Citadel, Aleppo

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  • Citadel
    by Robin020
  • Citadel
    by Robin020
  • Citadel
    by Robin020
  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    The citadel

    by MalenaN Updated Sep 25, 2004

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    The entrance to the citadel
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    Inside the Citadel there is a lot of rubble and ruins. Here you can see the Royal Palace, Mosque of Abraham, Great Mosque, Hammam of Nour ad-Deen, a concrete amphitheatre, a café and a small museum.

    Don’t miss the throne room (I almost did), which was built by the Mamluks. The room has a painted wooden ceiling, a floor with patterns made of marble in different colours.

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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    The citadel

    by MalenaN Updated Sep 25, 2004

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    The entry bridge
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    To enter the Citadel you first pass through an outer defensive tower and then walk up the steps of the entry bridge to an impressive portal in the monumental gateway.

    It was not easy for enemies to conquer the citadel. When they came up the bridge people in the monumental gateway could pour down boiling oil over them and meet them with a rain of arrows.

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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    The citadel

    by MalenaN Updated Sep 25, 2004

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    The citadel on a hill
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    The Citadel of Aleppo can be seen from far away as it is built on a 50 metre high mound. The mound is a natural hill even though it doesn’t look like that.

    For a long time the mound was a place fro worship and religion, but in the 10th century the hill started to be fortified. During the time of the crusaders the citadel was strengthened and it was an important point for the Muslims.

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  • chrisvandenbroucke's Profile Photo

    Aleppo, the citadel

    by chrisvandenbroucke Written Mar 21, 2004

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    Aleppo, the Citadel

    Another view on the citadel.

    (Syria's second city, 350 km from Damascus. Aleppo is famous for its 13th century magnificent citadel and is one the world's oldest inhabitated cities.
    The town was in the center of commercilalpower for ages.)

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  • chrisvandenbroucke's Profile Photo

    Aleppo, the citadel

    by chrisvandenbroucke Written Mar 21, 2004

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    Aleppo, the Citadel

    View on the citadel from one side.

    (Syria's second city, 350 km from Damascus. Aleppo is famous for its 13th century magnificent citadel and is one the world's oldest inhabitated cities.
    The town was in the center of commercilalpower for ages.)

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  • chrisvandenbroucke's Profile Photo

    Aleppo, the citadel

    by chrisvandenbroucke Written Mar 21, 2004

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Aleppo, the Citadel

    The entrance of the citadel is a splendid example of Moorish architecture

    (Syria's second city, 350 km from Damascus. Aleppo is famous for its 13th century magnificent citadel and is one the world's oldest inhabitated cities.
    The town was in the center of commercilalpower for ages.)

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Aleppo Citadel

    by maykal Written Oct 30, 2003

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    Aleppo's Citadel

    The main sight in Aleppo is the huge citadel which lies atop a muddy pile of earth slap bang in the centre of the city. You can't fail to miss it, as it dominates the skyline. The entrance is probably the most impressive part, with its bridge and gatehouse stretching across the empty moat. Inside, there is an amphitheatre, a hammam, a mosque, and most importantly, a cafe to escape the rain if you happen to be unlucky like me. The views from the walls would have been nice if only the clouds had drifted elsewhere and the fog lifted!

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  • albateh's Profile Photo

    The Citadel

    by albateh Written Aug 27, 2003

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    But such grim efficiency did not preclude decoration and reminders of the presence of God. The nail-heads on the doors themselves beautifully worked, the lintels have comic or enigmatic carvings on them - intertwined serpents, a pair of lions confronting one another, one smiling the other weeping, and above all there are the fine Kufic inscriptions calling upon the power and the mercy of Allah. The interior of the Citadel shows all too clearly how it has been ravaged by enemies (the Mongols invaded it twice) and shattered by earthquakes (that of 1822 was particularly devastating).

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  • albateh's Profile Photo

    The Tower

    by albateh Updated Aug 27, 2003

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    On the north and south sides' great moat, some 20 meters deep and 30meters wide emphasize the proud isolation of the whole fortress. This impression has been rather spoiled by the planting of a clump of trees right in front of the entrance gate. A steeply rising bridge, supported by slender arches, leads across the moat from an entrance tower on the lower side to the great and forbidding entrance fortifications above. These are both austerely beautiful and full of ingenious defensive devices which strike even a 20th-century visitor as sophisticated. Five great iron-plated doors - each set at a corner of the passageway - could be closed to trap invaders under a hail of arrows, fire and boiling oil (used in these parts since ancient times) from the lookout places, arrow-slits and machicolations above.

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  • albateh's Profile Photo

    The Citadel.

    by albateh Updated Aug 27, 2003

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    Abraham is said to have camped on this hill and milked his red cow there on his journey from URA to Hauran. But from even earlier the remains of more ancient civilizations have raised the level of this acropolis beneath which so many bloody events have taken place. Fifty meters above the city a ring of crenellated walls and towers rises from a steep glacis, encircling a mass of ruins of every period.

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  • fouads's Profile Photo

    Visit Aleppo Citadel

    by fouads Updated Aug 12, 2003

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    Aleppo Citadel , it,s from the important and famous things here because it,s so old and so big about 1km diemeter .
    in the past Aleppo people use it before at the war when is some army came so they inter all in it and it,s include every thing need it ,

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  • dabuwan's Profile Photo

    City view from the Citadel

    by dabuwan Written Feb 18, 2003

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    City view from the Citadel

    As the Citadel is set on top of a hill right in the center of the city, you can enjoy very good views on whole Aleppo.
    There is usually a bit of breeze, but the sun can make it really hot anyway.
    To reach the Citadel you can walk upwards through the souk; you'll loose your way several times (and that is a real pleasure) but you'll find your way easily.

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  • dabuwan's Profile Photo

    The Citadel: metal doors

    by dabuwan Written Feb 18, 2003

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    An old metal door in the Citadel

    Inside the Citadel there are still some old metal doors. It's amazing how stout they are; they look like they will still be there for centuries. Examining them from close you can clearly see the way they have been built.

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  • dabuwan's Profile Photo

    The Citadel (2)

    by dabuwan Updated Feb 18, 2003

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    The Citadel

    It is a military building, but there are some nice decorations on the stones. The architecture of the whole complex is very solid. The outer walls and the bastions look still unassailable and I enjoyed wandering inside the whole day, discovering many interesting and picturesque corners.

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  • dabuwan's Profile Photo

    The Citadel (1)

    by dabuwan Written Feb 18, 2003

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    Entrance to the Citadel

    Aleppo Citadel is a big medieval fortress that stands on top of a hill overlooking the city.
    The whole complex is surrounded by a large, deep moat and the fortified entrance is really majestic.
    The citadel dates back to the 13th century and, though ruined in some parts, it is still a massive buiding, very interesting to visit.

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