Tripoli Off The Beaten Path

  • the perforated dome of the hammam
    the perforated dome of the hammam
    by call_me_rhia
  • Tower of Babel
    Tower of Babel
    by sachara
  • interior restaurant
    interior restaurant
    by sachara

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Tripoli

  • Cham's Profile Photo

    Walk the streets of Tripoli

    by Cham Written Jun 9, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tripoli's center is very built up

    When looking from the castle walls (see castle tip for picture) it gives you some idea how built up it is.

    However this isn't always a bad thing... you can get yourself lost in the city very easily... yes ok that sounds like a bad thing but for me getting lost on holiday is good thing because you'll see many things that you don't usually see. Tripoli is a maze of tiny streets sometimes so built up you can't see the sky.

    It has it's own certain charm though. People come to my country to see small villages and communities... and i guess in a way the charm of this is similar. it's like going back in time somewhat, unlike beirut which has a very modern feel to it.

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  • Burj es-Sabaa

    by RblWthACoz Written Mar 24, 2006

    The Lion Tower is the only archaelogical site to see in the New City area. Originally there were decorations of lions lining the facade, but they are no longer there. Built at the end of the 1400's, it's a fairly interesting structure to see, but is not really near anything at all. I had to walk down the road to see it. Normally I think it is open for viewing, but when I stopped by it was closed. I'm not sure if this is because of the season I came in or the time (4 pm).

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    Hammam Al-Nouri

    by call_me_rhia Written Jan 5, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the perforated dome of the hammam

    The Hammam Al-Nouri is the real jewel of Tripoli: an unexpected jewel well hidden by shop fronts just opposite the Madrassah Al-Nouriyah. It was built around 1333 by the Mamluk governor Nur El-Din, and it houses a dressing room, a tepidarium, private bathing "rooms" (ma qsoura) and a huge hot water steam hall. What's great about this abandoned hammam are the materials used - multicolored marble - and the bright decorations of the walls and ceilings. When inside look up towards the vaulted roof, and see how the domes are perforated: you'll have the feeling of a million diamonds floating above your head.

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Tower of Babel, phantasy of a dentist

    by sachara Updated Oct 14, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tower of Babel

    In the restaurant of the Tower of Babel they eaxplained us, that all we saw, was the phantasy and creation of a Lebanese dentist. This dentist had the intention to bring peace after the war by connecting the different religions.
    Everywhere around we saw a lot of mottos and proverbs about peace, environment and beauty, mostly in nice mosaic.

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Tower of Babel

    by sachara Updated Oct 14, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    interior restaurant

    From Tripoli and Anfe we headed to the east for a visit to the Kadisha Valley. First we saw Roman graves in the rocky cliffs along the road and then something very peculiar, so we stopped for a visit.
    It was called the "Tower of Babel". We saw a lot of follies, phantasy buildings, playing grounds, aquarium, fountain and a new phantasy restaurant.
    When we visited in 1995 the restaurant was not finished yet, but will be within a year.
    I think you will not have time to eat or will be very distracted, so many odd and peculiar things are everywhre around.

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Ain Aakrine

    by sachara Updated Oct 14, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ain Aakrine

    South east of Tripoli between Zgharta and Ehden you can make a detour of 10 KM to the hill, Ain Aakrine or Qasr Naous.
    On the top of the hill are two Roman temples, known as Qasr Naous. The western one is still in a rather good state.
    From this site, hardly visited, you have a splendid view to the north west to Tripoli and Zgharta and to the south to the area around Batroun.
    They told us that this hill was a hiding place for Palestinians during the war.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Al-Mina, the port, is worth...

    by maykal Written Aug 29, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Al-Mina, the port, is worth the effort of getting there. OK, so there isn't much to see, but it is a pleasant walk along the seafront, and there are a couple of rocky outcrops linked to the mainland by bridges...great places to write postcards while eating bizr. The promenade was a popular place for walking, jogging and even rollerblading, and there are several cafes on the seafront too.

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Tripoli Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Tripoli off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Tripoli sightseeing.

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