Beirut Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by Robin020
  • Local Customs
    by Robin020
  • Local Customs
    by Robin020

Most Recent Local Customs in Beirut

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    1 month visa on arrival free of charge

    by Robin020 Written Dec 1, 2011
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    Visa Issuance for Eu citizens :
    Visa required, except for Nationals of EU traveling

    as tourist can obtain a visa on arrival at Beirut (BEY), for a
    max. stay of 3 months, provided holding confirmed
    return/onward tickets, and a telephone number and address in

    Lebanon. Fee: free of charge for stays up to 1 month and
    between LBP 50,000.- and LBP 100,000.- for stays up to 3
    months.

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    Language time

    by Robin020 Written Dec 1, 2011

    Hello : Marhaba
    How are you? : kifak
    I am good : mashi al hal,
    How much :kam
    Please : min fadlik
    You are welcome: Afwan
    far: baa id
    Near : arib
    beautiful : jamil
    Money : masari
    Why : lesh
    Where are you from:min wen inta
    I am from America,Holland: ana min America,Hollanda

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    Mate (mati) drink

    by Robin020 Updated Nov 29, 2011

    Mate in Arabic (mati)is south American drink but very popular drink in Lebanon,
    Is drunk with Massasa (strow )and hot water.
    Those who share the mate join in a kind of bond of total acceptance and friendship.

    some of the benefits of drinking yerba mate tea.
    1. Rich in Antioxidants

    Yerba mate tea is very high in antioxidants; it's got about 90% more antioxidants than green tea. Yerba mate has significant immune boosting properties. It can slow the signs of aging, detoxify the blood and prevent many types of cancer. Yerba mate also helps reduce stress and insomnia.
    2. Enhances Your Ability to Focus

    Proponents of yerba mate tea say that the minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, animo acids and polphenols found in this beverage have a balancing effect on the caffeine it contains. Users report increased mental energy, clarity and focus, but they also say that yerba mate doesn't cause any of the uncomfortable side effects associated with drinking caffeinated beverages, such as headaches, stomachaches and jitters.
    3. Enhances Physical Endurance

    The chemical compounds and nutrients in yerba mate tea affect your metabolism to make your body use carbohydrates more efficiently. This means you'll get more energy from the food you eat. You'll also burn more of the calories your body has stored in fat cells as fuel when you drink yerba mate tea regularly. Regular yerba mate consumption also helps keep lactic acid from building up in your muscles so you can decrease post workout soreness and cut your recovery time.
    4. Aids Digestion

    The native peoples of South America have long used yerba mate tea as a traditional herbal remedy against digestive ailments. Yerba mate aids digestion by stimulating increased production of bile and other gastric acids. Yerba mate helps keep your colon clean for effective and efficient waste elimination, and helps reduce the stomach bacteria that can contribute to bad breath.
    5. Helps You Control Your Weight

    Native South American peoples have traditionally used yerba mate as part of a lifestyle that includes a healthy diet and exercise. Yerba mate has stimulant qualities to help you feel full sooner after you begin eating, and it slows your digestion so that your stomach stays full longer. Combining yerba mate with a healthy diet and regular exercise can help boost your metabolism to burn more calories, and it can help you eat less by curbing your appetite slightly.
    6. Supports Cardiovascular Health

    The antioxidants and amino acids present in yerba mate help fat and cholesterol move through your bloodstream so that they don't accumulate on artery walls. Yerba mate also helps prevent arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and prevents blood clots that may cause heart attack or stroke

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    Have an Almaza

    by Delia_Madalina Updated Jun 13, 2011

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    Lebanese people are very patriotic and take each chance to promote their local products. This is why, you can't leave Lebanon without enjoying at least a glass of their Almaza beer.

    Just to prove the above, read the joke below, very famous among Lebanese:

    "4 leaders of big beer companies meet for a drink. The president of Budweiser orders a Bud. Miller's president orders a Millers and the president of Heineken orders a Coors. When it is Almaza's president's turn to order, he orders a soda. Why didn't you order Almaza everyone asks? Nah, he replies. If you guys aren't having a beer, neither will I."

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    Lebanese visas

    by MrBill Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    neo-Ottoman clocktower

    Travelers wishing to enter Lebanon must possess a valid passport with a visa obtained beforehand from a Lebanese embassy or consulate abroad. However, many visitors from other Arab states, the USA, and from Western Europe can buy their visas upon arrival at the international airport in Beirut. If you are arriving by boat, the ship will make the necessary registration on your behalf. When we landed in Beirut on a recent cruise, the ship kept our passports, and we were given a photocopy with copy of the visa attached. But, when we left, we got our passports back with no Lebanese stamp to say we had either entered or left the country. It was very strange. However, if you have an Israeli stamp in your passport you will be denied a visa, as the two countries are still technically at war with one another. If you plan to visit Isreal and Lebanon, have the Israeli authorities stamp a piece of paper to carry in your passport, instead of your passport itself. Or you can visit other Arab countries first, and then visit Isreal, if you do not intend to return.

    Related to:
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    • Cruise
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    Reconstruction

    by mikey_e Written Jan 16, 2011
    Bombed out building by Sahet ash-Shuhada
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    You don't rebuild an entire country after 25 years of civil war in a week. In particular, you don't do it when the next twenty years are frought with civil strife, political crises, unresolved refugee issues and foreign invasions and occupations. This is all to say that no visitor Beirut or Lebanon as a whole should expect not to find scars of the past or blatant examples of the destruction brought about by the conflict that engulfed this small nation for two and a half decades. A huge amount of money has been invest in rebuilding the country, large portions of which have come from wealthy Lebanese investors who made their money in the West or the Gulf. Investors also play political games, so money has come from the US, France, the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Iran at various times as a means of buoying specific factions. The result is a motley spectacle of development and reconstruction, from the decrepit refugee camps of Sabra and Shtila to the gleaming office towers and shopping malls around Sahet an-Nejmeh. In Beirut, sometimes the best models for your photographs are the buildings that surround you and the voids that remain after the war.

    Related to:
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    • Architecture

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    Destroying Heritage

    by MM212 Updated Feb 9, 2010

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    Graffiti in Achrafieh - Dec 2009
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    Known for its beautiful mansions with red tiled roofs and Gothic windows, Beirut has seen many of them disappear over the years to make way for new developments. Such is the story all over the world, but Beirut's case is more pronounced because it had a civil war. Though many of the remaining Beiruti mansions have since been restored, a greater number is now once again being destroyed. This is in large part because of the hot property boom in recent years in the city, where wealthy Gulf citizens and Lebanese expatriates are willing to spend millions for large apartments with views. The result is that sought-after neighbourhoods, such as Achrafieh, are seeing their mansions vanish at an accelerating rate in favour of high tower blocks. Not only is this a great loss for the city architecturally, but also in terms of its gardens, skyline, sea breeze and general aesthetics; the city's tiny streets are being suffocated. I came across the attached graffiti on the walls of an Achrafieh mansion about to be destroyed. Clearly, awareness is there, but not the laws or will by developers to preserve the old. The attached photos also show views over Achrafieh in June 2006, compared with Dec 2009 with all the modern new towers.

    The travelogue: "Traditional Beiruti Architecture" shows some examples of the city's heritage.

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    Together!

    by MM212 Updated Feb 8, 2010

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    Together - March 2005

    On my first visit to Lebanon in March 2005, I had the opportunity to see the country during interesting times. Demonstrations were being held at Place des Martyrs on a daily basis in which people demanded "the truth" about the assassination of Rafic Hariri a month earlier. It was wonderful to see the Lebanese fully (or mostly?) united for the first time in decades, regardless of religion or sect (see attached photo)! At the time, Lebanon was still under the control of Syria, which was allegedly blamed - justly or not? - for the assassination of Hariri. The demonstrations ultimately led to the withdrawal of Syrian troops from Lebanon, and although everyone rejoiced, the untold reality is that the Syrian presence had helped to maintain a certain stability and a controlled peace in the country. Unfortunately, Lebanon then slowly slipped into instability which culminated in 2006 with a full on Israeli invasion, followed by a political crisis which only began to be resolved at the end of 2008. Although some tensions remain, the situation is now fortunately very peaceful (as of early 2010) and inshallah (as the Lebanese say) it will continue.

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    The Legend of Saint George

    by MM212 Updated Feb 7, 2010

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    Saint George at Place de l'Etoile - June 06

    One of the most important saints in eastern churches, Saint George, the dragon slayer, also happens to be the patron saint of Beirut. Here and in churches around the world, he is always depicted riding a horse and fighting the dragon, which according to one local legend, occurred right here in Beirut (was it at the Bay of Saint George?). Saint George's Day is celebrated in churches on the 23rd April, both in the Middle East and in Europe, where his legend was brought back by the Crusaders. Born in Palestine, the saint is said to have been martyred around 300 AD during the time of Emperor Diocletian. His importance to the region, and to Beirut in particular, explains why there are so many churches dedicated to him in Beirut. A large mosaic depicting his fight is also proudly displayed at Place de l'Etoile next to the Greek Orthodox Cathedral of Saint George.

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    Solidere

    by iwys Updated Mar 28, 2007

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    Solidere is the name of the urban renewal project for the reconstruction of Downtown Beirut or BCD, following the destruction inflicted by the Civil War. Solidere, which was founded in 1994, is an acronym for Societe Libanese pur le Developpement et la Reconstruction du Centre-Ville de Beyrouth - you can see why it needs an acronym.

    They seem to be doing a great job. I was really impressed by the elegant new buildings in and around Place d'Etoile.

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    Lebanese Food: Man'ouche

    by miso80 Written Nov 16, 2006

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    manouche zaatar
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    Zaatar (Thyme & sesame seeds), Gibnee (Cheese - Halloumi or Mozarella), Vegetables or a mix...The manouche, mankouche or manqouche is the Lebanese pizza!!

    The dough is made up of flour, yeast, sugar..and it can be topped with:
    - thym, sesame seeds and olive oil
    - Cheese (according to choice)
    - Cocktail (which is usually a mix of cheese & zaatar (half of the rounded piece of dough has cheese, the other has zaatar, when it is folded in half, you get a taste of both!
    - Vegetables (this is less common)
    - Kishek ( a form of dried yoghurt that is mixed with onions and other ingredients) ..i know it sounds weird, but some people simply LOVE it..and there are others who don't..so ;)
    - meat (but this has a different name..it is called lahm bi ajeen = meat and bread.

    Although the ingredients are quite simple..believe me the taste is delicious!! I have so many non-lebanese friends who have fallen in love with it, that they've tried to find bakeries in their countries that make it..and others who've tried to make it at home. BUT..believe me, if you're in lebanon, try it..and you're realise, not everyone can make it the same way ;)

    See my Restaurant tip on Faysal's and Pizza Hiba

    I've listed a website below that has recipes for manoushes and pictures of different manoushes so you can have a clearer idea of what it is, and how its made!

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    All about the Argileh or Shisha!

    by miso80 Written Jul 5, 2006

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    There are so many different names for this unique smoking device. Some call it a argileh, nargileh, hookah, water-pipe, shisha, etc. The Argileh (NARGILE as it is known in the Middle East) has been the standard of smoking for centuries in the middle east and originated in Turkey over 500 years ago. HUBBLY BUBBLY smoking is quite common at restaurants and cafes all across the middle east.

    This unique smoking experience is rapidly growing in popularity all over the world. Many people love the smooth, flavorful, and cool taste of the smoke. The Shisha) pipes filter the flavored smoke with cool water making each puff oh so sweet!!

    Tobacco mixed with fruit molasses and honey is used when smoking out of a shisha. Other names for this include: tabac, tombak, tumbak, gouza, guza, moassel etc. Specifically, the tobacco is a grounded up mixture of dried fruit pulp, flavored molasses, and fresh tobacco leaves. My personal favourite is called 'Two Applies', and is made up of the dried pulp of red and green apples. The tobacco comes in a variety of flavors including apple, apricot, strawberry, mixed fruit, mint, cherry, grape, and the list just goes on and on.

    Nargileh's are usually lavishly decorated and can make for a great conversation piece in your home. And it makes for a delightful experience.

    Although all smoking is bad for your health, and you should avoid becoming addicted to it but I think it should be an interesting experience to try one :o)

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    Queen

    by themagiclake Written May 1, 2006

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    Queen of Beirut

    The Queen with no doubts...
    Waiting near the seashore, and it is a beautiful way to celebrate being in Lebanon, next time I promise you baby, we will have ride, and we will do the titanic scene hehe!!!

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    Balloon

    by themagiclake Written May 1, 2006

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    Fly high

    Another sign, we have signs everyday, we know we are doomed to have signs every single day, we never stopped to have since the first day we knew each other, and we are sure to have till the last day of our life, nice balloon, and nice Lebanese flag on it!

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    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    Beauty...and...

    by themagiclake Written May 1, 2006

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    Halla Hakbar

    In the hotel, you used to notice and listen to the adan...
    5 times in the day, they call for pray...
    ah and the bells of the church at 5.00 pm also every day...
    this splendid mosque was next to a church, you came and saw with your own eyes, what is the real tolerance, and respect in the brotherhood of humans, Halla Hakbar you said...
    Allahoo Akbar.. yes... and the Mouaden was saying it five time, in a great voice, but it seemed to be sad...you remember baby, it was really sad voice...!!!!
    I wonder why?

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Beirut Local Customs

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