Palmyra Transportation

  • Qal'at Ash Shmemis
    Qal'at Ash Shmemis
    by June.b
  • Beehive mudhouses of Sarouj
    Beehive mudhouses of Sarouj
    by June.b
  • Transportation
    by June.b

Most Recent Transportation in Palmyra

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    Group Tour - Palmyra

    by June.b Written Nov 27, 2010
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    Although it's a bit costly - i was really intending to do it on my own - but the group tour in a van is convenient. I paid SYP2,500 or $55 at Riad Hotel who arranges the van and enlist people on the tour. I know I could have spent even half of that but well, I felt awkward asking and refusing. It was ok anyway, the driver was kind - albeit no english so I have to communicate with him with my basic arabic and relay all his messages to the group. The hotel did not tell us that - or maybe because I didn't ask - I was thinking there would be an english-speaking guide or sumthin'.

    We left the hotel at 7:15am with a stopover at Qal'at Ash Shmemis along the way and the beehive houses village of Sarouj before heading to Palmyra and came back to Hama at night time already. In reality it was just a service van with a driver. For people into convenience, I would still recommend it though.

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  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Group Tour

    by June.b Written Nov 27, 2010
    Gateway of Palmyra
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    Although it's a bit costly - i was really intending to do it on my own - but the group tour in a van is convenient. I paid SYP2,500 or $55 at Riad Hotel who arranges the van and enlist people on the tour. I know I could have spent even half of that but well, I felt awkward asking and refusing. It was ok anyway, the driver was kind - albeit no english so I have to communicate with him with my basic arabic and relay all his messages to the group. The hotel did not tell us that, I was thinking there would be an english guide or sumthin'.

    We left the hotel at 7:15am with a stopover at Qal'at Ash Shmemis along the way and the beehive houses village of Sarouj before heading to Palmyra. In reality it was a driver and a van.

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    Travel by Bus

    by PierreZA Written Apr 17, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Busses depart from this shop

    Traveling by Bus is Syria is a pleasure. There is more than one Bus Stop (not station). I arrived from Hama (via Homs), and left from Palmyra to Damascus.

    The driver took me to the bus stop from where the next bus was to depart from next. It is very affordable and comfortable to travel by these air conditioned buses.

    Several Bus Companies offer services to and from Palmyra. It is not necessary to book ahead.

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    VIP coach to Damascus

    by hydronetta Written Oct 25, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We were adviced by our hotel manager in Palmyra to use the option of a VIP bus service to drive from Palmyra to Damascus. Indeed it was an excellent choice.
    The bus was extremely comfortable (just 3 seats in a row meaning you had more space), LCD overhead TV playing an arab film (if you're fluent in arabic) and also bottles of water were served.
    By western stands the ticket was inexpensive. Compared to other services more expensive of course. But it's worth the effort.
    I can't give full details of the bus company as their bussiness card is in arabic, but they're called Al Arabia Tours VIP and I think their phone number in Damascus is 4532122-4532120 (if I can read the arab letters properly!!)

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    Getting to Palmyra

    by MM212 Updated Apr 7, 2008

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    Palmyra is located in the middle of the Great Syrian Desert, far away from civilisation. It is connected to major Syrian cities with two lane desert roads. There is no airport, nor train to get you there. While there are buses and tours that reach Palmyra, my travel companions and I had rented a car and drove it ourselves around Syria. It was certainly adventurous, particularly driving in the dark to Palmyra. If you choose to do this, make sure you have a good road map. A better alternative would be to hire a car with a driver to take you there, which is not too expensive in Syria.

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  • JohnniOmani's Profile Photo

    Bus to Palmyra

    by JohnniOmani Written May 10, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you plan on going to Palmyra which most people do then dont waste your time and get a taxi etc. You can get to the site for less than $2 US no matter what anybody says to you. Believe it, cheaper and interesting, it was one of the most interesting bus journeys to date with a bus load of military personnel. Good Fun.

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    Motortrikes Around Town

    by atufft Written Mar 22, 2006

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    Multicolored Trike in Palmyra
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    Palmyra is a very small town and can be easily hiked within a few minutes. We dragged our wheeled luggage down the street toward the bus. If one needs a ride though, these interesting motorized multicolored trikes were around town waiting to be used.

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    Bicycles Around Palmyra

    by atufft Written Mar 22, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bicycles in Palmyra

    We didn't rent one, but I noticed that bicycles could be rented in town. They won't work for getting around the ruins, but it might work to get over to the water spring, which we didn't have time to see.

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  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Bus from/to Damascus/Hama

    by atufft Written Mar 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chose Seats Near the Driver's
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    Your hotel or taxi driver can help you find the bus station on the east side of Damascus where the buses for Palmyra depart. We took this trip in the evening and arrived very late at night, but were nevertheless able to get a decent hotel room. At the Damascus station, we were spooked by a well dressed fellow who was determined to help us out. He was friendly, but I think he may have been a secret police person making sure that we were OK for both the government and our trip. The bus going east was large and comfortable. During the return trip, we took a much smaller bus or large van. I can't recall the prices for either of these, but I do recall that prices were surprisingly low--probably about $1 per hour of travel or there about. Our destination upon leaving Palmyra was Allepo, so we had to make a change in vans at Hama. Hama appears to be a major transportation junction for these small vans as the station was very busy late into the night. None of these trips was more than several hours, so it's possible to travel anywhere within Syria within a day if necessary. We had looked into taking the alternate route from Palmyra to Allepo via the Euphrates river, but this would have required either a lot more time or a private 4wd vehicle. This route is recommended though if one has the time as there are several significant archeological ruins enroute.

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    Bus from Damascus to Palmyra (Tadmor)

    by Janani Written Feb 7, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Buses to Palmyra leave Damascus from the Harasta station, just outside the city. I reached it using a taxi, which was not too expensive. The luggage was all scanned before passengers entered the station, using an airport style X-ray machine. Then I found the ticket office where I had to present my passport in order to purchase a ticket for about 130 Syrian pounds. Luckily I got a place on the next bus, which was due to leave ten minutes later from a bay to the rear of the ticket office. There were plenty of shops here selling drinks and snacks for the journey.

    Our cases were stored in a separate compartment under the seating area and everyone sat in their allocated numbered seats.

    I really enjoyed the four hour journey, as everyone seemed very friendly, especially a young couple with a small child in front of me that kept bobbing up and down to try to surprise me. Her parents offered me some coffee and I shared my biscuits with them. The bus company also provided some water for each passenger.

    The sun was very strong that day, so we needed the curtains pulled across during the journey but, peeking out between them I saw mostly desert areas with military bases and twice I saw a train running along tracks in the same direction as us, which I later discovered was carrying petrol rather than passengers. We arrived at the edge of Palmyra in good time, where we found plenty of taxi drivers, all eager for our custom.

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    Fancy Scooter...

    by coceng Written Jun 12, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fancy Scooter in Palmyra...

    I captured this photo at night. This fancy scooter is a mode of transportation especially moving around the places around Palmyra & also to & from The Arab Castle.
    No, you can't ride it yourself but a driver will ride it for you ! I took it from The Arab Castle back to Palmyra New Town, rather back to my hotel a few hours earlier.

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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    From Hamah to Tadmor

    by MalenaN Written Apr 15, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Palmyra

    Going to Palmyra from Hamah I first took a microbus from Hamah to Homs. The microbus station in Hamah is about 1 km away from Cairo Hotel where I stayed. At the station the ticket could not be bought on the bus but at an office next to the bus. To Homs the price was less than 20 SP. It took less than an hour to Homs, where the bus stopped just outside the big bus station. One of the passengers showed me the way to the bus to Palmyra (Tadmor) in the far end of the station. The bus to Tadmor was leaving 1,5 hours later. I bought a ticket for 50 SP and waited. I had a very nice time waiting at the station. I got some tea and the sous seller gave me a cool tamarind drink (he did not want to have any money). A woman going with the same bus as me got water from me and she gave me an ice cream. People were very kind and curious. The Tadmor bus was an old bus with curtains and decorations, and it took a few hours (maybe less) going to Tadmore. In Tadmore I left the bus close to Hotel Balshamin, where I was going to stay.

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    From Tadmor to Damascus

    by MalenaN Updated Apr 15, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The road to Damascus

    The road to Damascus is going right through the area of ruins.

    In Tadmor (Palmyra) Karnak Bus Company has an office just opposite the museum. They have a few air-conditioned buses a day to Damascus for 110 SP (July 2002). When I was going we were not many people leaving for Damascus and the bus was almost empty, but somewhere along the desert road to Damascus the bus stopped and we had to change buses. I guess it was the bus from Deir ez-Zur catching up with us. After 4 – 5 hours the bus reached Harasta Terminal, several kilometres outside Damascus City centre. At Harasta the taxi drivers were eager to drive us downtown (we were a few foreigners coming with the bus) for quite a lot of money. Someone showed us the minibus going to Sharia Choukri al-Quwatli and we took that one instead.

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  • aqazi's Profile Photo

    Transportation in Palmyra

    by aqazi Written Sep 6, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Buses come and go to and from Palmyra from Damascus and Homs. Unfortunatly I don't think there are direct services to Hama or Allepo. For these distinations just jump on the minibus to Homs. When you get to Homs station there are plenty of people waiting to take you on your onward journey. It's easy peasy, like everywhere else in Syria everyone will be only too pleased to help you.

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    going off the beaten path

    by call_me_rhia Written Jan 8, 2003

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    a syrian taxi, not in Palmyra

    To get our of the beaten path, namely to the Valley of Tombs or to the Arab fortress on top of the hill in the distance, the only way to get around (unless you want to talk for hours) is to hire a taxi. If you ask the hotel where you are staying they'll organise it for you, but failing this there are some touts hanging about in the streets (especially in the morning) offering to take you around. As a reference (dec 2002) I paid 10 $ to go out to the valley of the tombs, then on to the temple of bel and finally finishing off at the arab fortress.

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