Tripoli Travel Guide

  • View of the clock from Al Manshieh Park
    View of the clock from Al Manshieh Park
    by mikey_e
  • In the old souq area
    In the old souq area
    by mikey_e
  • Central square
    Central square
    by mikey_e

Tripoli Things to Do

  • Mina Souq

    The Mina, or Port, is part of old Tripoli and its economic importance. Today, the port facility has garnered a bit of a bad reputation (it is a port through which weapons are all too frequently smuggled towards Syria) and it does not have sort of bustling atmosphere that is associated with other waterfront souqs. Nevertheless, it is part of the...

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  • Al Manshieh Park

    This park, in the centre of the city and across from the Ottoman Clock Tower, is a popular gathering spot for the residents of the city. It is flanked by benches and ambulant vendors selling coffee, drinks and snacks. It's not uncommon to see groups of men standing around gossiping and talking (given the current situation, probably about politics)....

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  • The Clock Tower

    The Clock Tower is one of Tripoli's most popular attractions. It is a tribute to the city's importance in the Ottoman world, as it was constructed in 1906 in order to mark 30 years of Sultan Abdulhamid II's reign, and as were similar constructions in other cities throughout the Ottoan Empire. In the 1990s, it was restored after the end of the Civil...

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  • The Great Mosque of Al Mansouri

    Located in the heart of the Old City, the multi-domed Great Mosque of Tripoli was built in 1294 AD. It was commissioned by the Mamluke ruler al-Mansour Qalawun soon after he liberated the city from Crusader hands. The location chosen for the mosque had been the site of the Crusader Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Tower (Cathédrale...

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  • Buy traditional sweets from Hallab & Son

    Abdul Rahman Hallab and Son are famous in Lebanon for making traditional sweets since 1881 that are very tasty indeed. The business originated in Tripoli but has several branches in Lebanon and they even have a shop at Beirut Airport.I visited the El Mina Road branch, Tripoli where you can see the sweets being made. There is a restaurant on site...

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  • Khan Al Saboun - Soap Souq

    As you wander through the souqs in Tripoli with their wide array of fish. meat, vegetables, fabrics, clothes and homewares to name but a few wares, you will come across the Soap Souq next to the gold souq. Here you will find several small shops still selling soap made in the traditional way, such as balls of many different colours and fragrances as...

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Tripoli Hotels

Tripoli Restaurants

  • The oh so famous sweets of Tripoli

    Tripoli is very well known for it's sweets and Rafaat Hallab & Sons is the best place to experience them. With multiple locations - the one nearest Tell Square the easiest to find - you'd be selling yourself short if you did not try it out. Grab some coffee or tea and pick something.Menus are in English and Arabic. something, something...

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  • if you fancy Chinese food while in...

    Chopsticks Restaurants were founded in 1998 and the company has several branches in Lebanon, offering tasty Chinese food at reasonable prices. There's the usual array of starters such as spring rolls, won-tons and dumplings as well as soups and salads from LL3 250-11 750, rice, noodles and vegetables from LL 2 750-10 750, mains such as sizzlers,...

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  • Shawarma on Rue Tell

    Rue Tell, the major thoroughfare that passes by the Ottoman Clock Tower, has numerous small local eateries that sell shawarma and falafel sandwiches. This is definitely the place to go for lunch to sample a Tripolitan-style sandwich.

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  • Tripoli Sweets

    Rafaat Hallab & Sons is the best place to eat Tripoli's famous Arab sweets, which are actually small cakes, not candy. They are perhaps most famous for their baklava and maamoul. They started making sweets in 1881 and now export them worldwide. The interior is bright and modern.You can buy a mixed assortment to eat on the premises or you can buy a...

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  • traditional

    Cafe Fahim is a traditional coffee/teahouse, where local men gather to smoke hubbly-bubbly and play backgammon. I had a coffee here and it was excellent.

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  • All I had was juice, but the name sucked...

    I only had orange juice here. The name of the place made me laugh because of the Hooters restaurants in the United States. This one of course is in no way similar to the American version.The chef was very talkative with me. He read the whole menu to me in order to practice his English.

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Tripoli Nightlife

  • Slowly I Walked...

    Slowly, I walked back to my hotel.Passing the old souqs along theway & almost they were shutting down. It was around 8 or 9 pm.It's nice seeing the scene when it's always busy during the day but at night, it's almost quiet...

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  • Around Tell Square...

    In Tell Square, even shops are opened late for late shoppers.I walked pass of them all not buying anything, talking with some people. Mostly about me & my country...& of course about Malaysia's last Prime Minister Dr. Mahathir Mohamed; All of them he's a good man !I said back, "Well, I'm a good man too !"...

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  • I Was Kinda Hungry !

    I was kinda hungry so i had to buy the schwarmas ! I love it ! I love the beef in it...not so much the chicken though.In Baalbek (please click), I had my schwarma with mutton but I somehow couldn't find it around the north of Lebanon...Wonder why ?The photo is showing where I bought my schawarma in Tripoli...

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Tripoli Transportation

  • Take A Tour

    If you're staying in beirut and it's too much hassle for you to take a taxi or a service taxi to the city then book yourself a tour with either wild discovery or nakhal, it'll only cost you around $50 and you get taken to all the major sites plus entry to the castle is included as well as lunch on the highway to tripoli in a lovely seafront...

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  • Going and coming

    Both times I went to Trablous I went from Charles Helou Station in Beirut. There are both smaller buses and bigger buses with air-condition. The bus ride takes about 1,5 hours and the price , when I went, was1000 LL (in June 2002) and 1500 LL (in August 2002).To go to Bcharré, minibusses are leaving Trablous from Abdel Hamid Karani Square (near the...

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  • Getting to Tripoli from Beirut, and back

    The most expensive way to get from Tripoli to Beirut, or viceversa, is by private taxi: it costs about 30 dollars. The least expensive is by bus: less than 1 dollar (to be precise 1000 Lebanese pounds). Buses leave regularily between the two cities: in Beirut from Charles Helou station, in Tripoli from the CLock Tower square. I still have the...

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Tripoli Shopping

  • Prices in arabic

    Many of the prices in Tripoli unlike Beirut will be in Lebanese Lira, although they do take US dollars as well. The prices here are more likely to be displayed in the Hindu numerical form (what we would consider as arabic numbers), the arabic numeral system is actually the system that we use and think of as the Latin system. So i might be handy to...

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  • Fragrances abound

    Beautifully set up, this shop has an extremely wide variety of spices and more that you might want to take home with you in order to make all that local food you've had on your trip. Beyond the spices they also sell perfumes. I found the staff very helpful, though not heavy on the English speaking. spices and perfumes not a lot really

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  • A little bit of everything...

    Located just a little bit north of the Al-Burtasiya Mosque, Souq Al-Haraj is thought to have been built on the site of a Crusader church. As far as merchandise, this souq contains a little of everything and seems more for the locals looking for everyday items.

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Tripoli Local Customs

  • Soap from Tripoly (Trablous)

    The family of Hassun are from the few families in Tripoli, which maintained the soap until today and took Khan to a soap. Working in the Khan Badr Hassun and his nine children, to preserve the legacy of the family. Khan soap teeming tourist and visitors. All that the proportion of Europeans and foreign tourists, up 80% and take soap Traboulsi gifts...

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  • entrance fees

    To visit the Citadel you need to buy a ticket from the office right at the entrance of the fortress. In December 2003 the price was of 6000 Lebanese Pounds, which is roughly 4 US dollars. If you don't have a map of the fortress, it's worth to buy one.

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  • Tripoli Hotels

    1 Hotels in Tripoli

    1 Reviews

Tripoli Warnings and Dangers

  • Safety of historical sites for children

    One of the best things about lebanon and especially the castle in Tripoli is the lack of red tape concerning places you can go in historical sites. The only problem is with this freedom is that most of the ruins in the country have been left pretty much as they are. On some parts there are railings but on top of the castle walls for instance there...

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  • Appropriate Clothing

    Tripoli is predominately made up of Muslims, so women should cover their legs with long trousers/skirt and not bear their shoulders. Guys shouldn't wear shorts which are too short.

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  • If you are heading for Syria,...

    If you are heading for Syria, make sure you have a visa before arriving in Lebanon, as there is no Syrian Embassy in Beirut and Syrian visas can't be obtained on the border.

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Tripoli Tourist Traps

  • Cham's Profile Photo

    by Cham Written Apr 6, 2006

    If there's one thing you should know about the Lebanese is that they're very good business people.

    The first price you get in the souks for things like saffron etc aren't the price that many people pay for them so haggle a little...

    Unique Suggestions: However dont' get too into it. Yeah ok you might be paying a little more than other people, but the chances are you'll be getting it for a better price than at home, so instead of haggling with them too far, just remember that by buying something that maybe $5 more expensive than you know you can get it for, that $5 will mean a lot to some of these people. you have your cheaper goods, they make a nice profit, everyone wins...

    Fun Alternatives: grab an arab friend and let them do the talking... or like me learn arabic and speak their language... do i have to think of everything??

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Tripoli Off The Beaten Path

  • Walk the streets of Tripoli

    Tripoli's center is very built upWhen looking from the castle walls (see castle tip for picture) it gives you some idea how built up it is.However this isn't always a bad thing... you can get yourself lost in the city very easily... yes ok that sounds like a bad thing but for me getting lost on holiday is good thing because you'll see many things...

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  • Burj es-Sabaa

    The Lion Tower is the only archaelogical site to see in the New City area. Originally there were decorations of lions lining the facade, but they are no longer there. Built at the end of the 1400's, it's a fairly interesting structure to see, but is not really near anything at all. I had to walk down the road to see it. Normally I think it is open...

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  • Hammam Al-Nouri

    The Hammam Al-Nouri is the real jewel of Tripoli: an unexpected jewel well hidden by shop fronts just opposite the Madrassah Al-Nouriyah. It was built around 1333 by the Mamluk governor Nur El-Din, and it houses a dressing room, a tepidarium, private bathing "rooms" (ma qsoura) and a huge hot water steam hall. What's great about this abandoned...

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Tripoli Favorites

  • Medieval City

    Tripoli's old city, with its medieval streets, hammams, madrassas and mosques, is a fascinating place to wander around. Most of it dates from the Mameluke construction period in the 14th and 15th centuries.

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  • three cities in one

    The origin of the name Tripoli (Trablos today, in Arabic) comes Tripolis or the "Tri-city". Because of the rocky promontory upon which it's built, it looks like there are 3 cities instead of one. Today Tripoli is the largest city in the north of Lebanon, with a population of about 500000 people. It's 85 kilometers from Beirut. I liked the...

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  • Tarablus (Tripoli) is a very...

    Tarablus (Tripoli) is a very confusing city, as the old part of town doesn't seem to follow any rules of town planning so it is easy to get absolutely lost. A nice place to get lost in though. The tourist office in Beirut has a map highlighting over 50 monuments to see, and away from the old city, is Al-Mina', the port area with a nice corniche and...

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Explore Deeper into Tripoli
St Gilles Citadel - Tripoli
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Madrassa al-Qartawiya
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Uwaysiyya Mosque
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al-Burtasiyyeh Mosque
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Madrassa an-Nasiriyya
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al-Mashhad
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Old Tripoli
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Tahhan Mosque
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Al Mina
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The Souk
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Crusader Castle of Saint Gilles
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Madrassas of Old Tripoli
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Hammams of Old Tripoli
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al-Muallaq Mosque
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The Ottoman Clock Tower
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Madrassa al-Khatouniyah
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Madrassa al-Qadiriyya
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Madrassa an-Nuriyya
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Madrassa al-Khairiya Hassan
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Madrassa as-Saqraqiyya
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Khan el Saboun (Soap Caravanserai)
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Mosques of Old Tripoli
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Citadel of Raymond de St. Gilles
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Madrassa al-Tuwashiyya
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Khan as-Saboun
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Great Mosque
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Madrassa al Khairiah Hassan
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Khan al-Khayyatin
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Madrassa al-Nouriyat
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Souks
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The Soap Makers
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Hammam al-Abd
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Hammam el-Abed (Turkish Baths)
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The Citadel
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The purest example of a Middle East coffee shop
Restaurants
As local a joint as you will find I'd say...
Restaurants
Taynal Mosque
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The Great Mosque
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Seafood in Al-Mina
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Oh God...more sweets...
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Map of Tripoli

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