Old City, Jiddah

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Downtown Jiddah

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  • Jeddah Old Buildings
    Jeddah Old Buildings
    by arabian10
  • Beit Shaykhoun's main entrance
    Beit Shaykhoun's main entrance
    by mikey_e
  • Another view of the souq
    Another view of the souq
    by mikey_e
  • kenyneo's Profile Photo

    Hubbly bubbly his way to relaxation ...

    by kenyneo Updated Apr 8, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    HUbbly Bubbly

    Well did you see what the man is doing ? Well he is taking a puff ...yes but the Middle Eastern way ....commonly called hubbly bubbly ( most probably because you can see the bubbling water ) its called Hookah here.

    Hookah history is rich and very controversial. It is said that the water pipe originated in India where it was made from coconut shells and then spread to Iran and into different parts of the Arab world

    Hookah smoke isn't harsh or irritating like cigars and cigarettes. Flavored with fruit, molasses, and honey, shisha is a treat for the senses. Hookah smoking also requires us to pause and take a break from our hectic daily routine.

    Preparing it isnt an easy job , but there are some places catered to such a hobby where everything is prepared for you .

    The preparation is like followings -

    Start by filling up the base with water so the water level reaches the bottom of the bottle neck. Next you'll want to insert the shaft into the base and secure the tray on top of the shaft. Place the bowl grommet over the top of the shaft and you're ready to set up the bowl.
    Sprinkle the shisha tobacco into the bowl. Secure the bowl screen on top of the bowl or you can use tin foil that's been poked so there are small holes. Once the bowl has been packed, secure it onto the bowl grommet.
    Lighting the charcoals is the last step. Use the tongs to place a lit charcoal on top of the bowl screen or tin foil, and then take a couple of puffs to get the hookah smoking.

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  • kenyneo's Profile Photo

    Old houses ...

    by kenyneo Written Mar 21, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Collosal old building

    Well it is really a tall , partial wooden house which has so many units ....beautiful but unfortumately left unattended and almost dilapidated ....

    you can hear her whispering her sadness and old age to those passer by and tourist who stopped to take a snap ....

    is anyone doing anything to save her ?

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  • DunaKal's Profile Photo

    The old customs office

    by DunaKal Updated Oct 15, 2008

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    The gate

    This is a picture of the old Jeddah customs building,,it was built near the sea port..I took a picture of the gate where it had a large sign saying(The library &The documents) and a smaller sign saying that the entrance is on the other side of the building.

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    Beit Nassif

    by TomorrowsAngel Written Sep 18, 2003

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    beit nassif

    Nassif House was built in the 1870s for the Nassif family, one of Jeddah’s oldest & most respected merchant clans, it was home to 100 members of the family & their staff. The building has four storeys at the front & seven at the back, & until the 1970s it was the tallest building in Jeddah.
    King Abdulaziz requisitioned the house in 1925 while his palace was being constructed – hence the name of its location, King Abdul Historical Square. The King & his army were welcomed here by the people of Jeddah on 23 September 1924, celebrated every year since as National Day.
    Note the tree in front of the house – until 1920 this was the only one in Jeddah (but now one of 10 million!).
    In 1964 the government bought the house & converted it into a museum, now housing an interesting cultural & heritage exhibition.
    Open Saturday-Thursday, 0900-1300. Admission free.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Church of Jeddah (ruins)

    by MM212 Updated Dec 21, 2011

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    Ruins of the Jeddah Church, Dec 2010

    Standing in ruins north of el-Balad (Old Jeddah) is one of the few churches built in recent history within the lands controlled by Saudi. Little is known about the exact history, but it is thought to have been a British (Anglican) church, probably constructed either in the late 1910s under the Ottoman Empire or the early 1920s during the ephemeral independent Kingdom of Hijaz when the British had a strong presence in Jeddah. The church operated before this region fell into the hands of the intolerant Wahhabi zealots who came from Nejd in central Arabia. The Hijaz (western Arabia) until today, Jeddah included, practises a more tolerant brand of Islam, closer to Syria and Egypt in traditions, and very much at odds with the puritanical Wahhabi ideology imposed by the al-Saud dynasty, which occupied and annexed this region along with its holy cities of Mecca and Medina beginning in 1924. With their arrival, the Wahhabis forbade the public practice of other religions, including Christianity and Judaism - so contrary to the Islamic tradition they claim to uphold - and most probably forced the closure of this lone church in Jeddah. It is unclear whether the structure fell into ruins over time or was destroyed by the Wahhabis themselves, but the latter is more likely given that they also destroyed numerous important Islamic holy shrines, which they deemed heretic. The Church of Jeddah has remained in ruins behind a wall for nearly a century, but is unlikely to be protected if a development on the site is ever contemplated (Note that many religious officials deny that this structure was ever a church). There is also a Christian cemetery in Jeddah, walled up and inaccessible, but maintained by foreign consulates.

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  • DunaKal's Profile Photo

    Old Houses

    by DunaKal Updated Sep 20, 2003

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    Old House in DownTown Jeddah

    In this picture you can see more of the old buildings in Jeddah,where the windows apear more(it`s called Rawasheen in the local language).
    When I took this picture I relised that there was a man looking from the window(Not seen in the picture).for a second I thought he would come out of his house and ask me why the heck am I taking pictures of his house,,but thank God he didn`t,LOL!!!

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  • Jeddah yesterday and today

    by arabian10 Written Feb 26, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jeddah the fragrance of the past magnificence of the present lamps of love. People of Jeddah symbol of generosity and nobility. Since the dawn of the flourishing Saudi era all available potentials were utilized to the maximum. The fountains of welfare flowed abundantly, so that Jeddah, like other cities, was able to enjoy ample share of progress and development. All basic foundations for its progress and construction were laid down. Jeddah became the Sleepless City, with over one hundred and twenty thousand lamp posts illuminating its streets and lanes, restoring daylight to its night with absolute contentment.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Hanafi Mosque

    by MM212 Updated Dec 21, 2011

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    Hanafi Mosque, Dec 2010
    3 more images

    One of the largest in Old Jeddah, Hanafi Mosque was built in 1902 AD when the city was still part of the Ottoman Empire. Although painted white and lacks a dome, this mosque is very Ottoman in style, particularly its minaret, which is thin and pencil-shaped with geometric designs, similar to those seen in Istanbul.

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  • Jeddah Old Photo

    by arabian10 Written Feb 26, 2005

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    King Fahad when he was minister of information

    Jeddah the bride of the Red Sea, contains many old buildings. Some of them are still existing like: AAL-Nasif house, AL-Jamjoum House at AL-Yeman area, Baeshen House, AL-Gabil House, AL- Shfie Mosque at AL-Mazloum area, AL Banajah House, AL Alzaher at AL-Sham area, some of these buildings eached more than 30 meters in height.

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  • Shogun Palace!

    by Al3Anani Written Mar 3, 2005

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    Look at the Hejazi Architecture it looks like a big mix of all the cultures in the world it is because Jeddah and the Hejaz are very open, for 1300 years they were receiving muslims from all over the islamic world thats why its architecture has a little thing from everything! And thats what makes it unique and beautiful!

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    al-Shafe'i Mosque

    by MM212 Updated Dec 22, 2011

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    Minaret of al-Ateeq Mosque, Dec 2010
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    Officially called Masjid al-Shafe'i, this mosque is also known as el-Jame'i al-Ateeq (i.e., the Ancient Mosque). It is Jeddah's oldest mosque and was traditionally the grand mosque, before the city expanded beyond the Mediaeval walls. The exact founding date is unknown, but is generally believed to be in the 7th century AD when Jeddah was designated as the entry port for Mecca. The structure is known to have been rebuilt in the late 13th century AD under the Mamluke dynasty. The minaret, the oldest standing in Jeddah, is from this period and is certainly Mamluke in style: octagonal shape, simple stalactite muqaranas decorations, and a bulbous dome. The interior of the mosque consists of an open courtyard next to a covered prayer hall. This part of the mosque was rebuilt once or twice since the 13th century, but the prayer hall has conserved an old mihrab and minbar (prayer niche and pulpit). The mosque is located on Souk el-Jame'i Street (the Mosque Souk) in Haret el-Mazloom quarter of Old Jeddah.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Madrassa al-Falah

    by MM212 Updated Dec 22, 2011

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    Madrassa al-Falah, Dec 2010
    3 more images

    Opened in 1905 AD, Madrassa al-Falah was the first organised school built in Jeddah (and the entire Arabian peninsula). Hard to believe, but prior to that, education was confined to mosques and homes. It was commissioned by Mohammed Alireza Zeinal, a prominent local pearl trader, from one of Jeddah's merchant families, who had to seek permission from the Ottoman Governor to open the school. It is said that his wife sold her jewellery in order to fund the school. Most of Jeddah's oldest men were educated at this school. It is located in the heart of al-Balad, Old Jeddah, and is recognisable by its green dome and the very colourful entrance (see attached photos).

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  • kenyneo's Profile Photo

    Old house in Souq Al Alawi

    by kenyneo Updated Aug 22, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    green and full of history

    Though I have traveled to numerous cities in Saudi Arabia ...it sonly in Jeddah that I see such beautiful old houses, with intricate designs...in Dammam , where I live houses are so monotonous and plain. I think a city without architectural uniqueness is dead...
    I believe its these design and decor that gives the city its life ...

    But I observe that many of these houses are in dilapidated form ...is the goverment doing something ? because once they are gone ...they will be forever gone :-(

    ( just like how my hometown Penang was robbed off her beauty )

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  • Jeddah Old photo

    by arabian10 Written Feb 26, 2005

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    A vehicle for rent, Jeddah , carrying Hajjis 1935

    The road to Makkah and Madinah used to take days where caravans on camels and other animals suffered tiresome trips. During the prosperous Saudi era and after having laid down the wise plan of expansion, a huge network of roads was constructed linking Jeddah to Makkah in less than one hour and to Madinah, in less than four hours through an express way of six tracks on each side. Necessary services are available along these roads the clock.

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  • AliJoe's Profile Photo

    OLD JEDDAH

    by AliJoe Updated May 27, 2004

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    SAOUQ, OLD CITY JEDDAH

    PHOTO : OLD JEDDAH, LOCATED SAOUQ (SHOPPING AREA).

    The Saouq or Bazaar located in the Old Jeddah. Anybody love for antique, this is a hareem for antique shooping. I like to move a round and seeing people activities here, tired...stop over at any coffe shop along side of Saouq.

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