Khirbat Qumran Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by machomikemd
  • Things to Do
    by machomikemd
  • Things to Do
    by machomikemd

Most Recent Things to Do in Khirbat Qumran

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    Qumran Archeological Sites 2

    by machomikemd Written Sep 18, 2013
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    part two of my tips with more pictures around

    this will be a two part tip with more pictures around the archelogical site in qumran of an essene village which was initially excavated by Roman Catholic Priest Roman Da voux from 1953 to 56 and then continued by Israel. The excavations include the Scriptorium, where the essenes where writing the scrolls (but no scrolls were found here, just at the caves about a stone's throw away, the Dining hall with earthquake cracks, the ritual bath house, the cemetery and the dam. These findings shed light on the lives of the people of the Dead Sea sects who lived in the area at the time of the rule of the House of the Hasmoneans. These people led here secluded and ascetic lives, far from any human settlement. Among the scrolls are the earliest manuscripts of the Old Testament and they were preserved exceptionally well due to the desert weather conditions in the area.

    Opening hours of Qumran National Park:
    April – September: 8 am – 5 pm
    October – March: 8 am – 4 pm
    Fridays and Holiday eves: 8 am – 3 pm

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    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    Qumran Archeological Sites 1

    by machomikemd Written Sep 18, 2013
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    this will be a two part tip with more pictures around the archelogical site in qumran of an essene village which was initially excavated by Roman Catholic Priest Roman Da voux from 1953 to 56 and then continued by Israel. The excavations include the Scriptorium, where the essenes where writing the scrolls (but no scrolls were found here, just at the caves about a stone's throw away, the Dining hall with earthquake cracks, the ritual bath house, the cemetery and the dam. These findings shed light on the lives of the people of the Dead Sea sects who lived in the area at the time of the rule of the House of the Hasmoneans. These people led here secluded and ascetic lives, far from any human settlement. Among the scrolls are the earliest manuscripts of the Old Testament and they were preserved exceptionally well due to the desert weather conditions in the area.

    Opening hours of Qumran National Park:
    April – September: 8 am – 5 pm
    October – March: 8 am – 4 pm
    Fridays and Holiday eves: 8 am – 3 pm

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits

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    Judean Desert

    by machomikemd Written Sep 18, 2013
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    A Large part of the West Bank lias along the Judean Desert, which is a separate desert from the Negev Desert of Southern israel. this Desert starts from the mountains near Jerusalem and goes down up to the Dead Sea and starts from just after Beit Shan and up to the Southern Dead Sea, just after Qumran, where it then becomes the Negev Desert. And the mountains and the flat plateau where the dead sea scrolls were found and the popular Nahal Kalya Beach Resort and Kibbutz are all located here at the Judean Desert and the main Highway, highway 90 goes to the Judean Desert from Northern Israel and then to the Negev Desert and ends at the border of Egypt in Eliat.

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    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Archeology

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    Southern Dead Sea

    by machomikemd Written Sep 18, 2013
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    I have included the Southern Dead Sea here in my Qumran Tips although it is further away, there are no major towns along it. The Southern Dead Sea is separated by the Lisan Peninsular from the Northern Dead Sea and is shallower and more Hypersaline than it's northern part and you can see huge blocks of salt crystals along it's shores and is where the major factories of the Israeli Side of the Dead Sea Products are located.

    We all know that the Dead sea is the lowest land elevation of the world at 377 m (1,237 ft) deep, and is the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. With 33.7% salinity as compared to the regular 4 to 5% salinity for the oceans, people can float at the dead sea plus the area has lots of minerals in the mud that is good for the skin hence the popularity of the dead sea as a resort. Dead Sea Products for skin and facial skin are available and the most popular Jordanian Dead Sea Product is the Revage Dead Sea Products (The Israeli side is the Ahava Dead Sea Products).

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    Northern Dead Sea

    by machomikemd Written Sep 18, 2013
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    The Dead Sea is within view of Qumran and the Scrolls are named for the Dead Sea. The Dead Sea is Divided into the Jordanian Side and the Israel (West Bank) Side. the dead sea is actually composed of two parts, the larger Northern Dead Sea and the smaller Southern Dead sea, which is separated by the Lisan Peninsular. This will be on the Northern Dead Sea, where most of the resorts of the Dead Sea (Both in Israel and Jordan) are located as the southern dead sea of more for producing the dead sea minerals and mud pack products.

    We all know that the Dead sea is the lowest land elevation of the world at 377 m (1,237 ft) deep, and is the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. With 33.7% salinity as compared to the regular 4 to 5% salinity for the oceans, people can float at the dead sea plus the area has lots of minerals in the mud that is good for the skin hence the popularity of the dead sea as a resort. Dead Sea Products for skin and facial skin are available and the most popular Jordanian Dead Sea Product is the Revage Dead Sea Products (The Israeli side is the Ahava Dead Sea Products).

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Water Sports
    • Road Trip

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    The Caves of Qumran

    by machomikemd Written Sep 18, 2013
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    Just beyond the unearthed excavations of the village of the Essens are the caves carved from the Judean Mountains Fronting Qumran where the famed dead sea scrolls were found. The Qumran Scrolls were discovered in 1946 by a Bedouin shepherd who went to look for a missing goat and instead found a cave which contained scrolls hidden inside pottery jars. This find led to the discovery of more than 700 scrolls in the area since then and the cave number four is the most famous and you can see it at the vista point in the archeological park proper.

    Opening hours of Qumran National Park:
    April – September: 8 am – 5 pm
    October – March: 8 am – 4 pm
    Fridays and Holiday eves: 8 am – 3 pm

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    Qumran Mini Museum and Dead Sea Scrolls

    by machomikemd Updated Sep 18, 2013
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    after the 8 minute video presentation about the Dead Sea Scrolls and on the Essenes and Qumram in General, you will then proceed to the air conditioned mini museum that houses various archeological remains, artifacts, devices for scroll making and some of the actual dead sea scroll parchments that are hang upon the walls of this mini museum (there are full size replicas of the ritual baths, dining room, pottery workshops and writing room of the essenes) and after about 10 minutes, you are then ushered outside to the Main Archeological Site, when you can see the various remains of the houses, villas and some of the caves where they found the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Essene Village in Qumran.

    Opening hours of Qumran National Park:
    April – September: 8 am – 5 pm
    October – March: 8 am – 4 pm
    Fridays and Holiday eves: 8 am – 3 pm

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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    Qumran Presentation Theater

    by machomikemd Written Sep 18, 2013
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    Before embarking on a 1 to 2 hour tour of the Qumran National Park, your tour will start via an 8 minute short video clip about the Jewish Sect, the Essenes, who are the inhabitants of Qumran and on their beliefs and practices, and on how they wrote and store the dead sea scrolls which were found in 1946. The film is played at a small theater at the entrance to the mini museum and after your video presentation, you will then proceed to the mini museum and to the outside archeological site proper.

    Opening hours of Qumran National Park:
    April – September: 8 am – 5 pm
    October – March: 8 am – 4 pm
    Fridays and Holiday eves: 8 am – 3 pm

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    Scrolls Cave

    by Martin_S. Updated Jul 3, 2008

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    Qumran, Scrolls Cave, Israel
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    When standing in front of this sign which explains how and where the Dead Sea scrolls were found, you can see in the hills the actual cave were they were discovered. When we visited there, the path up to the caves was closed.

    The second photo shows one of the access paths, it helps get from point to point without climbing over the structures themselves. This is NOT accessible for wheelchairs since at some points they have introduced stairs, but if you have difficulty walking on uneven groud, then this would help.

    The last photo shows a closeup of the sign and it also has an anomoly....the booklet that the National Parks Authority gives a visitor when you purchase your ticket says that the scrolls were discovered in 1947, but this sign says 1952, as far as I remember when I visited the Shrine of The Book in Jerusalem where the scrolls are preserved, it was written 1947.

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    Living at Qumran

    by Martin_S. Updated Jul 3, 2008

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    Qumran, aqueduct, Israel
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    How do you live in the middle of a remote desert without a source of fresh water...well the answer is that you conserve and collect ever drop of water that falls out of the sky, yes the RAIN....Here at Qumran there are, like many desert outposts, a series of cisterns for collection of water. The photo shows one of the aquaducts built to transfer the water to a cistern.

    The second photo shows one of the kilns in the kitchen area, used both for daily bread and the ritual bread used for the Friday meal.

    The last photo shows two things. In the foreground is the room where they found many desks and inkstands. The archeologists think that this is the Scriptorium (or writing room) where many of the scrolls found here may have been written. But also take a look in the background, there is lush GREEN growth...this area has small trees and shrubs that grow well in salty water. What a place to sit and contemplate, high desert mountains to one side and the enormous Dead Sea and this green swath below you on the other side....nice.

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    Ritual Baths

    by Martin_S. Written Jul 3, 2008

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    Qumran, ritual bath, Israel
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    The Jewish religious culture revolved as most religious cultures do, around rituals. One of them is the ritual clenseing (or bathing) in the Mikveh. Here in this small remote community on the shores of the Dead Sea with NO source of water, the Essenes would use their water that was gathered from rainfall into cisterns, to fill these ritual baths. Here you can see several of them.
    If you would like to learn more of this ritual, take a look at:
    http://www.jafi.org.il/education/lifecycle/jewishlc/mikve.html

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    • Archeology
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    • National/State Park

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    The SCROLLS

    by Martin_S. Written Jul 3, 2008

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    Dead Sea Scroll replica, Qumran, Israel

    The famous Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered here in Qumran by a Bedoun shepard in 1947 and from thre begins the adventure. Today many other scrolls haved been found and they included books of the Old Testament, the Apocrypha and works of the Essenes themselves. The Dead Sea Scrolls are on display at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem today in a building designed and constructed ONLY for them, it is called "The Shrine of The Book". What I have always found so fascinating is that if you know modern Hebrew you can actually READ this document over 2000 years old, or at least parts of it.

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    QUMRAN Script Rolls

    by WStat Written Jun 9, 2008
    Qumran excavations
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    Qumran is located on a dry plateau about a mile inland from the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea in the West Bank, just next to the Israeli Kibbutz of Kalia. Qumran is best known as the settlement nearest to the hiding place of the Dead Sea Scrolls in the caves of the sheer desert cliffs.
    In 1947 two Bedouin shepherds accidentally came across a clay jar in a cave near Khirbet Qumran that contained seven parchment scrolls.The documents contain over 100 copies of the books of the Hebrew Bible, most of which survived only as fragments. Out of 24 books all except the Book of Ester are represented.
    The community to which the Dead Sea Scrolls apparently belonged occupied Qumran around 130 BCE to 70 CE, and possibly lived also in other places in the region. The name "Dead Sea Sect" was given to it because the main knowledge of the sect derives from these manuscripts.

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    A view around

    by FruitLover Updated Sep 13, 2006

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    North of Judean Desert, near Dead Sea

    The Essenes were ascetics, and as such, had paid great attention to ritual bathing and purity. They lived a communal life in a settlement that was constructed to make them as self-reliant as possible. They had assembly halls, a central dining room, in which ceremonial meals were eaten, a kitchen, ritual baths, a laundry room, a watch tower, a stable and pottery workshop.

    Members of the sect lived in huts and tents. The central cemetery of the sect was also located at Qumran.

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    • Desert
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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    One of the caves

    by FruitLover Updated Sep 13, 2006

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    One of the caves where the scrolls were found.

    One of the caves where the scrolls were found.

    The caves that dot the difficult-to-reach slopes and crevices of Qumran had served the Essenes in time of need as hiding places for their library. The scrolls, hidden in jars for nearly two thousand years and preserved as a result of the area's arid climate, included books of The Old Testament, the Apocrypha and the sect's own works.

    Some of these scrolls are on display at "The Shrine of the Book" in the Israel Museum.

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    • Archeology
    • Desert

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