Roman Forum, Amman

4 out of 5 stars 6 Reviews

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  • A Mediaeval construction among the forum ruins
    A Mediaeval construction among the forum...
    by mikey_e
  • More of the pillasters
    More of the pillasters
    by mikey_e
  • A pillaster from the forum
    A pillaster from the forum
    by mikey_e
  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Under Construction (again)

    by mikey_e Written Nov 22, 2012

    Much the same as the Roman Theatre (which is right next to it), the Roman Forum was constructed in the 2nd Century AD, when Amman was part of the Roman Empire and known as Philadelphia. Unfortunately, there is not much that can be said about the Forum, as when I was there it was either under restoration or largely boarded up because of the construction of a massive square very close to it. There were, however, various pillars and pillasters on display, but these were left almost as an approach to the theatre, rather than as part of a separate archeological attraction.

    Columns from the forum A pillaster from the forum More line-ups of ruins A Mediaeval construction among the forum ruins More of the pillasters
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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  • PierreZA's Profile Photo

    Roman Forum and Odeon

    by PierreZA Written Jun 6, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Forum, the area in front of the Roman Theatre, is part of the remains of the old Roman city Amman was built on. The colonnaded path in front of the theatre is quite long and impressive.

    The Odeon is facing the Forum and is adjacent to the Roman Theatre. You use the same ticket bought for the Roman Theatre to visit the Odeon. It is beautifully renovated and worth a visit.

    Roman Forum Odeon
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • wilocrek's Profile Photo

    Roman Ruins

    by wilocrek Written Apr 18, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Roman ruins in Amman are worth seeing for several reasons, for one thing they sit up on a hill that overlooks the city offering terrific views. The ruins themselves, while small, are still another lasting testament to the glory of Rome. Plus the Jordanians don't police the area so tourists are free to climb around and on the ruins...something you can't do in Rome. Also the museum on the site has some interesting things to see including old coins and some Dead Sea Scrolls as well.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    The Roman Forum

    by MM212 Updated Sep 11, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bordered by the Amphitheatre one side and the Odeon on another, Philadelphia's Forum was one of the largest squares in the Roman Empire. The Forum dates from 190 AD and was the centre of city life during the Roman period. Only small sections of the surrounding colonnades have survived to this day, with the few well-preserved columns captured in the attached photographs. The colonnades were on three sides of this large square, while the northern side opened to a stream now buried under the modern streets.

    Philadelphia's Forum, Aug 2008 The colonnade, Aug 2008 August 2008 August 2008 The Amphitheatre in the background, Aug 2008
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    The Columns of the Forum

    by MiguelMV Written Jan 8, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Next to the roman theatre, there are still some vestiges of the forum and the cardo maximus (the main street in a roman city). The colums that remain take you for some moments to the ancient roman times. It's nice to have a walk around the area.

    Me at Amman's roman forum The Cardo Maximo of Amman
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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  • Djinn76's Profile Photo

    The Forum

    by Djinn76 Written Dec 27, 2004

    Except maybe for the shape, not much left from this huge roman square. It was then know as one of the biggest square of the empire.
    Nowadays this huge square is still a popular meeting point. If you stop by, you can expect some non-english-speaking guys almost forcing you to taste their mint tea… Since nothing is for free, don’t forget to give him a couple of coins…

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