Unique Places in Aleppo

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Robin020
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Robin020
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Robin020

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Aleppo

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    Explore the Kurdish region of Syria go to Afrin

    by Robin020 Updated Jan 31, 2012

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    While you are in Aleppo I would recommend to make use of your stay there and visit the Kurdish region of Syria,in order to learn more and know more about other part of Syria and how people live Kurdish are NOT Arbs or Turks They speak differnt language and They have different culture and tradition defintly worth and visit.

    Kurds in Syria are still behind times when it comes to civilization etc.
    But something very remarkable about them is They are every generous,hospitable,helpfull and friendly.
    It is definitely worth a visit to know more about simple people and their life and kindness.
    P.S Afrin is less than 35min drive from Aleppo and ticket costs less than 0,50 UK pounds by minibus (Van).

    You can pick the van from garag afrin in Aleppo.Even if you can find accommodation I am almost sure one of the people will host you...for free of cours :-)

    Afrin The Kurdish city in Syria (Souria)

    عفرين Afrin

    In Ottoman Age, Afrin city was a shelter for passengers and their animals; it was near the roman bridge..
    Afrin city has a population of nearly 80,000 people to the census for 6 towns. But Afrin region has a population of about 450,000 people according to the documents of civil affairs in the late 2000.
    As to the name of Afrin, there are many stories about the origin of its name; some people make it pure Kurdish from ‘Ava riwen’ which means red impure water, others say it is from’’ Avrin’’ which means the flowing water. However, Afrin was first mentioned in the form of ‘Apre’ phonologically and semantically in Assyrian books..

    to see

    Ein Dara
    Kafer nibl
    SammaanCastle
    Ein Dara
    Barad

    for more info go to Afrin

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    Mud houses Beehive houses

    by Robin020 Written Jan 29, 2012

    May not occur to one that there is still mud houses in the countryside north of Syria refused the owners of these houses left, but they are not increasing in the limit considered adherent to the basics of life they have.
    Interesting scientific missions Brief mud houses of Aleppo and its quest to add to the list of heritage
    These homes and interact with the distinctive nature of the problem of scene and color yellow radioactive and Tarkan is a village in the rural villages of the most of Aleppo where there is this type of housing and the reason for their adherence to these simple homes.
    Modern accommodation which does not provide a benefit provided by houses of mud such as heat in winter and cool in summer

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    Qalaat Samaan: Dead Cities, Part IV

    by atufft Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The size of the ruins of San Simeon cruciform basilica merits additional images to conceptualize it's importance within the realm of early Christian architecture. Even now the lichen encrusted granite used to build this monument attracts pilgrims--this time mainly those interested in archeology. The Stylite order of Christian aseticism was found as late as the 19th century in Russia. The principles of San Simeon's teachings are more than I can present, but basically, by staying atop the column Simeon attempted to get closer to God. The Dead Cities tour continues with more on San Simeon in the next tips.

    San Simeon East Wing from Northwest San Simeon General View From Northeast San Simeon General View from Cloister Buildings San Simeon and Cloister Buildings San Simeon West Wing View to Boulder
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    • Archeology
    • Road Trip

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    Afrin River Valley Agriculture

    by atufft Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Afrin River flows though the Dead Cities region, providing irrigation for olive orchards and seasonal crops. The soil is a red color, and given that the region has been farmed from the dawn of time, it must be quite rich. The horse is still used in places to plow small farms, although we did find some larger mechanized farms on the richer soils near the river. Water wars between Turkey and Syria balance against Syria, which has faced droughts in many years. The roads between villages here are rarely paved. The region is home to a large Kurdish population. The last image here is a stray from the Dier Semaan collection showing the ruins of the entrance arch.

    Afrin River View Horse Plow in Afrin River Valley area Road between Dier Semaan and Ain Dara Olive Orchard uphill from Afrin River Valley Area Remains of Entrance Arch at Dier Semaan
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    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture
    • Farm Stay

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    Ain Dara: Dead Cities, Part IX

    by atufft Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Although Syrian ruins date very early in many places in the country, the Aramean and Hittite ruins as Ain Dara are older than any I had seen outside of Egypt. The Hittites were iron weapon bearing tribes that conquered south from Anatolia before 1300BC when the Arameans had began building this temple. Thus, the influence of Hittite culture in the black basalt stone is evident. Ain Dara then is very old, belonging to the late bronze and early iron age cultures, of which there are few in the world still evident. Ain Dara apparently was more than the temple that we viewed, as this location also supported an entire city until Roman times. The actual building plan itself is thoroughly Semitic and has been used as a model for reconstructions of the conjectural Solomonic temple in Jerusalem. It is believed that this temple was a site for worship of the God Ishtar.

    Ain Dara Lion Body Ain Dara Lion Face Ain Dara Lions Ain Dara Steps Ain Dara Lion
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    • Archeology
    • Architecture
    • Road Trip

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    Sharia al-Tilal: a slice of daily Aleppine life

    by Tijavi Updated Feb 29, 2008

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    Just outside the Christian quarters of Al Jdeida, Sharia al-Tilal and its surrounding areas present yet another take on daily Aleppine life. True to Aleppo's image as a city of merchants (and consumers), the street is lined with shops catering mainly to local demand for clothes, fashion accessories and shoes. A walk along this road provides yet another glimpse of the Aleppine penchant for dressing well and looking good. I find the shops with half-basements as interesting, reminding me of their counterparts in Bangalore, India and in the Philippines, circa 1970s-80s.

    The area is also endowed with interesting colonial architecture, as well some old buildings sporting some Ottoman influence - again, reminders of the city's rich historical past.

    This interesting stretch of road is sandwiched by two of Aleppo's affluent neighborhoods - Al Jdeida and Al Azizieh. From Bab al-Faraj across the Sheraton hotel, take the main Sharia Al Tilal street just go with the flow of shoppers and cart-pushing deliverymen.

    Great architecture for the keen eye Remnants of Ottoman past with modern con Sh Tilal Basement shops are the norm Colorful bedroom footwear, China-made no doubt
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    Modern Aleppo

    by Tijavi Written Dec 22, 2007

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    As one of the world's oldest inhabited cities, Aleppo's historical tourism assets are just amazing (and many are said to remain undiscovered). If you're overwhelmed by the amount of historical attractions, try walking around the modern parts of the city to get a better feel of what everyday Syrian life is about - and to meet some of the friendliest people in the planet. You'd be surprised to know that many of them understand and speak English, and are always happy to take the time off for a short chat.

    A good place to wonder about is the shopping areas around Sharia Baron and Bab al-Faraj. Lined with shops selling mainly footwear and clothes, there are also interesting vignettes of modern Aleppine life like this very intriguing movie being shown in one of the cinemas (see picture - someone please translate). There is also a large open-air shopping plaza along Sharia Baron (I don't know the name of the place) with a beautiful modern mosque and an abstract steel sculpture with a fountain. It's a good place to have friendly chats with Aleppo's well-groomed and well-read locals.

    Cool shopping plaza with lovely mosque Abstract steel sculpture fountain Shops along Sh Baron Interesting movie poster Brisk business at night (it's only 6 PM!)
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    • Historical Travel

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    Communist-style war mural

    by iwys Updated Apr 21, 2007

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    From the days when Syria was a close ally of the Soviet Union, i.e. after Hafez al-Assad seized power in 1970 and implemented radical socialist policies.

    Even now, if you are pale complexioned, people in Aleppo, especially the taxi drivers will ask not, 'Where do you come from?' but 'Are you Russian?' They got so used to seeing Russian advisors working in the city.

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    Deir Samaan

    by iwys Updated Apr 21, 2007

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    Deir Samaan is a Dead City near Qalaat Samaan. Originally it was Greek farming settlement. Then in the 5th century it became a centre for pilgrims, visiting the nearby basilica, and a monastery was founded here. Deir Samaan means Monastery of Simeon. At its peak there would have been thousands of pilgrims here, staying in its hostels, attending its churches and shopping in its markets. Now a few farming families live amongst the ruins.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    Seit Aroum

    by iwys Updated Apr 21, 2007

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    Seit Aroum is one of several small Dead Cities west of Aleppo. Its main feature is a Byzantine church, which although roofless, looks quite impressive in this barren landscape. When I stopped there, a local shepherd who was sitting in the shade of the church, pointed out a small cross high up on its wall. I don't think I'd have noticed it otherwise.

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    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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    Al-Rafadah

    by iwys Updated Apr 21, 2007

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    Al-Rafadah is possibly my favourite of the Dead Cities, although Al Bara, with its pyramid tombs, runs it close. Al Rafadah has its Hermit Tower: a fortified lookout post, still in good condition.

    Just one old man now lives amongst the ruins now. His sandals made from an old tyre were on the doorstep of what had once been a grand Byzantine building. His home-made, wooden front door, with a plastic sheet for a window, stood between two Corinthian columns. You can climb up inside the Hermit's Tower to the lookout's balcony for a good view of the area.

    Al- Rafadah is about 20km west of Aleppo on the way to Qala'at Samaan.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

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    Al Heiat Mosque

    by iwys Updated Apr 21, 2007

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    Al Heiat Mosque, or the Snakes Mosque, gets its name from the fact that the stone carvings above the entrance look like snakes. The mosque, which is one of the oldest in Aleppo, was formerly a synagogue and before that, a temple. Inside there are many reminders of its past, including Roman columns and Hebrew inscriptions on the wall.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Mushabbaq Church

    by iwys Updated Apr 21, 2007

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    This is one of the nearest Byzantine churches to Aleppo. It was built in the late 5th century, probably as a stopping point on the pilgrimage route to St. Simeon. It is a peaceful, isolated place and you will probably find, as I did, that you are the only visitors there.

    It is 25km from Aleppo on the road to Qalaat Samaan.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

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    Qalb Lozeh

    by iwys Updated Apr 21, 2007

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    At Qalb Lozeh there is a Byzantine church which is even older than the basilica at Saint Simeon. It was built as a church fror pilgrims to pray at on there way to see Simeon on his pillar. It was built in 430 AD.

    It is west of Aleppo, just before the Turkish border.

    Admission: S£150

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    • Road Trip
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    Qatura

    by iwys Updated Apr 21, 2007

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    By the roadside at Qatura there are some cave tombs dating back to Roman times. Inside there are Latin and Greek inscriptions and rock carvings in the Palmyrene style. You need to clamber up onto a rock ledge to access the tombs, which are full of bat and goat droppings.

    In front of the tombs, there is a well with a basin next to it. While you are there, please pull the bucket up from the well, fill the basin and water the goats. They appreciate it, as it is hot and dry up there.

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    • Historical Travel
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Aleppo Hotels

See all 23 Hotels in Aleppo
  • Beit Salahieh Hotel

    The Beit Salahieh, is a lovely hotel (converted from a 15th century palace), which has panoramic...

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  • Sheraton Aleppo Hotel

    Try a breakfast in the Sheraton, all you wish to eat and more... And if you love ancient times,...

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  • Jdayde Hotel

    Jdayde Area, Alhatab Square, Aleppo, Syria

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Business

    Hotel Class 4 out of 5 stars

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Aleppo Off The Beaten Path

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