Doha Local Customs

  • The Traditional Dhow Festival  -Not to be Missed!
    The Traditional Dhow Festival -Not to...
    by greekcypriot
  • The Traditional Dhow Festival  -Not to be Missed!
    The Traditional Dhow Festival -Not to...
    by greekcypriot
  • The Traditional Dhow Festival  -Not to be Missed!
    The Traditional Dhow Festival -Not to...
    by greekcypriot

Best Rated Local Customs in Doha

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    Hooka / Shisha

    by frankcanfly Updated Mar 26, 2006

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    Most restaurants offer a Hooka for customers to smoke. It actually smells quite delicious when you walk past. The cost is about 15 to 20 Riyal

    You can buy them at the Souqs too, for a reasonable price.

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    • Food and Dining
    • Arts and Culture

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    dress code

    by call_me_rhia Updated Jan 22, 2009

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    women shopping
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    Although Qatari people dress in a very traditional way, there is no dresscode for foreigners - which means that you could wear whatever you like. In practice - while you are not required to wear a dishdasha or an abbaya - it would be so much better to wear some modest clothes, which means no shorts for men, no mini-skirts for women, and no tank tops for both.

    Judging from what my (conservative) Libyan friend Hajer wears, I would say that if you are a lady, you really don't need to wear baggy clothes... She covers up very well, with trousers and long-sleeved blouses, but her clothes are very fashionable and tight-fitting. Occasionally she would wear a short dress over light long trousers. If you are not a muslim, there's no need to wear a headscarf... and no one will give you strange looks if you don't wear it.

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    Praying direction

    by globetrott Written Jul 18, 2014

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    This is of course a service that is ment only for Moslems staying in that hotel, but it is an interesting detail that I do not remember to have seen in my hotel in Dubai for instance.
    You will find this small signpost next to your bed.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

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  • frankcanfly's Profile Photo

    Sadu Weaving

    by frankcanfly Written Apr 3, 2006

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    "Al Sadu" is the term used for the weaving process, is an old Arabic term that means to stretch or extend. Creating these beautifully decorated tents, rugs, cushions and camel bags was traditionally the Bedouin womens' way of live for many generations.

    Wool is used from Goats, Sheep and Camels. The camels are used for the softer applications, while Goats' wool is used to create virtually waterproof tents.

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    Wind Tower House

    by frankcanfly Written Apr 5, 2006

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    This type of architecture is common within the Gulf region. These towers were historically built to bring cool fresh air into the home before the days of air conditioning.

    In the Doha area, there are many 'new' examples of this type of architecture, such as at the Ras Al Nasaa restaurant. This photo is of one of the original ones, located just off Grand Hamad street in Najada Shopping Plaza. It was built in 1935 and restored in 1982.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Bustling Coffeehouses

    by bpwillet Written Apr 10, 2006

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    An outdoor coffeeshop in Doha's souqs

    There are not too many outdoor coffee houses and fewer traditional coffee houses in Doha. With the "new" old souq area there are now quite a few that have sprung up. As you zig-zag past shops and shop owners hawking their wears, you may find yourself down an alley that opens up to a coffee shop. There are a few to choose from in the souq area off Hamdan road. You will find many men sitting talking, playing backgammon, smoking sheeshas, and drinking coffee.

    The coffee is inexpensive and the atmosphere is lively.

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    Tea or drink

    by shala_booo Updated May 18, 2007

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    Everytime you are offered a drink in an office or house, it is an insult to refuse a tea or a drink.
    When you are done and you don't want another, shake the tea cup handle from side to side to let them know you are done and dont want another.

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    Alcohols

    by shala_booo Written May 18, 2007

    Beers, wines and other alcoholic drinks can only be found at bars located at hotels. There are stiff fines for consuming alcohols other than on licensed premises, or at home (if you have a liquor permit).
    Drink-driving is a serious offense and the country applies zero tolerance attitude to drugs.
    No establishments serve alcohols during the days of Ramadan.

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    Codes of Clothing Conduct

    by shala_booo Written May 18, 2007

    Qatar is an islamic state and as a courtesy, visitors should dress modestly. Normal swimwears, including bikinis, is acceptable on the beach or by the pool, but t-shirts and discreet covering of the legs is desirable if you move away from these places. Topless sunbathing is not permitted.
    Be particularly conscious of your dress code when visiting public places like the malls or parks or souq areas especially areas frequented by mixed nationalities. Women should avoid wearing spaghetti-strap or see-though blouses and short skirts.
    It is considered particularly important to dress modestly during the Holy Fasting month of Ramadan.

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    • Arts and Culture

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  • frankcanfly's Profile Photo

    Orry the Oryx - The 2006 Asian Games

    by frankcanfly Updated Apr 4, 2011
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    With the approaching Asian Games of 2006, the official mascot is popping up all over town.

    It's Orry the Oryx. You'll find him dressed up in the costumes of several of the athletic events. He'll appear to you in the form of statues and posters all over the city.

    This is the most obvious image of Orry; a huge statue on the Corniche that incorporates a countdown to the games of December 2006.

    The games are scheduled for 1-15 December 2006. Book your rooms now. If you'd like to volunteer, they go to the website for more information.

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    Don't offer to shack hands if you are a female

    by divecat1978 Written Jul 7, 2006

    It was first time meeting up my auditor in his office. Well, I had offer a hand shake but rejected by him because Islamic guys don't touch womens' hand unless they are husband and wife. I came from a Muslim country too, so I understand why he rejected my hand shake. It would be better to greet them by saying "Hello", "Good morning", "Good afternoon" or "Good evening".

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Desert

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Camels

    by mikey_e Written Nov 27, 2012
    Camels by al Khoot Fort
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    We often think of camels as brutish beasts that, like donkeys, were mainly pack animals. While this may be true today for some tourist resorts, the presence of the camel in the collective memory of the Gulf Arabs is a dear one. In the desert, along the trade routes that provided many with their livelihood before the discovery of oil, camels were the salvation of man. Their ability to trek for days without refreshment was invaluable in barren expanses of desert. Their milk, rich in nutrients and filling like no other milk, gave sustenance to the nomads. In times of plenty, they were slaughtered for feasts and special occasions. Camels today are still kept by Gulf Arabs, and are treated with the same respect as prize race horses.

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    Falconry

    by mikey_e Written Nov 27, 2012
    Falcons at Jayda Souq
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    Falconry is a serious sport in the Persian Gulf. The Crown Prince of the UAE is a champion falconer, and wealthy members of Gulf society will often consider practicing the sport to be, along with horsemanship and poetry composition, a mark of having mastered the fine traditions of the Gulf Arab World. Of course, falcons are expensive birds, and they are not nearly as common in nature as they once were, but it is possible to see the fine, trained specimens on sale at the Jayda Souq, near Waqif Souq in downtown Doha. Falcons can be vicious – they were trained to hunt, like dogs for the fox hunt – but it is hard not to feel a bit of awe and respect for these majestic birds when up close to them. At some events, trainers will also allow their birds to sit on visitors hands, and they can be quite tame and docile while in their master’s care.

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    • Arts and Culture

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    Toilet

    by frankcanfly Updated Apr 4, 2006

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    If you are acustomed to Western style toilets, you may have to make a quick adjustment in an 'emergency'

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    Men's dress codes

    by travelmad478 Written Mar 23, 2005

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    Many Qatari men and those from the Arabian peninsula wear the white robes called thobe, with a white or checked ghutra (scarf). However, Western dress is seen just as often.

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Doha Local Customs

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