Damascus Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by Robin020
  • Local Customs
    by Robin020
  • Local Customs
    by Robin020

Most Recent Local Customs in Damascus

  • uglyscot's Profile Photo

    Coffee

    by uglyscot Written Sep 30, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Coffee anyone?

    Coffee is an art. Different places have different ways of making and serving it.
    In a restaurant we were served by a 'awi' [magician], who made a great todo over serving the cofee. he was dressed in traditional clothes and was quite a character.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Business Travel

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  • Hospitality

    by anastasia-t Written Nov 17, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you come here, forget the frase"no,thank you I am on diet..Iam full ect".People are really hospital and they call you at their houses for dinner or coffee all the time,even if it is the first time they meet you. And the best part is that there is nothing to worry about.You can go and feel like your home!

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  • xaver's Profile Photo

    Mosques

    by xaver Written Jan 6, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    mosque

    What susrprised and amazed me about mosques in Damascus, was, above all the atmosphear, as I said, you see people really concentrated in their deep comunication the divinity, but you also see kids studying corano, or persons chatting, or someone resting, everything, is so not formal, who sits down who stands up, who simply walk around who kneels down, it is a place for the whole comunity something like a refuge from the corrupted outside world.

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  • albateh's Profile Photo

    Damascus

    by albateh Updated Aug 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    By channeling the Barada it has been possible to create gardens right to the very heart of the lower town. To the north-west however the city has flung itself far up the rocky slopes of the Jabal Qassiun, whose summit (1,115 m) is topped by a television mast.
    These higher parts of the city are populous and poor, with the exception of the district known as Al Mouhajarine (bounded to the south by the rue Beirouny, and the rue Nazem Basha), where great modern blocks face out over the vast urban panorama extending away to meet the green Ghouta. Saahat Khorshid, a small square where several bus lines have their terminus, offers a similar view; there is a café there with several terraces from which to enjoy it. A new road has now been built up the mountain from the other side, emerging near the summit to command another fine view over the city.

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    Al MArsa, 7/7 internet cafe

    by call_me_rhia Written Jan 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    business card, internet caf��

    Al-Merjeh square is the place to go to find internet cafös.. there's plenty of them! However I feel like recommending this one for two reasons: first of all it has a decent speed (thanks ADSL) and secondly because it's open on Friday as well, while most others are closed. The owner speaks good English, which is quite a plus. It's on the first floor of the Al Murabit building

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    walking on art - tridimensional street art

    by call_me_rhia Written Jan 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    pavement in old damascus

    damascus... ok, heavenly city... i said it before.... there's really beauty everywhere. Look around: beautiful palaces,souqs, shrines and mosques. Look up: mynareths of perfect beauty. And finally look down: the pavement... wonderful... all decorated with stones of different colours laid out in geometrical designs... Definitely a tridimensional beauty!

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    No-one (male or female) wears...

    by maykal Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    No-one (male or female) wears shorts in Damascus. Women need to cover up, but don't need to cover their hair. There are no set rules, and you can wear what you want, but if you wear tight and revealing clothes, you'll get a lot of unwanted attention, and (depending on what you wear) you might offend a lot of people too. Dress modestly...shirts (with sleeves for women), trousers/jeans, etc... I have seen many tourists not following these simple guidelines, the worst being a group of Australian girls dressed as if they were on Bondi Beach, moaning about all the attention they were getting. Basically, just look around and see what Syrians are wearing...it makes sense, too, to dress similarly, because then you can visit mosques without worrying if you are suitably dressed.

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    As Islamic countries go, Syria...

    by maykal Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As Islamic countries go, Syria is a fairly relaxed place, maybe due to the large Christian minority. However, to avoid offending any Muslims you meet, here are a few tips....Shake hands with men, but not with women, unless they offer you their hand. Don't bring any food to your mouth with your left hand, and offer someone something with your left hand...the right hand is used for eating, the left is used for something completely different!! Don't sit with your legs crossed, as showing the sole of your foot is rude. If you are invited to someone's house, take your shoes off if you see that your hosts have taken theirs off. In mosques, take your shoes off to enter the prayer hall. It is better to visit mosques outside prayer times, and be careful about taking pictures of people praying. With pictures, many Syrians love having their photograph taken, and will ask you. But there are always some (especially women) who will object...always ask first before taking people's photos. In Damascus, I noticed that some Christian Syrians objected to being greeted with the Muslim greeting 'as-salaam aleikum', so if you are unsure about someone's religion, stick to 'Marhaba' or let them greet you first and copy. In Ramadan, during the day when Muslims are fasting, don't eat or drink in the street (although this doesn't really apply to the Christian areas of Damascus, where during Ramadan people tend to eat in the street more than normal!!!).

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  • titti's Profile Photo

    Women observe strict rules...

    by titti Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Women observe strict rules about dress, but nobody ask you, woman, to cover your body from head to foot , unless you are going to visit the Great Mosque. Just few meters from the main entrance there’s a small office were women can (well, they “must”) hire the “brown clothes”. Although I hate brown, I was comfortable in that stuff; I didn’t feel “out of it” like sometimes happens..

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  • fabrice's Profile Photo

    place des martyrs is the place...

    by fabrice Written Aug 24, 2002

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    place des martyrs is the place where the israeli spy elie cohen was hung to death in public.He gave a lot of information to israel concerning the military syrian plans to attack israel from the golan.he succeeded to live around syrian personnalities in damascus,saying he was a wealthy argentinian born in syria

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  • themagiclake's Profile Photo

    Souk al-Hamidiyeh

    by themagiclake Written Dec 7, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Souk al-Hamidiyeh, the most famous souk of Damascu

    I love your feeling of proud, i love to see how your eyes become of fire while talking of it....

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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Damascus Local Customs

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