`Ajlun Travel Guide

  • Things to Do
    by Robin020
  • Things to Do
    by Robin020
  • `Ajlun
    by Robin020

`Ajlun Things to Do

  • Ajlun Castle

    Also known as Rabadh Castle and Qal'at Al-Rabed, this famous fortress sits on top of a hill just outside the sprawling city of Ajlun. The castle is most famous for being the Saladin stronghold that faced off against the Crusaders who sat in Kerak castle (of Kingdom of Heaven fame) to the south. In fact about 200 of the world's finest crusaders...

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  • The Castle

    In 1214 the castle was enlarged. A fifth tower was added and a bridge decorated with pigeons (those can still be seen) built. Invading Mongols destroyed the castle in 1260, but it was soon recaptured by the Mamluks who restored it. It is very nice to walk around the labyrinth of rooms exploring, and then take a rest at the top of one of the towers,...

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  • The view

    The view from the top of the towers is great. If the weather is clear you can look out over the Jordan Valley and even see the Dead Sea (the Dead Sea could not be seen when I was there).Being on a hill the castle was one in a chain of pigeon posts and beacons, which allowed messages to be transmitted from Euphrate River to Cairo in one day.

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  • To Ajlun

    I had planed to visit Ajlun and Jerash on a daytrip from Amman using public transport, but was a bit concerned if I was going to be in time to catch the last bus back from Jerash (I had got mixed reports of when it was leaving).As I had breakfast in the hotel in the morning I was going I heard a French couple talking to the man in the reception and...

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  • The museum

    In one of the rooms of Qala?at ar Rabad there is a small museum with items from nearby excavations. The museum was closed as we arrived, but after walking around in the castle for a while we saw it had opened and went there.The castle is open daily.April - October 8am - 7pmNovember - March 8am - 5pmEntrance fee to the castle is 1 JD (July 2005).

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  • Qala'at ar-Rabad (Aljun Castle)

    This is a really cool castle located just 30 minutes away from Jerash. Supposedly it has spectacular view over the Valley of Jordan but you might want to go on a clearer day than I did. However, the fog did create a feeling that old ghosts were going to appear at any time. Among the ruins there's a small museum near the entrance. It's worth looking...

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  • Landscape

    This part of Jordan is one of the most fertile regions, it is seldom that rain fails to fall here. From the castle one has an impressive view over the cultivated terraces nearby. The grass is lush as you see, and the goats are finding ample forage. If the weather is fine you can see the lake of Tiberias, Wadi Kufranjah, Wadi Rajeb, Wadi al-Yabes...

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  • Qalat Ajlun: history (3)

    In the Ottoman period a contingent of fifty soldiers was set uo in the castle. During the first quarter of the seventeenth century, Prince Fakhr ad-Din al-Ma'ni II used it during his fight against Ahmad ibn Tarbay. He supplied the castle with a contingent and provided provisions and ammunition. In 1812, the Swiss traveller J.L. Burkhardt found the...

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  • Qalat Ajlun: history (2)

    In the 1260 AD, the Mongols destroyed sections of the castle including its battlements. Soon after the victory of the Mamluks over the Mongols ar 'Ain Jalut, Sultan al-Dhaher Baibars restored the castle and cleared the fosse. The castle was used as a storehouse for crops and provisions. 'Izz ad-Din Aibak was appointed governor. He renovated the...

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  • Qalat Ajlun: history (1)

    After Usama's death, the castle was enlarged in the 1214-1215 AD by Aibak ibn 'Abdallah, majordomo of al-Mu'azzam 'Isa. He added a new tower in the southeast corner and built the gate, which is decorated with pigeon reliefs. In the middle of the 13th century, the castle was conceded to Salah ad-Din Yousef ibn Ayoub, King of Aleppo and Damascus, who...

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  • Qalat Ajlun: history

    Another major objective of Salah ad-Din was to develop and control the iron mines of the 'Ajlun. the original core castle had four corner towers, now you can see only the ruins of two of them (in the photos). Arrow slits were incorporated in the thinck wall and it was surrounded by a fosse averaging 16 metres in width and 12-15 metres in depth,...

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  • Qalat Ajlun

    In the 1184 AD, 'Izz ad-Din Usama ibn Munqidh, a commander and nephew of Salah ad-Din al-'Ayyubi (Saladin), built a small fortress on the Jabal Beni. From its situation, the fortress dominated a wide stretch of the northern Jordan Valley, controlled three main passages to it: Wadi Kufranjah, Wadi Rajeb and Wadi al-Yabes. It also protected the...

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  • Interesting inside too...

    Inside, the castle is actually quite small (I come from Britain so I suppose I'm a bit spoilt for huge castles!) But nonetheless, it's full of dark rooms, old banquet halls, and steep staircases. The guys who work there periodically drown the dusty ground with water, which keeps the passageways delightfully cool and airy. When it's quiet it's easy...

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  • Great views outside

    You can see why this spot was chosen for a strategic military castle. Apparently on a sunny day you can see all across the Jordan Valley and even into modern Israel. In October, however, winter is approaching and the skies are colder and duller and the view is a bit more limited.Still, you can see the nearby new town of Ajlun, the gentle tree-lined...

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  • The History, Part 3: Earthquake!

    In the Ottoman period a contingent of 50 soldiers was set up in the castle. During the first quarter of the 17th century AD, Prince Fakhr ad-Din al-Ma'ni II used it during his fight against Ahmad ibn Tarbay. He supplied the castle with a contingent and provided provisions and ammunition. In 1812, the Swiss traveller J.L. Burkhardt found the castle...

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`Ajlun Transportation

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    by antistar Written Jan 17, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    For less than 1JD you can travel by bus to Jerash (about 30 minutes), Amman (about 1 and a half hours) and even Madaba. Whatever you do, it's a good idea to combine a trip to Ajlun with a trip to nearby (and absolutely unmissable) Jerash. A taxi will also do the trip to Ajlun and Jerash, but look at paying around 30 or 40JD from Amman or Madaba respectively.

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`Ajlun Favorites

  • Aljun Castle Tower

    The view of this tower is just amazing appearing out of the fog. The original castle had four corner towers, of which you can see only the ruins of two of them. Arrow slits were incorporated in the wall and it was surrounded by a moat averaging 16 metres in width and 12-15 metres in depth.

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  • Exploring the Castle

    Exploring every inch of the castle is worth it. There are countless areas that you can find. It's full of dark rooms, old banquet halls, and steep staircases.

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  • Inside the Castle

    The inside of the castle is well lit and gives you an idea of what it was like to live during the crusades. Go up to the gate and see where they planned to dump burning oil on invaders. Now aren't you glad that we live in a "civilized" world of atomic and smart bombs?

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