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  • Welcome to Kuwait
    Welcome to Kuwait
    by jlanza29
  • Small but confusing !!!!
    Small but confusing !!!!
    by jlanza29
  • The Lighthouse, Protestant Complex
    The Lighthouse, Protestant Complex
    by pangtidor

Most Viewed Favorites in Kuwait

  • kammeres's Profile Photo

    Tourist Visa

    by kammeres Written Feb 8, 2009

    Favorite thing: I spent a very short time here, en route to Iraq, but quiickly learned something worth passing on. Kuwait charges 3 Kuwaiti Dinar (KD) for a tourist visa. Those who haven't brought any KD with them would be wise to get them at the bank currency exchange in the Kuwait City airport, across the main hall from the visa counter. The bank charges the current official rate, much better than the unofficial "street" rate from commercial exchanges and merchants. I came through in Nov 2008 and paid the official rate of 3.74 USD per KD. The visa counter accepts dollars and other currencies, but charges an arbitrary "street" rate (4, 5 or more dollars per KD), and gives change back in KD, so if all you have is a $100 bill and don't feel like changing it, you'll take a bath. I paid the equivalent of $11.22 for my visa; a lady in front of me used a $20 bill and got back a miniscule pinch of small coins - ouch. Tightwad advice, I know, but one of the drawbacks of Kuwait's Westernization is that you'll get nickel-and-dimed to death. Any chance to economize will help.

    Morning view east from Marriott Hotel, 9 Nov 08
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  • Working Days and National Holidays

    by pangtidor Updated May 14, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The weekend in Kuwait will be on FRIDAY AND SATURDAY (from September 2007). It was on thursday and friday before. The ministry offices will be opened from Sunday to thursday,from 0800AM to 0100PM.Some offices will be opened few hours in the afternoon.BANKS CLOSE ON FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, and will be opened at MORNING TO EVENING FROM SUNDAY TO THURSDAY with 3-4hours breaking time in between. February 25-26 will be national holidays for Kuwait independent day and national day.BE AWARE WITH RAMADAN MONTH.In 2006,Ramadan month started on september 23.During that ramadan month, the offices and stores opening hours will be different, opened an hour later and closed an hour earlier. All the restaurants will be closed during the day time in Ramadhan month. Ramadan month won`t be the same time every year as it uses the lunar calendar.Anyway, the starting date usually will be 10 days ahead from the previous year`s.There will be some moslem holidays in a year like Eid Fitri, Eid Adha, Prophet Mohamed Birthday (Maulid), Hijri New Year, and Isra Miraj; the date will not be the same each year.When the holiday will be coming on Friday or saturday, they will have an other holiday day on the following workdays to replace their weekend holiday.:-)).
    Kuwait is a moslem country so you cannt expect christmas and easter time will be public holidays here, The New Year January 1st will be the holiday though. Whenever The King (=Ameer) or Prime Minister died, 3-4 days public holiday will be there as the mourning days.

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  • The Christian

    by pangtidor Written Apr 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Kuwait is a Moslem country but the Christians are free to worship in the churches here. The biggest complex of the Christian church will be located at the Kuwait City, nearby the Arabic Gulf Street and Supreme Court building. The complex divided into 2 big sections: one for the Catholic and the other one for the Protestant. The churches offer services in many languages and the English language services will be always available on Friday and Sunday.

    The Lighthouse, Protestant Complex
    Related to:
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    • Work Abroad

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  • The Drinking Water Fountain

    by pangtidor Written Apr 28, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The water supply of Kuwait comes from the sea with a good distillation and standardized supervision. You may see the water counter or fountain all around the country. The water is safe and potable there. You could find that it is interesting to see many kinds and shapes of the water fountain in Kuwait.

    Drinking Water
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  • Al-Boom, Kuwaity sailing ship for souvenir

    by pangtidor Updated Mar 16, 2007

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    Favorite thing: It will be a great souvenir for your loved ones back at home. Al Boom has been honored as a part of Kuwait history. You can see it in The State of Kuwait `s National Sign. The price depends on the material. See my antique shop in shopping tip.

    Al-Boom,Kuwaity sailing ship AL-Boom,Kuwaity sailing ship miniatur
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  • INSYAALAH formalities

    by pangtidor Written Feb 16, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Are you going to do any paper work in any ministries in Kuwait? INSYAALAH, they will do it as their wish.:-))You have to call all the saints and Lords to give you as much patience as they could.After waiting for a long time in your home country (takes one year in many cases for working visa), you will still spend your first one-two months in Kuwait to process your residency, salary account, higher education, etc. Everytime you will follow up your paper in the Ministry, the word INSYAALAH is being misused to cover their laziness.:-)).INSYAALAH means `in God will`.Frankly speaking it will be let us hope God will remind me to do my work.:-))Do not come on the early morning for your paper work, the boss will come 1-2hours late and all the workers will spend their first 1-2hours at work on tea or coffee.Stand on the line will be useless when any Kuwaities will just go straight with their ridiculous `wasta` thing.Wasta doesn`t mean as a bribe money to quicken your paper, but ` a powerful name who is known in that ministry`.When they are not in the mood to work, they will just INSYAALAH and you will see your paper will be laying on the desk and they will even ask you to come tomorrow.INSYAALAH BUKRA.It means let us hope God will remind me to do my work tomorrow.;-)) Well, INSYAALAH you will be patient.:-))

    Related to:
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  • Kuwait Dinar, Is it the highest currency?

    by pangtidor Written Dec 20, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: As far as I know, Kuwait Dinar is the highest currency in the world.1US$=0.289KD (Kuwait Dinar) so the price will be triple than US$.It won`t be practical for you to bring out KD to other countries besides GCC countries.Whenever you travel to Kuwait with some cash money with you, US $ and Euro will be fine to bring along with.You may sell your any foreign currency in money exchange complex, Mubarakia Market area.
    1KD=1000fills.It is quite odd when we compare with other currencies which have 100 for smaller conversion.Kuwait Dinar notes will be available from 0.250KD (250fills), 0.500KD (500fills), 1KD, 5KD, 10KD, and 20KD.All the KD notes will have both English and Arabic prints on them.The coins will be available for 1fills,5fills,10fills,20fills,50fills,and 100fills.They will be in gold and silver color.The problem with coins are the numbers showed in Arabic only.Anyway,it is really easy to remember the basic arabic numbers.Zero OF ARABIC = A DOT, One = LIKE NUMBER ONE IN LATIN, FIVE OF ARABIC= ZERO, TWO OF ARABIC= SEVEN WITH THE HEAD END ON THE RIGHT INSTEAD OF LEFT.Though the way they write from the back to the front or from the right to the left, WRITING NUMBERS OR DATES IN ARABIC WILL BE LIKE ENGLISH SYSTEM.It will be usefull for you to carry some 100fills or 50fills with you as all the vending machines and parking fees will be using these coins.

    20Kuwait Dinars 10 Kuwait Dinars
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  • Ramadhan Activities

    by pangtidor Updated Jul 2, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Ramadhan is a month before Eid,moslem celebration, when moslems will do fasting during daytime.It will be on lunar calendar, so it won`t be on the same time every year.It will be started on the last week of September in 2006 and will be delayed 10days for following years.YOU CAN NOT EAT AND DRINK in public on daytime during this time.Working hours will be short during daytime, and some public services will have extra hours during night time.Stores will be closed most of the day and will be opened until midnight.

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  • american_tourister's Profile Photo

    Beautiful sea water

    by american_tourister Written Jan 23, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Kuwait is at the top end of the Persian Gulf and has some beautiful water. It is for the most part very clear and clean. It is very, very salty and you can float in it quite easily.

    Water flows into the straits of Hormuz and just evaporates. Because of the evaporation rate the minerals stay behind making the water more mineral laden. This makes the Persian Gulf the saltiest body of open ocean water in the world.

    Water, what water
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  • american_tourister's Profile Photo

    Emir's Palace

    by american_tourister Updated Apr 22, 2004

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Take the tour of the Emir's Palace. The American Embassy wrangled a tour for us in 1982. He was not there and we did not see much but it is gaudy as all get out.

    Fondest memory: Finding a Canadian girl who had a bottle of Scotch Whiskey. She was with a team of softball players from Dubai. I came from Bahrain. We killed the bottle and........

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  • Visit the 3 famous towers that...

    by Lebanese Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Visit the 3 famous towers that looks like water tanks at the corniche (seaside). Although I was not very impressed with them but since they were built in the 70s where there were not a lot of tallbuildings at that time, I think they were impressive then

    Fondest memory: Food, food and food...that's the most immense memory of Kuwait. I guess due to the hot weather for most of the year and hence the lack of outdoor activities, people resort to indoors and mostly resturants

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  • Guardian624's General Tip

    by Guardian624 Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: I drove into Kuwait City the day the truce was called at the end of Desert Storm. Random buildings were destroyed, signs of pillaging were everywhere, and evidence of Iraqi atrocities. My last trip into the city a month later, the city was already on the road to recovery. It must be a much better place now.

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  • pyahya's Profile Photo

    Kuwait Towers The Kuwait...

    by pyahya Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Kuwait Towers
    The Kuwait Towers have become the most famous landmark in the country. These three unique towers have a dual function as both entertainment facilities and water reservoirs. The upper sphere of the main tower has a revolving observation deck with a cafeteria that gives the visitor a full panoramic view of Kuwait City and the Arabian Gulf every half hour. The top half of the lower sphere houses three excellent restaurants, while the bottom section is a one million gallon water resevoir.
    If you would like to cool off on a hot summer day, the ice skating rinks are where to go. The first in the Gulf and the Middle East, the two rinks provide year round winter sports. The main building has an olympic-sized rink with seating capacity for 1,600. Kuwait's ice Hockey team, the Kuwait Falcons, use this rink for their competiton games. Entertainment City This is Kuwait's answer to Disneyland. Located 12 miles north of Kuwait City, it offers more than 40 rides, games and shows with three different themes: Arab World, International World and Future World.

    Fondest memory: I was there from 1990 till 1993, what best and most memory, I really can not describe it but I can by my poem,' Beauty, unlike Love or Friendship or even Life, brings its own sweet reward. You don't have to bring Beauty into existence. You don't have to work at it. All that is required is that you appreciate it' all I can do is appreciate all the friend I made in 3 yrs been in Kuwait.

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  • All our friends back home, and...

    by Divingmouse Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: All our friends back home, and friends from VT, ask us what is it really really like to live in Kuwait. I know this is long- in-the tooth, so sit back relax and we will tell you what it is REALLY REALLY like to live here.
    First of all a little history, Kuwait lies at the head of the Arabian Gulf, between latitude 28 and 30 north and longitude 46 and 48 east. The land area of Kuwait is approximately 7,500 square miles, or roughly the size of Wales and is for the most part, flat. It has no rivers and no lakes. It is bounded on the west and north by Iraq, on the east by the Arabian Gulf and on the south by Saudi Arabia. There are nine islands, the largest of which are Failaka, Bubiyan and Warba, although none of them are inhabited. The Head of State is the Amir, who has appointed a Prime Minister (who happens to be a relative) to oversee all things political.Language:Although Arabic is the official language English is very widely used and all road signs etc. are bilingual. English is also the official language for major contracts. Kuwaitis do not expect westerners to know their language and there is generally little difficulty in making oneself understood in English. It does however help oil the wheels if one comes out with the odd phrase or two of Arabic, particularly those of courtesy and greeting. Do not be afraid that by using the odd phrase an Arab will assume that you have a wide knowledge of his language and will launch into a long spiel by way of a reply; it rarely happens that way. The more usual reaction is that he gives you an appreciative smile and then proceeds to show you how good his English is. Most people on arrival soon pick up phrases like ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ and also acquire the ability to count, i.e., to find out prices; it is also necessary to learn a new set of written numbers as our so-called 'Arabic numerals' are different from theirs. Beyond that stage, few expats venture and even fewer delve into the mysteries of the Arabic alphabet which is written from right to left. Hindi and Tagalog are also widely spoken in their own respective circles.Climate:To say the least the ambient temperature is hot in summer, with official temperatures of 50°C being registered and 55 being the unofficial high in July and August. Humidity at this time of year is usually very low, due to the Northwesterly winds being hot and dry. Southeasterly winds, usually hot and damp, occur during July and October. Humidity can reach the 90% range at this time, making it extremely unpleasant, and spectacle wearers should take care when leaving air conditioning as a thick fog soon appears. What may also surprise you is how cold a winter morning can be. It has been known to approach zero, however hell very rarely freezes over. Sand storms are frequent especially in summer. Rain is almost nonexistent and comes in short bursts, when it can be bothered, and amounts to some six inches a year, however, due to poor drainage floods do occur, especially in low lying areas such as underpasses and basements, and deaths were reported a few years ago due to not realizing that the road under a bridge isn’t actually flat. Summer is deemed to run from May to October & Autumn and Spring can be equated to a North American summer, only dry! As an obvious word of warning, if you are a little thin on top (or have short cropped hair), wear a hat; a sun burnt scalp is not pleasant.Social Customs:The lack of provision for social life arises from a basic cultural difference in Arab life in that they are extended-family-orientated and have fewer social contacts outside the family circle, whereas the reverse is true for Westerners. The Arabs spend most of their time visiting family members’ homes and have less need for external provisions for social life of the kind we would take for granted. A further, direct consequence is that social contact between Arabs and Westerners is largely nonexistent, no matter how friendly they are in work. Another constraint on social life is that a bachelor is considered a dangerous man to an Arab and as such is a threat to his wife and daughters. He is therefore to be avoided socially. Such social gatherings that do exist aresegregated into 'families' and bachelors', often by simply restricting bachelors to the most unpopular times of day or week. Some of the more enlightened clubs and hotels are free from this practice. Segregation of the sexes is a fact of life and Arabs will defend their opinions on the subject with all the fervour of someone who knows that not everyone agrees with it. Even in relatively liberal and cosmopolitan Kuwait, some are required to wear the veil and many wear the 'obayah'. In court, the testimony of one man is as good as that of two women.The effect of this on Western women is less than in some other Middle Eastern countries since possibly the average Kuwaiti is more tolerant and in any case, he is outnumbered by more liberal expats. It is not so vital for women to cover up legs and arms, although some discretion is needed and one would not venture into the more traditional shopping areas like the souks or into a Co-op clad in shorts (then again neither should men). Conversely, in the hotels and more fashionable suburbs, the range of clothes worn is almost of Western standards. Western women never, however, feel entirely comfortable in the presence of a majority of Arab men as the latter’s upbringing probably gives them some strange notions about women, particularly non-Muslim ones. It is suspected that inside the Arab home, women play a much more dominant role than outside; this gives them a curious advantage in that they are treated to a Westerner’s eyes, with an exaggerated old-world courtesy.Hospitality and generosity are usually deeply ingrained and genuine, and considered high virtues. A person who regularly practices these virtues gains the respect and reputation of not having been negligent in assuming his or her responsibility.Perhaps because of their extensive contact with other cultures while trading and schooling abroad and because of the potentially potent mix of diverse ethnic and religious groups, Kuwaitis have a long tradition of tolerance. Kuwaiti culture and domestic politics are able to accommodate citizens and groups whose ethnic homelands may be rivals. The tolerance extended to these and others, however, must function within the bounds of Arab traditions, Muslim ideals, the security of the entire group, and respect for public honour and face.A feature of the Hejira calendar is the holy month of Ramadan which according to the lunar cycle should run for 28 days. During this period Muslims are required to fast by day, however they make up for this by partying all night, and Ramadan can be thought of as a month of Christmases. The fasting is taken very seriously and in public places, which includes offices, even non-Muslims must abide by Islam which means no eating drinking or smoking (although due to a Sept. 1995 law all public smoking is now illegal) during daylight hours, although for the expat a room is normally set aside for meals, hidden from normal view.Everyone in Kuwait is greeted with a handshake and entering a meeting, you will be expected to greet everyone in the room this way. When attending meetings, or any social gathering, it is considered discourteous to refuse tea (chai) when offered.As Kuwait is an Islamic state, the importation, production and sale of alcohol is prohibited. (But it still happens) and it is considered discourteous to show the soles of one’s feet.

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  • The Old Souk (market)

    by Divingmouse Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: The great shopping in the old souk and the gold markets will amaze you. So many things and just not enough time to see it all in one day. This is a three day adventure. Everything from aluminum cookware to gold, blankets, dishdashas, shoes, perfumes, watches, and more than I can mention.

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