Bethlehem Transportation

  • Transportation
    by machomikemd
  • Transportation
    by machomikemd
  • Transportation
    by machomikemd

Most Recent Transportation in Bethlehem

  • ligaya888's Profile Photo

    Bethlehem from Arab bus station in Jerusalem

    by ligaya888 Written Nov 24, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I went to Bethlehem in October 2007. From the Arab bus station on Nablus Rd. across from the Damascus Gate, I took Bus #21 (Bet Jella) cost 5.50NIS. I got off at the town center (bab isska) and took a taxi (10 NIS+) to Manger Square. From there, walked across to the Church of the Nativity and/or the St. Catherines Church. To go back, take taxi to the No. 21 bus terminal. At the checkpoint before entering Jerusalem, everyone gets off the bus to show their ID or passport and back on the same bus and continue to the Arab bus station on Nablus Rd. in East Jerusalem. If you don't want to take the taxi, you can walk upwards towards the souk, follow that road til you get to Manger Square.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oana_bic's Profile Photo

    Driving around

    by Oana_bic Written May 5, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Despite being warned and told by our hotel that we should go there with a guide and get a cab to get in, we have given it a try with our rent car and managed to get in and find a decent and looking like a safe parking with some friendly locals...they have eventually also exchanged us some money and guide us a bit around...

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oana_bic's Profile Photo

    Movement restrictions & West Bank barrier

    by Oana_bic Written May 5, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Most entrances into and exits from the Bethlehem agglomeration to the rest of the West Bank are currently subject to Israeli checkpoints and roadblocks, with the level of access varying based on Israeli security directives. Travel for Bethlehem's Palestinian residents from the West Bank into Israeli-controlled Jerusalem is regulated by a permit-system. Acquiring such permits to enter, what in the past served in many ways as an urban anchor to Bethlehem, has become exceedingly rare since the onset of the violence surrounding the al-Aqsa Intifada, though Israel has subsequently erected a terminal for the stated-aim of easing transit between the two adjoining cities. After the Intifada's onset, Bethlehem was periodically placed under strict curfews which prevent residents from leaving their homes. Palestinians are not allowed to enter the Jewish holy site of Rachel's Tomb, which is on the outskirts of the city. Since Bethlehem and the nearby biblical Solomon's Pools lie in Area A, Israeli citizens cannot go there without a permit from the Israeli military authorities.
    The construction by Israel of the West Bank barrier has had a severely negative impact on Bethlehem; politically, socially, and economically. The barrier runs along the northern side of the town's built-up area, within metres of houses in 'A'ida refugee camp on the one side, and the Jerusalem municipality on the other.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • jacobzoethout's Profile Photo

    From Jerusalem to Bethlehem and back again

    by jacobzoethout Written Oct 23, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Travelling from Jerusalem to Bethlehem should not be a too big problem, but things change quickly in this area. I was travelling on a day that the main border crossing was closed for Palestinians and there was no direct bus to the Wall. In a normal situation, take minibus no 22 from the bus station at Suleyman Street, Jerusalem. People will help you there finding the right bus. It cost about 3 NIS to take you to the border crossing.
    I was taken to the outskirts of western Bethlehem with bus no 21; a taxi from there to the centre costed me 40 NIS.
    Back from the centre of Bethlehem to the Wall, I took a taxi which costed 15 NIS, I paid 20 NIS. After the checkpoint, I had to walk a few hundred metres; an Arab minibus was waiting there heading for Jerusalem.

    The infamous Wall The gate in the Wall
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • blanter's Profile Photo

    Transportation from Jerusalem to Bethlehem

    by blanter Written Mar 20, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is what I did (March 2005).

    1. Take the bus from Damascus gate to one of Bethlehem checkpoints (there are several options, depending on the checkpoint). Costs less than NIS 10 (Eur 2).

    2. Cross the checkpoint by feet. You may or may not be asked to show your pasport.

    3. Either walk to the Nativity Church (this is what I did, not more than a hour) or take a taxi - there are plenty of them at the Palestinian side. The price can be negociated down to NIS 50.

    To go back, there is a large taxi stand in the town center, 10 minutes walk from the church. Otherwise, there are taxis just at the church entrance.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Avieira67's Profile Photo

    Bus from Bethlehem to Hebron

    by Avieira67 Updated Nov 25, 2015

    There is a direct bus from Bethlehem Bab Zqaq bus station to Hebron central bus station, close to the Old City.

    Fare
    NIS 6.0

    Trip Duration
    About 45 minutes

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Bethlehem

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

14 travelers online now

Comments

Bethlehem Transportation

Reviews and photos of Bethlehem transportation posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Bethlehem sightseeing.

View all Bethlehem hotels