Muscat Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by Ewingjr98
  • Local Customs
    by bradbeaman
  • Local Customs
    by Ewingjr98

Most Recent Local Customs in Muscat

  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Omani Money

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jul 25, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Omani rial (OMR) is the currency of Oman, and it is divided into 1000 baisa. Being a former British colony, Oman used Indian Rupees until 1940. From 1940 to 1970 the money was called the baisa, then the rial was introduced, and baisa remained the subdivision of the rial.

    Today, coin denominations are 5 baisa, 10 baisa, 25 baisa, and 50 baisa. Bank notes are 100 baisa, 200 baisa, 1/2 rial, 1 rial, 5 rial, 10 rial, 20 rial, and 50 rial. 50 rial might not sound like much, but at today's exchange rate of .385 rial to the US dollar, that is a 130 dollar bill!

    Was this review helpful?

  • peaceness98's Profile Photo

    Henna (Mehndi)

    by peaceness98 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    henna design filled with glitter

    Ladies can get their hands and feet decorated by Henna in most beauty salons for an average of 3 rials for hands, 5 for feet

    Lots of newer designs decorate other parts of the body as a temporary tatoo

    newer henna versions include the typical arabian red henna, sudanese black henna and even glitter nowadays

    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • georeiser's Profile Photo

    The people of Oman

    by georeiser Updated Jun 14, 2010
    The people of Oman
    4 more images

    The inhabitants in Oman are mostly Arabs with some minorities of Pakistanis, Indians and Africans.

    If you approach the locals in a decent way you will see how friendly they are. Smile and say hello, and you will receive a hello and a smile back. Some of the arab women will smile or giggle. The locals tolerate more from a westerner than the guest workers from India and Pakistan. But be wise and don't exploit this. Don't say hello to a woman if she is together with a man. And don't take photos without asking for it.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • georeiser's Profile Photo

    Dishdasha and cumma

    by georeiser Updated Jun 14, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kids with Dishdasha suits and cumma
    4 more images

    The Omanis are proud of their culture. I bought a Dishdasha, a kind of a suit for the "new generation" in Oman. And a cumma, which is a hat (see pictures). The locals gave me loudly credit for that. It was respectful to wear their clothes. Even though some Pakistani migrant workers didn't understand why I weared this unpractical suit. You can not run in a Dishdasha-suit, something I found out when I had to run across the street and stumbled.

    Instead of Cumma you can also wear a Shimagh (Head Scarf) or a folded Musar (head turban). I liked the head turban, but it was too difficult to wrap around the head.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    fish and the shortest road

    by call_me_rhia Written Dec 24, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    jeeps in the sea
    1 more image

    Quite some people (mostly ex-pats with their children) gather at dusk on the beach of shatti al qurm, and go watch the fishermen unlead their boat with their catch of the day. Those caught fish do not travel long distances before they are loaded again onto a jeep... because the jeep drives right into the water, where the boats arrive. All around... crying seagulls wanting to get their fair share. And many fish are left to them for supper. Small fish by Omani standards I guess... huge fish for swiss standard... oh to be a bird.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • victorwkf's Profile Photo

    Grand Mosque: Quran on the shelves

    by victorwkf Written Feb 9, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Books of the Quran at Grand Mosque, Muscat

    When exploring the prayer halls of the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque, you will discover the Quran on the shelves along the halls. There is the main series of a few books of the Quran, and next to them is the summarised index version of the Quran.

    Was this review helpful?

  • victorwkf's Profile Photo

    Grand Mosque: Washing area

    by victorwkf Written Feb 9, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Washing area of the Grand Mosque, Muscat

    Before going to the prayers, Muslims are supposed to wash themselves up at this nice washing area of the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque. Different areas of the washing area are for cleaning different parts of the body.

    Was this review helpful?

  • victorwkf's Profile Photo

    Grand Mosque: Direction of Prayer

    by victorwkf Written Feb 9, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Direction of Islamic prayers at Grand Mosque

    In order to mark the direction of the Islamic prayer (facing the holy city of Mecca) at the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque, there is an interesting structure (see photograph) which will serve as the guide during the praying ritual.

    Was this review helpful?

  • victorwkf's Profile Photo

    Grand Mosque: Chandeliers

    by victorwkf Written Feb 9, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Main chandelier at Grand Mosque, Muscat

    The chandeliers of the male prayer's hall of the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque are simply amazing and could rival others in the world, especially the main chandelier on top of the middle of the hall (see photograph).

    Was this review helpful?

  • victorwkf's Profile Photo

    Grand Mosque: Female Prayer's Hall

    by victorwkf Written Feb 9, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Female prayer's hall of the Grand Mosque

    The female prayer's hall of the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque is located at the side of the mosque and is predictably smaller than the male prayer's hall with less decorations. There are mounted televisions in this hall where the females would see the prayer ritual in the male prayer's hall and follow accordingly.

    Was this review helpful?

  • victorwkf's Profile Photo

    Grand Mosque: Male Prayer's Hall

    by victorwkf Written Feb 9, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Male prayer's hall of the Grand Mosque

    The male prayer's hall of the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque is simply huge, elegant and can house up to a few thousand Muslims at any one time. Besides the beautiful architecture, the carpet of this prayer room is actually made from one single piece which is one of the largest in the world !

    Was this review helpful?

  • jmschief's Profile Photo

    When in Rome

    by jmschief Written Jan 30, 2005
    playing the local

    If you're in Muscat at night-time, chances are that you'll be in a Restaraunt or Hotel Bar but for a change, we found a great little Sheesha Cafe which isn't licenced and you can go and have a smoke with the locals.

    Listen to the chit chat around you and immerse yourself in your surrountings

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Rinjani's Profile Photo

    Woman Traveller

    by Rinjani Written Nov 22, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Oman is beautiful and nice to explore, but it’s not that easy for single woman who travel alone. A simple tips for a woman traveler who decide to travel alone, just bear in mind that Arabic men usually don’t deal a lot with women. Dress carefully when you walk around the town, don’t wear revealing clothes when you travel alone.

    Another tips, some places that I’ve been are not really prepare for restroom for women. Either you need to use gent’s restroom or use a woman rest room which seems “untouched” for an ages. Just bring as many as wet tissue with you, that will be help.

    Was this review helpful?

  • TomorrowsAngel's Profile Photo

    The Grand Mosque

    by TomorrowsAngel Written Jul 6, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    sultan al qaboos mosque, muscat

    You are allowed to visit the mosque free of charge as long as you are modestly dressed with long sleeves and trousers.
    Women can wear: skirts as long as they are kneelength or greater, tops with high necklines, and hair must be covered.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • MNRR's Profile Photo

    A little respect goes a long way

    by MNRR Written May 13, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You only have to be a little considerate of local customs, as Oman is still an Islamic Country that is trying to come to terms with Tourism and all that implies. Covering of shoulders till just below the elbow is fine for women and men should wear long trousers so as not to offend the Omanis. Learning just a phrase or two like Salaam Aleikum (the most common greeting in Arabia) and other phrases will always be greeted with a smile. When sitting the soles of your feet should not be facing anybody as this is considered rude. Accept food with your right hand if possible as the left hand is thought to be 'unclean' and used for other purposes. If offered coffee in the tiny coffee cups, when you finish shake the cup from side to side to signify you do not want any more, or else you may find your cup being filled time and time again. If taking photographs of the local people please ask permission from them, after all how would you like to have a camera thrust in your face without anybody asking your first? The phrase to ask permission is.. Moomkin Sura?

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Muscat

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

97 travelers online now

Comments

Muscat Local Customs

Reviews and photos of Muscat local customs posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Muscat sightseeing.

View all Muscat hotels