Qasr `Amrah Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by leics
  • Things to Do
    by leics
  • Things to Do
    by leics

Most Recent Things to Do in Qasr `Amrah

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Definitely not a castle....

    by leics Written Jan 25, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You'll find more detail about this unique place in my Qasr Amrah intro page.

    The hunting lodge and baths now called Qasr Amrah (one of the so-called 'desert castles' of Jordan) were almost certainly built for the Umayyad caliph Walid l between 711 and 715 CE/AD. Although originally beautifully decorated with frescoes (those frescoes are why it is unique) it is a pretty small building and clearly wan't intended for any sort of long-term stay. One might think of it more as an overnight rest-stop or a 'short break' location rather than being used for long hunting trips.

    The beautiful fresco decorations inside cover almost all surfaces in the rooms of both the main building and the smallish bath house which is attached to it. Their uniqueness lies in the fact that they show both human and animal forms, the depiction of which is forbidden by Islam. Although the order was given for them to be destroyed only a few years after they were created that order was, for unknown reasons, never acted upon. The 1300-year-old frescoes have been damaged by fire and graffiti-ed upon over subsequent centuries but enough of them remains visible to give a good idea about how beautiful this place once was.

    I was particularly taken with the rounded almost-naked ladies which appeared in various places in various rooms, although the hunting scenes were interesting too. We learn such a lot about life in the past from this sort of depiction.

    Qasr Amrah is open from 8am every day, closing at 6 in summer and at 4 in winter. There's a small visitor centre (with toilets) and its joint entrance ticket also allows you to visit Qasr Kharana and Qasr Azraq.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maria81's Profile Photo

    The Dome of Heaven

    by Maria81 Written Apr 25, 2011

    Where?

    In the calidarium, the last room one visits in Qasr 'Amrah

    What?

    The Dome of Heaven is a map of the sky of the Northern hemisphere, showing both the largest constellations and the zodiac signs. The room is small, so if the castle is crowded, you're unlikely to have a chance to linger long enough to identify all of the signs. If you can't, there's a very helpful map at the visitors' centre which will point them out (the visitors' centre is in the same building as the ticket office)

    The Dome of Heaven
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Desert Castle

    by antistar Written Jan 8, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Qasr Al Amra one of the famous desert castles east of Amman. It was built in the 8th century AD, by Umayyad caliph Walid I. The castle was used as a hunting retreat by the caliph and his family, hence the walls are covered in glorious frescoes, depicting hunting of all kinds of strange animals. There were also some badly drawn depictions of naked women, normally banned in Islam, which my old Bedouin tour guide, Hazim, found particularly racy. I guess it gets a bit lonely stuck out there in the desert.

    The Desert Castles cost just 1 dinar for a ticket that covers entrance to all three. The guides are not included in the price, or paid by the government, so give them some money, even if they don't ask for any, like Hazim forgot to.

    Qasr Al Amra Qasr Al Amra Qasr Al Amra

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Transport

    by MalenaN Updated Jan 25, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I visited Qusayr Amra as part of a tour (only transport) organised from Farah Hotel in Amman. We were three people in the car sharing the price and I paid 13 JD. The places we visited were Qasr Kharana, Qusayr Amra, Qasr al-Azraq and the Wetland Reserve, Hammam Sarah and Qasr al-Hallabat (in the mentioned order).
    We had lunch in Azraq and the driver told us about a restaurant were tours could have lunch (and it was cheaper if we came from Farah Hotel, 3,5 JD), but we preferred to have a falafel at a café. They were very tasty and was 250 fils. We asked if it was possible to visit the Wetland Reserve (it was not in the original plan) and the driver was happy because then he could go to the mosque after letting us off at the Visitor Centre.

    Cupola in the Hammam
    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • MiguelMV's Profile Photo

    The paintings in the main hall

    by MiguelMV Updated Jan 16, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Some of the frescos in the vaults of the main hall represent a homage to all those who worked in the building of the castle. There are some other motives, including some sexual scenes too, something really rare in islamic art. In one of the walls you can see frescos of six of the kings of the medieval times, with their names in arabic and greek, which represent the victories of the ummayds.

    Details of the frescos at Qasr Amrah
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • MiguelMV's Profile Photo

    Qasr Amrah

    by MiguelMV Updated Jan 16, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The castle is one of Jordan's most importat medieval monuments. It was built between 705 - 715 under the command of Walidi I, who also ordered the building of Damasque's mosque. This castle is very small, but has some unique paitings in islamic art. There are human figures painted in the frescos that cover the vaults. It also has a hamman full of paitings, where you can see the zodiac constellations. It is a really charming place.

    The castle
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • MiguelMV's Profile Photo

    The frescos at the hamman

    by MiguelMV Written Jan 16, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The most beautiful frescos of the castle are located in the vault at the hammam. It has details of the zodiac constellations. Some of them are now gone, but you can still see some of the zocial symbols, such as Sagitarius. The bath itself has three parts or rooms (the warm and resting room, the cold room and the hot room), each of them with frescos covering the ceilings and vaults.

    The vault in the hamman at Qasr Amrah
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Hammam

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Jul 31, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The hamman is divided in three different rooms: Apodyterium (dressing room), a tepidarium and one calidarium.
    The first room that you can see is the tepidarium. It has got a hiding arch. On the roof there are nice painting of animals and a figure of a nude woman. A very strange painting in this room is the face of a man which the scholars think it is Jesus.

    The face of Jesus
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Calidarium

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Jul 31, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In this room you can see a big bathtub, On the roof of the cupula, above the bathtub, there is a fantastic painting of the sky-blue map, which reproduce the North Emisphere. You can recognice the Zodiac constellations and some characters of the Greek and Roman mitology.

    Sky.-blue map
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Woman that exit from an hammam

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Jul 31, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Near the painting of the six kings there is the painting of a woman on a sofa and all around her there are many figures.
    On the right you can see a nice painting of a woman that exit from an hammam. On the same wall there are many hunting paintings.

    Woman that exit from an hammam
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Painting of the Six Kings

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Jul 31, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On the west wall you can see the painting of the six sovereigns, four of which are been identified with the emperor of Bisanzium, the visigot king Rodrigo, the last Sasanide sovereign Cosroe and the Negus abyss. Everyone of them was hostile of the Islam and they are represented in the act to give back tibute to the caliph.

    Paintins of the Six Kings
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Paintings

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Jul 31, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The inside of the room of the audiences is decorated with wonderful paintings. The paintings have been attributed to Syrian or Arab artists affected by the Byzantine art. The roof of the central nave is decorated with rural scenes in which one appears on feminine crowned by a victory.

    Rural scenes
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Qasr 'Amrah: history

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Jul 31, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The castle of Qasr 'Amrah was probably built by the Umayyad caliph Walid I (705-715 AD), the same caliph that built the mosque of the Umayyads in Damascus. The castle was originally a place of relax and an hunting reserve from time to time used as a temporary lodging for member of the rullin Umayyad family. Some scholars think that it was built to protect the track of al-Azraq, Kharanaj and Qasr at-Tubah.
    In the begining of 1970 the castle was restored thanks to the Austrian, French and Spanish government and now it his the second monument (after Petra) in the World Heritage List.

    Qasr 'Amrah
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Audience room

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Jul 31, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The audience room rappresent the main building of the castle. It is 10 metres long and it has got three arcs to sixth lightly acute that create three naves. The central nave finishes in a withdrawal which was the room of the throne. The side naves lengthen on two little Alcoves which open on the room.

    Paintings in room of the throne
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • triplehelix's Profile Photo

    Mini Museum

    by triplehelix Written Apr 3, 2008

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Qas'r Amra is probably the most popular of the Desert Castles to visit along the trail. The site houses artifacts and a brief wall of history in its museum.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Qasr `Amrah

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

35 travelers online now

Comments

Qasr `Amrah Travel Guide

Qasr `Amrah Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Qasr `Amrah things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Qasr `Amrah sightseeing.

View all Qasr `Amrah hotels