Sayyida Ruqayya Mosque, Damascus

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  • More of the elaborate ceiling
    More of the elaborate ceiling
    by mikey_e
  • Tomb of Sayyid Ruqqiya
    Tomb of Sayyid Ruqqiya
    by mikey_e
  • A view into the prayer hall
    A view into the prayer hall
    by mikey_e
  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Prayer Hall and Courtyard

    by mikey_e Written Nov 23, 2012

    In contrast to the tomb area of the shrine, the courtyard and the prayer hall are calm and well-organized sections. The courtyard is filled with pilgrims from various parts of the Shiite world (there are lots of Iranian and Azeri pilgrims who visit the shrine), and they set up camp here, resting , eating and chatting before prayer. While the courtyard and the surrounding areas for leaving your shoes are Spartan, the prayer hall itself is just as ornate and sumptuously decorated as the tomb room. This area is far wider than the tomb area, as it must accommodate hundreds of the faithful who pray together (men in front and women behind) when the call is sounded.

    Courtyard of the shrine Entrance to the shrine Interior of the shrine More of the courtyard
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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    The Tomb

    by mikey_e Written Nov 23, 2012

    The Tomb of Sayyida Ruqqiya is a popular pilgrimage destination for Shiites, and it helps to make Damascus a major pilgrimage centre after Mecca, Madinah and the holy cities in Iraq. Sayyida Ruqqiya was born Sukayna, the daughter Imam Hussain, who is considered to be the third Imam by Shia Muslims. Sukayna died at the age of four in the prison of the Umayyad Regent Yazid, following the defeat and murder of her father. As the granddaughter of Ali and the great-granddaughter of Muhammad, she is considered to be a member of Ahl al-Bayt (a member of the family of Muhammad). The current site of her tomb is where her remains were moved after the flooding of Yazid’s prison. The shrine was constructed in 1985 and is richly ornate, replete with plenty of mirroring, brocade, gold accents and glass. The tomb itself is gilded. You will be hard-pressed to be able to approach the tomb, as there appears to be a constant crush of men trying to kiss it and press their bodies against it, or to rub cloths against the bars, presumably to take them back to their home countries as talismans. Around the tomb, in the men’s section at least, there are groups of worshippers, often enthralled by firebrand clerics who whip up the crowds with the details of Husain’s family’s ordeals. Other men pray and are lost in personal devotion. The atmosphere in the room around the tomb may be tense, but it is a tension borne from the extremely emotional nature of many people’s prayers, and the visceral reactions they display to their presence before the tomb of a martyr.

    Tomb of Sayyid Ruqqiya Worshippers at the tomb Chandelier and glasswork More of the elaborate ceiling A view into the prayer hall
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    Sayyida Ruqayya Mosque

    by MM212 Updated Apr 13, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the newest structures in Old Damascus, the Sayyida Ruqayya Mosque was built in 1985 over the tomb of the great grand daughter of the prophet Mohammed. Although she is venerated by all Muslims, she is raised to saint-like status among Shiites. Due to this religious significance, the mosque's construction completely funded by Iran, hence the onion dome and other obvious Persian architectural influences. It is worth entering the mosque to see an extremely unusual interior covered with a mosaic of reflective mirrors. As the Lonely Planet said: "If they built mosques in Las Vegas, this is what they'd look like."

    Top of the onion dome Persian Style Exterior Reflective Mirrors Tomb of Ruqayya
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    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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    Sayyida Ruqayya Mosque

    by siaki68 Written Apr 28, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sayyida Ruqayya was the daughter of the martyr Hussein of Kerbala and she is a Shiite saint. In 1985 the Iranians constructed a mosque around her mausoleum, designed in the typical Persian style with an interior decorated with plenty of mirrors and mosaics. It is located at the north of Umayyad Mosque. Visitors are welcomed; women have to wear the black robe, which is given to them at the entrance.

    Sayyida Ruqayya Mosque
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    Sayyida Ruqayya Mosque

    by Sambawalk Updated Feb 12, 2005

    It was described that if they built mosques in Las Vegas, this is what they'd look like. In my opinion, it is. You can't believe until you see it in person for the decorations and mirrors inside the mosques which creates the reflections and sparkles.

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