Local traditions and culture in Lebanon

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  • Local Customs
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Most Viewed Local Customs in Lebanon

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    Fresh Pistachios

    by TomorrowsAngel Written Sep 25, 2005

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    Fresh pistachio nuts are a must to try. You can buy them at roadside stalls and in the fruit and vegetable sections of some supermarkets. You should store them in the refrigerator and then they’ll last around a week.

    fresh pistachio nuts - roadside stall, Harissa
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    Fresh Mountain Tomatoes

    by TomorrowsAngel Written Sep 25, 2005

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    Stop off at a roadside fresh produce stall and buy some Lebanese mountain tomatoes. These are traditionally served cut into thick slices and spread with toom (fresh garlic) and sumac (a reddish tangy spice).

    fresh mountain tomatoes at a Jounieh roadside stal
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    EAT TABBOULE`

    by sarrahh Written May 26, 2005

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    Lebanon's traditional culinary art combined with the abundance of fresh fruits and vegetables make eating out an adventure. Restaurants specializing in Lebanese food are found everywhere and in all of them you will be invited to try the famous hors-d'oeuvres known as mezze. A good mezze has 30 or 40 dishes, but feasts with as many as 100 dishes have been recorded. It's wise to dedicate an entire afternoon to the authentic Lebanese lunch. Some delicacies are always present in a mezze, including the internationally known tabboule salad. You will also find hommos-a chickpea purée with sesame paste and babaganouj -a dip made of roasted eggplant, sesame paste, lemon and garlic.Kibbeh Nayeh - fresh raw lamb pounded with ground wheat and seasoned with onion, mint, pepper and salt is also a favorite.

    The mezze is usually served without cutlery, for the traditional flat round Arab bread is both fork and spoon. This substantial appetizer course is often accompanied by arak but Lebanon also produces some excellent beers and wines that go just as well.

    For the main course one can try farrouj meshwi - chicken broiled over charcoal and served with a garlic sauce, kafta meshwiyye, minced lamb mixed with finely chopped onion and parsley and broiled on skewers over charcoal or shawarma - slices of highly seasoned lamb cooked on a slow revolving spit. Mehshi - vegetables such as small squash, cabbage leaves, grape leaves, and peppers stuffed with chopped meat, rice and pine nuts is another favorite.

    By the seashore you can get excellent grilled fish, while cool riverside restaurants in the mountains often specialize in fresh trout.

    Pastries in Lebanon are flavored with honey, butter, pistachio nuts or almonds

    TABBOULE`
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    Lebanese language and Arabic Language

    by sarrahh Written May 24, 2005

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    Lebanese is one of the most understandable languages among the Arab States*. In the past fifty years, thousands of songs, poems and books, and hundreds of plays and screenplays have been written in Lebanese. The Egyptian language has also been growing in popularity in the past century due to its tremendous media productions in the region.

    Watching and listening to Lebanese entertainment programs and songs have spread the Lebanese language further among audiences from Arab countries*. If you pick a random mix of 10 songs produced in the Arabic states* an average of 4 songs will be in Lebanese, 4 in Egyptian while the rest will be from the rest of the languages. On the other hand, the songs written in Arabic language do not form more than 1% (one percent) of the song production of all of the countries that use Arabic as their official language.

    Arabic is a formal language that is not spoken today in any of the countries that use it as their official language. It is often used for documenting, publishing, formal speeches and some religious rituals. It has merely changed (evolved) since it was spoken in parts of the Arabian Peninsula some 1,500 years ago. Nowadays, there is not a nation in the world with Arabic being its native language. One cannot learn Arabic by living with Lebanese, Egyptian or even Saudi Families; the only way to learn Arabic is to study it. For example, Kuwaiti, Lebanese or Egyptian television stations hardly have 5-10% of their programs in Arabic.

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    kiss three times

    by spoutnek Written Oct 27, 2004

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    If you are in a situation of shaking hands and kissing you should know that in Lebanon they kiss three times instead of two! In general Lebanese people have their customs in everything but they can adapt and understand quickly in case you dont know about their local cusotms.

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    Eating "loz akhdar" is a regional delicacy

    by swings Written Apr 18, 2004

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    Loz akhdar, or fuzzy green almonds, are a delicacy that is only available for a few weeks each spring, say from about mid-March until late April. Watch for the mounds of fuzzy, green (immature) almonds to appear at vegetable stands or on vendor carts on the street, and buy a few to try. Wash them thoroughly, then either sprinkle salt on them or bite off the end and dip the rest of the nut into a mound of salt on your plate.

    Loz akhdar (green almonds)
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    Don't carry your bread in your hands...

    by call_me_rhia Written Jan 30, 2004

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    Don't carry your bread in your hands... carry it on your wrist, as if it were a bracelet. As soon as I saw this piece of bread I fell in love with it: round and with a large hole in the middle - suits even the bigger wrists. It's called ka`ik, it's sold by street vendors about everywhere, it costs very little and... it's delicious!

    bread sellers

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    entrance fees to archaeological areas

    by call_me_rhia Written Jan 30, 2004

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    To visit the archaeological areas, in Lebanon, you always pay the same price. In December 2003 the price was of 6000 Lebanese Pounds, which is roughly 4 US dollars. The only exception I came across was Baalbeck, where the prices are 12000 Lebanese pounds. And it's not too expensive if you consider the fact that you'll be seeing some of the most impressive roman ruins you'll ever come across (Rome included)

    lebanese money

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    Smoking coutry

    by xaver Written Dec 30, 2003

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    Finally!
    Finally a country where you can smoke in airport, bars, restaurants, hotels and taxis.
    Here you do not have to ask if smoking is possible as tables are full of ashtreys!
    awfully not in the flyghts, but it was just a 3 hours and half trip, so I could resist:-)

    arghile

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  • dr.firas's Profile Photo

    Gebran Khalil Gebran!

    by dr.firas Updated Nov 16, 2003

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    Oh now that is one of my hero's and great example!
    the famous Lebanese Philosopher and writer and artist Gebran Khalil Gebran!
    he lived his life in U.S.A and wrote many great books such as:
    The prophet
    Madman
    and other wonderful thoughts and poems!
    he is a real genius which every Middle Eastern citizen and Arab is very proud of!
    I am! :-)

    My Hero

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    The Lebanese National Anthem

    by MalenaN Updated Oct 6, 2003

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    The Lebanese National Anthem was adopted in 1927 and is written by Rachid Nakhlé (lyrics) and Wadih Sabra (music).

    Koullouna Lilouatann Lil'oula Lil'a Lam,
    Milo'ay Nizzaman Sayfouna Oual Kalam,
    Shlouna Oualjabal Manbi Tonn Lirrijal,
    Kaoulouna Oual' Amal Fisa bilil Kamal.
    Koullouna Lilouatann Lil' Oula Lil 'Alam,
    Koullouna Lilouatann.

    Chaykhouna Oualfata Indasaoutil Oua Tann
    Ousdou gha Bin Mata Saouarat Nalfitann
    Charkouna Kalbouhou Aba Dann Loubnane
    Sanahou Rab Bouhou Limadal Azmane.
    Koullouna Lilouatann Lil' Oula Lil 'Alam,
    Koullouna Lilouatann.

    Bahrouhou Barrouhou Dourratouchchar Kain
    Rildouhou Birrouhou Malioul Koutbain
    Ismouhou 'Izzouhou Moun Zou Kanal Joudoude
    Majdouhu Arzouhou Ramzouhou Lilkhouloude
    Koullouna Lilouatann Lil' Oula Lil 'Alam,
    Koullouna Lilouatann.

    All of us! For our Country, for our Flag and Glory!
    Our valour and our writings are the envy of the ages.
    Our mountains and our valleys, they bring forth stalwart men.
    And to Perfection all our efforts we devote.
    All of us! For our Country, for our Flag and Glory!

    Our Elders and our children, they await our Country's call:
    And on the Day of Crisis they are as Lions of the Jungle.
    The heart of our East is ever Lebanon:
    May God preserve her until end of time.
    All of us! For our Country, for our Flag and Glory!

    The Gems of the East are her land and sea.
    Throughout the world her good deeds flow from pole to pole.
    And her name is her glory since time began.
    Immortality's Symbol- the Cedar- is her Pride. All of us! For our Country, for our Flag and Glory!

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    Mercedeses and sheets

    by MalenaN Updated Oct 3, 2003

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    The most common car in Lebanon should be the Mercedes. At least almost all taxises are Mercedes cars. This car is standing on a street in Manara, western Beirut.
    People living in the house behind have put big sheets over the windows for protection from the sun.

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    LOL

    by dr.firas Written Sep 28, 2003

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    Hee hee I told my daddy who was smiling all the time of my no trustable look in my face during the climbing trip to the mountain in the Tele ferric:
    "You can laugh as much as you can, but I believe that a human life is the most value thing he has".
    He laughed and told me that I am right,
    Well I can not do anything with my fear of high places like Plane or Tele ferric, I always argue: "give me a Para shout and I won't be anxious" LOL

    View

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    Poseidon

    by dr.firas Written Sep 28, 2003

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    The statue of the gorgeous Poseidon the God of seas and Oceans is placed between the passages of the 2 parts of Jeitas cave, the upper and lower caves,
    Great place to have a rest and eat something and wait for the small funny train to lead you down to the lower cave from the upper one!
    Tourists like me adore having a great picture with Poseidon.

    Me and Poseidon

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    Sidon

    by dr.firas Written Sep 28, 2003

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    An important seashore city, in the south west coast of Lebanon!
    Over 600,000 of population,
    Sidon has a very beautiful Citadel to be visited,
    And it was in the pages of the art and pictures of many foreign artists during different years of its history, Sidon is really a worth must see activity in Lebanon.

    Sidon

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