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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Recommended Reading

    by MM212 Updated Feb 20, 2013

    Favorite thing: Below are a few books I recommend reading prior to a trip to Beirut:

    Pity The Nation, by Robert Fisk

    Beyrouth - La Brûlure des Rêves (Éditions Autrements, Collection Monde)

    Histoire du Liban Contemporain 1860-1943 - Denise Ammoun (Fayard)

    Beirut's Memory, by Ayman Trawi (Photo Collection)

    Rome in the East, The Transformation of an Empire, by Warwick Ball

    Les Croisades vues par les Arabes, Amin Maalouf (The Crusades Through Arab Eyes, by Amin Maalouf)

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  • Delia_Madalina's Profile Photo

    Entrance Visas - Take it seriously

    by Delia_Madalina Updated Jan 8, 2010

    Favorite thing: The General Security site offers extenssive information regarding the regulations for each country. As always, call the local embassy for up-to-date requirements for obtaining the visa.

    The citizens of the below countries may obtain a visa at the borders:
    Andorra – Antigua and Barbuda – Argentina – Armenia – Australia – Austria – Azerbaijan – The Bahamas – Barbados – Belarus – Belgium – Belize – Bhutan – Brazil – Bulgaria – Canada – Chile – China Rep – Czech Republic – Costa Rica – Croatia – Cyprus – Denmark – Dominican Republic – Estonia – Finland – France – Great Britain - Georgia – Germany – Greece – Hong Kong – Hungary – Iceland – Ireland – Italy – Japan – Kazakhstan – Kyrgyzstan – Latvia – Lithuania – Liechtenstein – Luxembourg – Macedonia – Macau (S A R) – Malaysia – Malta – Mexico – Moldova – Monaco – Montenegro – Netherlands – New Zealand – Norway – Palau – Panama – Peru – Poland – Portugal – Russia – Romania – Saint Kitts & Nevis – Samoa – San Marino – Serbia– Singapore – Slovakia – Slovenia – South Korea – Spain – Sweden – Switzerland – Tajikistan – Turkey (exclusively at airport) - Turkmenistan – USA – Ukraine – Uzbekistan –Venezuela –Yugoslavia.

    Upon landing, you will be asked to fill up a form with your personal data, as well as with the address and phone number of your accommodation. In December 2010, I was randomly chose for a check up (probably because I'm a young woman, travelling alone) and went through a short interogatory, after which my host was called to confirm my booking.

    As I've read on certain forums that some travelers give inexact or incomplete addresses, I strongly advise you to take this matter seriously, unless you want to be denied the visa.

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  • VISA for damscuss

    by asadadd7 Written Sep 9, 2008

    Favorite thing: Hi Zak

    Thanks for the tip, can you eloborate if i m travelling to damscus & wanted to visit beirut for a short trip will my visa for syria will be valid for re-entry?
    Also as i m travelling in december to damscus & beirut(possible) what are the must see or do things in beirut or nearby?

    Regards

    Asad

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  • maro83's Profile Photo

    Tipping & Time

    by maro83 Written Jan 27, 2006

    Favorite thing: Tipping is usually expected. Most restaurants and nightspots include a 16 % service charge in the bill, but it is customary to leave an extra of 5% to 10% of the total.
    The local Time is two hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time from October to March, and three hours ahead from April To September.

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  • maro83's Profile Photo

    Government & Currency

    by maro83 Written Jan 27, 2006

    Favorite thing: Lebanon is a democratic republic with a parliamentary system of government and a cabinet headed by a prime minister. Its constitution is based on the separation of executive, legislative and judicial powers, elected by 128 members of parliament for a six-year term.
    The latter are elected by a universal adult suffrage every four years, and are allocated seats along religious lines.
    The currency is the Lebanese Lira (LL). Notes are in denominations of LL1,000, LL5,000, LL10,000, LL20,000, LL50,000, AND LL100,000. Coins are in LL50, LL100, LL250 and LL500 pieces.
    US currency is accepted almost everywhere. The exchange rate of the US Dollar is LL 1,500 with occasional minor fluctuation. Foreign currency may be exchanged at any bank or exchange or cambio shops. Credits cards are accepted almost everywhere.

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    Languages

    by maro83 Written Jan 27, 2006

    Favorite thing: The Official Language of Lebanon is Arabic. French is a very popular language, which was widely used during the French Mandate and was then compulsory in schools.
    Over the years, the English has also become more prominent. In general, Lebanese are natural polyglots, bilingual, trilingual and sometimes speaking as many as four languages, which means that the international traveler should find no difficulty whatsoever in communicating with the locals. However, any effort at trying to speak Arabic will be well-rewarded. No matter how far off the mark your pronunciation or grammar might be, you'll often get the response (usually with a big smile), "AH, you speak Arabic very well!"

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  • maro83's Profile Photo

    Population & Religion

    by maro83 Written Jan 27, 2006

    Favorite thing: Since there has not been an official census since 1932, the population of Lebanon is estimated at around 3.5 million at present. It is a startling fact, however, that five times as many people of Lebanese descent live abroad as in their home country.
    There are 18 recognised religious groupings in Lebanon.
    Five predominate: Maronite (Catholic ) Christians, Greek Orthodox Christians; Shi'a Muslims, Sunni Muslims & Druze.

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  • DunaKal's Profile Photo

    My family

    by DunaKal Updated Jul 22, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Last time I visited Lebanon to attend my nephew's wedding..
    There were like 15 members of my family to greet us(my sisters,husband and I)at the airport terminal including the bride and groom ;-)
    This was indeed one my fondest memories of arriving to Lebanon.

    Fondest memory: Funny thing I was chatting with my cousin before we left home to Lebanon and I told him,we have plenty of luggage and I think we should take a taxi as well as his car,,so he says,,"I'm sorry,I'm gonna be busy tomorrow,so I think you should rent a van..."

    I felt sorry,for not single person could come to the airport for us,specially that my eldest sister hadn't visited Lebanon for 20 years,but I said"it's OK,I understand".

    Not to mention everybody was laughing at my surprised face when I saw almost every one was there for us :-D

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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  • sarrahh's Profile Photo

    Akkar

    by sarrahh Written Jun 22, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: (152 km from Beirut) - Castle

    Probably built in the late 10th century A.D. by Mouhriz Ibn Akkar, the castle was taken by the Crusaders in the 12th century and re-conquered in 1271 by the Mamluke Sultan Baibars.

    During the Ottoman period, it belonged to the feudal family of the Banu Sayfa, then around 1620 it was partially destroyed by Emir Fakhreddine II.

    Although the castle is in ruins, you can recognize two courts separated by a sort of ditch and surrounded by five rectangular towers. The higher court contains a vaulted cistern. The main tower at the southern end, which is still in fairly good condition, is decorated with a frieze of lions carved during restoration work carried out by Sultan Baibars. From here there is also a splendid view of the surrounding area.

    Akkar
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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  • sarrahh's Profile Photo

    Do You Want to Cook Lebanese Food ??

    by sarrahh Written Jun 14, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Ingredients:
    Tabbouleh Libanaise 1/4 cup burghul, fine cracked wheat 2 cups finely chopped parsley 1/2 kg (16 oz) firm red tomatoes, washed and finely chopped 1/2 cup finely chopped fresh mint leaves 1/4 cup finely chopped onion 1/2 cup lemon juice 1 teaspoon salt (as desired) 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil .
    How to:
    Wash chopped mint and parsley then drain well. Wash the burghul several times and drain. Soak it in chopped tomatoes for 20 minutes. Rub chopped onion with salt. Mix all ingredients in a bowl. Add olive oil and lemon juice, toss the mixture well. Serve Tabbouleh with crisp lettuce leaves, or fresh cabbage leaves

    Tabboule
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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  • sarrahh's Profile Photo

    Did you Know ?

    by sarrahh Written Jun 12, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: » Lebanon's name has been around for 4,000 years non-stop.
    » Lebanon's name has been mentioned in the Bible 76 times.
    Sidon was mentioned 36 times
    Tyre (Soor) was mentioned 63 times
    » Lebanon is the country that has the most books written about it.
    » Lebanon is one of the most populated in its archeological sites.
    » Lebanon is the only Asian Middle Eastern country that has no desert.
    » Lebanon is the only non-dictatorial country in the Arab world.
    » Byblos is the oldest city in the world.
    » Lebanon has 17 religious Communities.
    » Lebanon has 40 daily newspapers.
    » Lebanon has over 100 banks.
    » 70% of the students are in private schools.
    » There's 1 doctor for every 10 people.
    » There are 15 rivers in Lebanon.
    » Beirut was destroyed and rebuilt 7 times.
    » There are around 3,500,000 Lebanese.
    » There are around 12,000,000 Lebanese abroad (outside Lebanon).
    » The first law school was built in Lebanon.

    ??????
    Related to:
    • Archeology

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  • sarrahh's Profile Photo

    Lebanese night

    by sarrahh Written Apr 25, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Lebanese Night Song: Eliss and Chris Du Burgh
    It was late in a Lebanese restaurant, in the heat of a Lebanese night,
    There was dancing, people were singing, she came in from the garden outside,
    And in her eyes I saw the stars,
    And I felt something happen in my heart;

    Then I knew I was going to meet her in the heat of a Lebanese night,
    And the girl inside the woman, who came over to sit by my side,
    And when she smiled, the whole world stopped,
    It was then I heard the echoes of a child;

    And did you go to your bed with a sweet lullaby,
    And the sound of the guns in the night,
    And did you dance in the fields, did you run for your life,
    From the hell that came down from the sky?
    On a Lebanese night, on a Lebanese night;

    We went down to the edge of the water, by the light of a Lebanese dawn,
    And she told me all the stories of her beautiful land in the war,
    Her tears fell down, the sun came up,
    And I saw again the young girl in her eyes;

    And did you go to your bed with a sweet lullaby,
    And the sound of the guns in the night,
    And did you dance in the fields, did you run for your life,
    From the hell that came down from the sky?
    On a Lebanese night, on a Lebanese night;

    All of my life, all I have known,
    only a place where peace cannot go;
    All over the world, the gift from before,
    nothing is left for the children of war;

    And did you go to your bed with a sweet lullaby,
    And the sound of the guns in the night,
    And did you dance in the fields, did you run for your life,
    From the hell that came down from the sky?
    On a Lebanese night, on a Lebanese night,
    On a Lebanese night, on a Lebanese night,
    I will be waiting, in the Lebanon.

    Fondest memory: it is a song for a lebanese singer calles elissa and chris du burgh download this song and u will like it for sure

    lebanese night
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Music
    • Family Travel

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  • sarrahh's Profile Photo

    FAIROOZ

    by sarrahh Updated Apr 15, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Her voice is silk and flame in one.

    In Lebanon, we sway with it, sail the seas with it as our mast, and because of it we love.

    Our betrothed women ask us to seal them with her voice, to dissolve its whispers into pearls for a necklace, and with its vibrations to encircle their waists; they beg us to pluck love songs for them from this voice alone.

    The fighter among us who finds in her voice the will to survive, hears through it the swish of the sword and experiences his moment of valor.
    so dont miss any festival anyway when she will sing i will tell u b4

    OUR SINGER
    Related to:
    • Music
    • Festivals
    • Arts and Culture

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  • spoutnek's Profile Photo

    Where history embraces modernity

    by spoutnek Written Oct 27, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: It is needless to say that Lebanon is the bridge between the East and the West. It is the oxygen of the Middle East. Lebanese mother toungue is something like that: ''Hi, Kifak, Ca va'' ( hi, how are you doing, fine?)or ''Maitre, il fatoura, please'' Waiter, the bill, please) Three languages in one!!! More and more and more...

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  • dr.firas's Profile Photo

    From Bronze age!

    by dr.firas Written Aug 30, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: On the site of a previous sanctuary dating back to the Bronze and Iron ages as well as to the Hellenistic period, The Roman Temple of Jupiter was built during the 1st c. AD.
    It consists of a cella built on a 12m. High podium, and a courtyard surrounded by a colonnaded portico.

    Baalbeck

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