Amasya Favorites

  • an extraordinary travel to past.
    an extraordinary travel to past.
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Most Recent Favorites in Amasya

  • voyageur2's Profile Photo

    Time to discover the past of Amasya.

    by voyageur2 Written Jan 11, 2013

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    Favorite thing: Amasya has a rich past. It was always called with famous statesmen during the ages. Pontian kings and Ottoman princes are among them. City museum is an important point of interest for a breeze of history and local culture.

    Fondest memory: Museum of mummies.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    Other interesting places to visit

    by traveloturc Written Jun 19, 2009
    King Tombs

    Favorite thing: The city also has many historically and architecturally precious buildings; the Ferhat water channel, the 13th-century Seljuk Burmali Mosque, the 15th-century Yildirim Beyazit Mosque and Complex; the 14th-century Ilhanli Bimarhane Mental Hospital with lovely reliefs around its portal, the extraordinary octagonal Kapi Aga Medrese, the Torumtay Mousoleum and the Gok Medrese.

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    The City Where Everything Started...

    by Pinat Written Jun 12, 2009

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    Favorite thing: In 1919 Amasya was the location of the final planning meetings held by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk for the building of a Turkish army to establish the Turkish republic following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire at the end of the First World War. It was here that Mustafa Kemal made the announcement of the Turkish War of Independence with the famous Amasya Circular.

    Amasya Circular was a joint circular by Mustafa Kemal Pasha, Rauf Orbay, Refet Bele and Ali Fuat Cebesoy, also approved by Kazim Karabekir, that is considered as the first written document putting the Turkish War of Independence. The circular, distributed across Anatolia , declared Turkey's independence and integrity to be in danger and called for a national conference to be held in Sivas(Sivas Congress) and before that, for a preparatory congress comprising representatives from the eastern provinces of Anatolia to be held in Erzurum.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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  • Pinat's Profile Photo

    Amasya Houses

    by Pinat Written Jun 11, 2009

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    Favorite thing: The examples of traditional Amasya houses seen in several places in the city, mostly built in the 19th century, especially along the river Yesilirmak, form an important group among Amasya’s architectural constructions.

    These houses are generally side-by-side, terraced houses. Yaliboyu Houses represent the most beautiful examples of them. On the coast of the Yesilirmak are these houses, built on the historical ramparts of the castle with sun-dried bricks. They carry all the features of traditional Ottoman houses and are in harmony with Amasya’s historical identity.

    These houses are built on basements as one or two-storey buildings. They usually have courtyards and gardens. The garden is in the middle, and the rooms are divided as male and female rooms. The inner part of the house is closed to passer-bys. This state of being closed in other buildings is sometimes made with high garden walls.

    Daily life is spent inside the rooms called sofas. In these rooms are generally fireplace, anything used for making drinks such as tea, coffee or sherbet (a Turkish traditional sweet drink), built-in cupboards, shelves and platform used as a sofa. Besides these things, there are not any baths in most of the houses except a few ones. In that case, built-in cupboards are used for that purpose. All these units inside the rooms are indispensable parts of the daily life.

    Apart from the units inside the houses, there are some units , necessary for daily life in the garden and in the courtyard. Among these are water-wells and furnaces. In some examples, there are also ovens in order to bake bread.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography

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  • Pinat's Profile Photo

    Every Nation of the Empire Was Represented Once

    by Pinat Written Jun 11, 2009

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    Favorite thing: The population of Amasya at Ottoman time was very different from that of most other cities in the Empire; as it was part of the training for the future sultans to learn about every nation of the Empire.

    Every nation of the Empire was represented in Amasya in a particular village -- such as a Pontic village, an Armenian village, a Bosnian village, a Tatar village, a Turkish village, an Arab village, a Kurdish village, etc.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    The City of Crown Princes

    by Pinat Written Jun 11, 2009

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    Favorite thing: After being incorporated into the Ottoman Empire under Sultan Bayezid I, Amasya became an important center for learning. As part of preparation for their future rule, Ottoman princes were given the position and responsibility of governor of Amasya. Future sultans from Bayezid I in the 14th century to Murat III in the 16th century were schooled here.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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Amasya Favorites

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