people. Outside the house is an info board (in Hebrew) that has a great old black and white pic that was taken in 1910 (!), the reconstruction of that first hut happened due to one hundredth anniversary of Kibbutz Deganya, a ceremony took place here with the presence of the prime minister of Israel S.Peres and 6000 people!

    palm trees in Deganya replica of the first kibbutz house Syrian tank
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