Fun things to do in Beirut

  • labneh & pickles - Sep 2010
    labneh & pickles - Sep 2010
    by MM212
  • Al Omari Mosque
    by zuyao
  • Roman Ruins
    Roman Ruins
    by zuyao

Most Viewed Things to Do in Beirut

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    Pigeon Rocks

    by zuyao Written May 19, 2012

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    Located just off the western end of the Corniche are several natural rock structures/ arch known as Pigeon Rocks. You can also take a boat ride around the rock formations and apparently through some caves.

    Pigeon Rocks

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    Reminder of War

    by zuyao Written May 19, 2012

    Perhaps one of the most iconic building in Beirut - Holiday Inn (or what is left of it) is a bitter memory of the craziness that happened during the civil war. It used to be the tallest building in town and was a favorite position for snipers owing to its good vantage point. Heavily bombed and destroyed, the building is still standing and apparently structurally sound.

    However, it has been left uninhabited and amidst the revitalized city, it stands a reminder of what have happened in Beirut.

    Stark reminder of the past

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    Place d'Etoile

    by zuyao Written May 19, 2012

    This is where the famous Green Line used to run along during the disastrous years of the Civil War. Since rebuilt and reconstructed, the place features cafes and restaurants lined up along the streets which are off-limits to vehicles. At the center of it all is the clock tower. The parliament is also located just opposite the clock tower.

    Clock Tower

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    Eglise Saint-Maron (Mar Maroun)

    by MM212 Updated Apr 7, 2012

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    Dedicated to the founder of the Maronite sect, Église Saint-Maron (Knisset Mar Maroun in Arabic), lies at the edge Gemmeyzé and Saifi Village. It was likely built in the late 19th century using the traditional stone architecture of the area. The beautiful interior, with its use of ablaq (i.e. bi-coloured) arches, is reminiscent of Moorish and Pisan architecture. A rather impressive crystal chandelier illuminates the centre of the nave.

    Eglise St Maron Nave & Chandelier (June 06) Eglise Saint Maron - June 06 Eglise St Maron exterior - June 06 Double bell towers of St Maroun (Sep 2010)
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    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Saifi village

    by Robin020 Written Feb 13, 2012

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    Saifi Village

    Saifi Village - commonly referred to as Le Quartier des Arts, due to its numerous art galleries, antique stores, artisan shops, and specialty boutiques - is an upscale, residential neighborhood in Beirut. Saifi Village is located at the southeastern periphery of centre ville. ].

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  • Towers of Beirut

    by Robin020 Written Feb 13, 2012

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    ) Marina Towers

    Marina Towers is a residential complex near the Beirut Marina desighned by firm Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, Marina Towers is built on over 7,000 sq meters of land with the main tower reaching a height of 150 meters, making it the second tallest in lebanon.

    Beirut Tower
    ) Beirut Tower
    Beirut Tower is located in Solidere and was completed in 2009. The skyscraper has a height of 112.17 meters with thirty floors.

    Platinum Tower
    Platinum Tower is the tallest building in Beirut at the moment. It stands 152.5 meters tall, with 34 floors. It was completed in 2008. is also known as the sculpture of light
    5) Hosn 440 Tower
    Hosn 440 Tower is located in Mina el Hosn, Beirut, and is one of the tallest skyscrapers in the city, rising 142 meters above the sea level.

    6) Al Mur Tower
    Al Mur Tower is about 100 meters tall.

    7) Sursock Tower
    Sursock Tower is located in Ashrafiyeh, Beirut. It has 18 floors and is 90 meters tall.

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  • The Gibran Khalil Gibran Garden

    by Robin020 Written Feb 13, 2012

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    The Gibran Khalil Gibran Garden is about 5,000-square-meter public garden in the Centre Ville area of Beirut The garden is named in honor of the Lebanese–American poet and philosopher Khalil Gibran, features two circular lawns, a fountain, and some modern sculptures, including the statue of Gibran himself. in popular place to sit in summers under the trees.

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    People watch in the Place D'Etoile

    by scanos Written Jan 15, 2012

    This square beside the parliament building attracts locals and tourists, many from the Gulf. It is fascinating to watch the mixture of conservative and cosmopolitan in the cafes and just walking around. As ever, everyone in Lebanon is incredibly friendly and more than willing to provide any type of assistance. You will probably be understood in English but if not, use whatever French you have.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Archeology

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    La Guava - Have fun by the sea!

    by Delia_Madalina Updated May 24, 2011

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    What Lebanon and, in particular, the surroundings of Beirut don't come short of are resorts for a relaxing day (or more) by the sea!

    We chose La Guava as it was our friends' recommendation. Popular both among ex-pats and locals, La Guava is situated in Rmeileh, on the road from Beirut to Saida - approximately 20 minutes away from the capital. The location has two pools: one of 1,5 -2 m deep for adults and a small one for children, ideally placed to keep an eye on them.

    This location is very entertaining: there was a tae bo and aerobics class on the grass, and a small party for electronic music fans, a few steps away, on the beach, without bothering us. There are also water sports facilities for the passionate ones.

    Related to:
    • Water Sports
    • Windsurfing
    • Beaches

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  • Chateau Musar - winery

    by NatassaPL Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Chateau Musar is a very nice winery, close to Jounieh.
    Created in 1930 in the cellar of an old XVIIIth century castle, Château Musar is as much the work of a family as the living testimony of all the civilizations that tread its soil.
    After a long stay in France, Gaston Hochar returned to Lebanon and created Château Musar in the cellars of the old 'Mzar' castle in Ghazir, overlooking the Mediterranean sea.
    What began as a hobby soon became a passion; a passion inspired by an initial encounter with renowned viticulturist Ronald Barton while stationed in Lebanon during the Second World War.
    The family's love for wine grew and in 1959, after completing his oenology diploma in Bordeaux, the eldest son, Serge, entered the business.
    Some call him the magician, the man behind this extraordinary wine. His response? That all he seeks is to translate what nature intended.
    Serge's younger brother Ronald, named after the late Barton, took over Château Musar's marketing and finance departments in 1962.
    There is also the chance for a wine-tasting.

    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting

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  • National Archaological Musuem

    by mano0ola Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Leabanon's national musuem finally re-opened after 2 years of refurbishing in 1997. During the war , musuem authorities took every conceivable precaution to protect priceless collection spanning 6000 years of history .The musuem consistes of 3 floors, the basement , the ground floor and the upper floor, which comprised the heritage of seven thousand years . I am not a big museum fan , but i enjoyed visiting it because this museum is filled with many amazing collection of drawings , wall paintings,bronze containers , mosaic sacrophagi and statues dating back to Greek , Roman and Byzantine times. Also you would see the Ahiran's sarcophagus which is one of the most important archaeological finds in the world ( Ahiran is the king of Byblos ).

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    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

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    Les Souks de Beirut

    by mikey_e Updated Jan 16, 2011

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    Les Souks de Beirut are not the standard oriental marketplace that you might expect. In fact, the entire experience is probably an allegory for all of Lebanon. The name evokes fragrant spices and hawkers selling everything imaginable, but the truth is that this is a high-end mall, with every imaginable luxury goods store that Europe has to offer. You will find every high-end designer label here, and Lebanese going crazy purchasing all that they desire. The mall itself is quite nice and is partially open air, with several cafés and restaurants to feed those who might get a bit tired while spending their hard-earned money.

    Herm��s A sculpture in the Souks More of the luxury stores The square behind the souks Northern entrance to the souk
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    • Luxury Travel

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    Le Serail

    by mikey_e Updated Jan 6, 2011

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    The Grand Serail is the headquarters of government in Lebanon, i.e. the Prime Minister's Palace. For this reason, it is actually illegal to photograph the structure, and if you try to do so from below (the area that is being redeveloped into a posh residential area), soldiers will come up to you and ask you kind, and with their automatic weapons slung at their sides, to refrain from photographing. Suprisingly, the concept of the Serail has come down from the Ottomans, rather than the French, as a saray is a palace. The structure was built up over the years, having been used as barracks by the Egyptians in the 1830s, then as a Garrison and, later, as a hospital by the Ottomans. The building was abandoned as a hospital and became a type of art gallery, before being used as the Governor's House by the French when they took control of Lebanon in 1918. After independence, the Serail was the Presidential Palace from 1943 to 1952 (currently the Presidential Palace is Qantari Palace), and it was finally converted into the Prime Minister's Residence in 1952 by Riad As-Solh. The building was completed in an Ottoman style known as the new order, which is slightly more austere than some Ottoman designs, but is still quite beautiful. The building was damaged during the Civil War, but Lebanon's assassinated President Rafiq Hariri invested a large amount of his personal funds into the restoration of the building after the cessation of hostilities.

    The Serail from below A view of the Serail in the distance A bad picture of Mike in front of the Serail
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    American University of Beirut

    by mikey_e Updated Jan 6, 2011

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    American University of Beirut is perhaps the most impressive university or institution of higher learning that I have seen in the Middle East (I have yet to be to Al-Azhar). The campus of this University is massive and spectacularly lush. The administration of the University has been quite successful in ensuring that the full American campus experience can be enjoyed by students. It extends down from the upper areas of Hamra to the beach (where AUB has its own private beach), with the decline beautifully sculpted and covered gardens and trees to shelter the area from the noise and pollution of the city. The buildings are an interesting mix of the standard neo-Gothic designs of places such as Harvard and a neo-Moorish influence that is undoubtedly a nod towards the local architecture. There are also a massive track and football field, both of which are found on the lower level of the campus. Security at AUB is tight, and you shouldn’t expect that you will be able to wander around at will. It was a bit of a negotiation for me to get into the campus, as I need to present various IDs until one worked. For some reason, my Spanish ID card did the trick, but my Saudi diplomatic ID wasn’t good enough.

    Entrance to AUB The main hall at AUB A view of the football field A glimpse of the greenery A view of the football field
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    Martyrs' Square

    by mikey_e Written Jan 6, 2011

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    Martyrs’ Square is not really a huge draw. It has been a bit neglected during the rejuvenation of the city, to the benefit of Sahet an-Nejmeh. Today, the square is a large open space that is bounded, in a few areas, by large construction sites. The centre holds a monument to the Martyrs of the Civil War, when the country was wracked by sectarian fighting and external interference. The statue, which is of a young man and woman reaching for the sky, provides a good backdrop for pictures. Unfortunately, there’s not much else to attract visitors to the square, as its thunder has been stolen by the nearby Rafiq Hariri Mosque and tomb.

    Martyrs' Square A view from a distance The less glamorous view of the Square
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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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