Monastery, Petra

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Wadi ad-Deir

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  • wandering360's Profile Photo

    al Deir (The Monastery)

    by wandering360 Updated Nov 28, 2011

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    al Deir (The Monastery), Petra

    Continuing from the Royal Tombs through the Collanaded Street to Qasr al-Bint al-Faroun (Castle of the Pharoah's Daughter, the only free standing structure in Petra) and then a further one half hour climb is the Monastery. Built in 3rd Century BC, it is similar to the Khazneh. However, it is 50m wide and 45m high.

    On your route to/from the Monastery, take time to look at some of the caves. In 1997, it would appear that some of them are still inhabited.

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    Expensive entrance fees to Petra

    by Robin020 Written Nov 28, 2011

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    The entrance fees is 50 Dinar for a day visit 55 for 2 days visit 70 for 3 das visit
    .No cash points (ATM) around.
    if you want to go to the monastry you need at least 30 to 40 min walk many stairs.
    My advice is to rent a donkey ,I myself did not it was a mistake cous it was not easy.

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    Well worth the trouble to get there

    by stevemt Updated Mar 14, 2011

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    This place is supurb. It is well worth the trouble to get here

    I semi cheated and took a donkey up and walked down, well worth the extra expence.

    Beware that there are hundreds of steps to climb, and it takes aprox 1 hour or more to do so.

    At the top as well as the monastry there is a cafe where you can get food and drink.

    Souvenir stalls also line some of the steps up.

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    Ad-Deir

    by PierreZA Written May 24, 2009

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    Although it takes some effort to get to The Monastery, you will be awarded for the trouble.
    The hike up the mountainous terrain might be considered as difficult for some people, and you might see very obese tourists on the back of small donkeys. I will rather not comment on this.

    Take enough water with you. There is ‘restaurant’ at the top of the mountain.

    Other than the Monastery, there are also several look out points on high cliffs from where you will be rewarded with spectacular views!

    The Monastery is huge, and reminds a lot of The Treasury, but it seems a much more simple design.

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  • Aitana's Profile Photo

    The Monastery

    by Aitana Updated May 9, 2009

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    After a long way up among tombs, you finally arrive to the Monastery. This building was used as a church during the Byzantine period, that's the origin of the name.
    Once on top of the mountain, the view of the mountains and valleys around also rewards for the climbing.

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    High on a Mountain Top...

    by wilocrek Updated Apr 23, 2009

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    While the Treasury may be the face of Petra, the Monastery may very well be its heart and soul. Sitting high up in the mountains and with its towering facade that is even more impressive than that of the Treasury the Monastery is a perfect must see complement. Part of the reason the Treasury gets as much love as it does is that its easy to visit while seeing the Monastery requires a 40 minute hike up a mountain trail. But anything worth seeing requires a little effort and the Monastery is worth the effort. With it scenic setting high above Petra its easy to understand why the Nabetaeans chose that location for the Monastery...it is very peaceful and serene. From the Treasury it will take the average tourist about an hour and fifteen minutes to get to the Monastery so be sure to factor that it if your only in Petra for a day. The locals offer donkey rides to the top so if your looking for an easier way up that would be it. However the trail itself is very hiker friendly and I saw many senior citizens that made the hike. So in other words there isn't any excuse not to visit the Monastery during your visit to Petra!

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    Visit the view points

    by PeteG Written Dec 2, 2008

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    Once you've made it up to the Monastry, don't give up. Walk the last bit to the 3 or 4 different view points looking out over the mountains and south part of the Dead Sea in the distance. It is so worth the walk for the absolutely stunning views.

    Each view point has a little tented shop and you can get a tea from a couple of them.

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    Ride to The Monastry

    by PeteG Written Dec 2, 2008

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    Air-conditioned 4 x 4 taxi

    Your time walking around Petra will be stunning, but it will also involve a fair amount of walking. For example, in my opinion, you need to leave yourself 1 hour 30 minutes to walk from the Monastry back out to the entrance.

    The walk up to the Monastry is 850 steps and I can imagine in the height of summer is a bit of a killer. You can save your legs by going by donkey or mule the vast majority of the way up. You can allow yourself to get a bit ripped off by the owners of the animals, but you can easily go up for 4JD which I think is well worth it and is also a great fun experience. The donkeys and mules all looked in extremely good condition and well looked after.

    You will be offered a donkey (or air conditioned four-by-four) almost everywhere in Petra, but I'd get one from the bottom of the climb up to the Monastry.

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    visit the monestary.

    by cachaseiro Updated Oct 23, 2008

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    the monestary.

    The monestary is located right by the very back of petra and it´s a long and steep hike to get there, buit you are awarded with one of the most stunning buildings in Petra once you get there, so take your time to see this place if you have the stamina for it.

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    The Monastery

    by tim07 Updated Feb 10, 2008

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    Similar in design to the Treasury & just as impressive, far bigger though 50m wide & 45m high. The Monastery with its towering columns & large urn flanked by two half pediments is definately worth the walk or ride up to it.

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    The Monastery

    by Bregman Written Dec 28, 2007

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    The Monastery is another beautiful site, only it is not as accessible as the Treasury... You will need to climb a few hundreds steps to get here. You can hire a donkey if you don't want to do it on foot. Once you up there, after seeing the monastery, continue a little further up for a spectacular view, westwards towards Wadi Araba.

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    850 steps up ... worth every step.

    by onfoot Written Feb 16, 2007

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    The monastrey, or as we call it (el Dair) ...
    You`ll need at least 1h0-1h30 hour to get to the top. Or 1h00 if you`re on a donkey.
    Though I`ve never took the donkey people seems to enjoy it a lot.
    On the way up, you`ll meet some people selling stones, jewllery & other souvenirs (some are from India!!) ... if you notice a tea pot, I recommend you stop & ask for a drink. They won`t charge you for it, but you may want to buy something from them after that.
    Most bedouins speak other languages, they pick it up from tourists. so over a cup of tea, you may get an in-depth talk with one of the locals.
    The scene at the top is breath taking .....

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    • Hiking and Walking

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    Al Deir

    by antistar Written Jan 27, 2007

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    Al Deir
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    This is the biggest and most impressive carved buildings in all of Petra. You have to earn the view, however. A would-be guide insisted that there were possibly as many as 900 steps to the top, and that I would definitely have need of a donkey. I didn't believe him. But he wasn't lying. I counted at least 800 steps, and I think there could have been more. My brain became a bit frazzled from all the exhausting climbing.

    It's a tough climb, but if you are reasonably fit you can do it without help. Just take regular breaks to admire the view. If you need it, there are donkeys waiting for you all the way along the route, like vultures waiting for the weak to drop. That's a harsh description, but that's how I felt as I struggled up the steps in the heat. And it was hot in winter. I'd hate to imagine the strain on my heart in the heat of the summer sun.

    But the effort is worth it. The building is not only stunning, but its location high in the mountains makes for an amazing backdrop. There are plenty of high points just around the temple which allow you to look down and get a great view. Just a little further beyond the temple you can look out over the vast mountain range that surrounds the city. The marked routes take you deeper and deeper into Wadi Araba, if you have the time to explore.

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  • Davancar's Profile Photo

    Don't miss the monastry

    by Davancar Written Jan 25, 2007

    Its a bit of a climb to get up to the so called monastry but well worth the effort. You can also ride up and down on a donkey as there are plenty around but you wouldn't catch me on one of those things. The views from the top are spectacular and there is of course the obligatory tea tent.

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  • kentishgirl's Profile Photo

    The Monastery

    by kentishgirl Updated Jan 16, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Monastrey


    After the climb up you will no doubt be dying to see this smashing monument.
    In my opinion the Monastery and the Treasurey are the must sees at Petra - if you see nothing else make sure that you at least see these.

    The Monastery is huge and looks beautiful.

    You will no doubt be thirsty after the walk up - dont fear - just opposite the monastrey is a bar with cosy cushion sitting areas!

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