Amasya Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by June.b
  • Bimarhane
    Bimarhane
    by traveloturc
  • Things to Do
    by voyageur2

Most Recent Things to Do in Amasya

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Beyazid Pasha Mosque

    by June.b Written Jul 19, 2011
    4 more images

    Beside the Kumacik Hammam is the Beyazid Pasha Mosque.

    Just beside the Kumacik Hammam which is right at the foot of Kunc Bridge is the Beyazir Mosque.

    Built in 1414 by Beyazid Pasha on the east side of Yesilirmak, across the Kunc Bridge in Bayezid Paºa District. Built in the Brusa tradition, the mosque has six square pillars in the portico joined together to create 5 departments with each a dome supported by octagonal socles ornamented with Turkish triangles.

    There’s a sardivan (fountain) right infront of the mosque’s entrance, which is almost similar in design from the one in Beyazid II Kulliyesi, and in Konya's Mevlana Museum.

    The mosque is situated in a residential area, a bit far from the bustle of the centrum.

    The mosque was restored in 2006.

    That ended my walking tour in one day. Squeezed a lot of stuff in one day because I only have 2 full days in Amasya. And I was planning on going up the castle -- hiking - the following day, hesitant but I did! So keep on reading ....

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Backpacking
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Kumacik Hammam

    by June.b Written Jul 19, 2011
    2 more images

    Crossing the Kunc Kuprusu opposite it is the Kumacik Hammam.

    This hammam (turkish public bath) is commissioned by the chief white eunuch Ayas Aga the and built in 1436 in Beyazid Paºa District.

    It is a traditional Ottoman architecture, the hammam is made with broken stones. Just like most hammam (or all), it has a cooling room, a warm and a hot room. The dressing room is square shaped and roofed with a large dome decorated with Turkish triangles.

    Beside the hammam is the Beyazid Pasha Mosque, that's the next stop......next tip...

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Burmali Minare Mosque and Cumudar Tomb

    by June.b Updated Jul 19, 2011
    3 more images

    Above the Tashan is a selcuk mosque and on its arch shaped epigraph on the entrance read (translated in English):

    “Constructed during the rule of Sultan Giyasettin Keyhusrev II by the Vizier Ferruh and his brother and finance minister Haznedar yusuf between 1237 – 1244. Built as a classical Seljuk “ulu” mosque plan style. The minaret was built as the 17th century style spiral and twisted cut stones were used in its construction.”

    The minaret, damaged by the earthquake in 1590 and the fire in 1602, was totally burnt down in the fire of 1730, and rebuilt again.

    On sides of the entrance is the minaret on the right and on the left is the octagonal Cumudar Tomb housing the mummy of of Shahzadah Cumudar, who ministered Anatolia from Amasya during the reign of Ilhanlilar.

    The mummy of Cumudar was moved to the Amasya Museum, and the tomb which was named after him actually belongs to Ferruh Bey and his son.

    Next stop, Bedestan of Amasya, just near the Tashan....

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Waterfalls near Kunc Kuprusu

    by June.b Updated Jul 19, 2011
    2 more images

    From Gumuslu Mosque I walked back to the town square and to Saat Kulesi or Clock Tower, then I walked the long street at the back of the clock tower called Elmasiye Caddesi up to the highway and just before reaching the Kunc Kuprusu (bridge) and the Buyuk Aga Medresesi, I found the waterfalls on the side of the mountain on my left.

    Am not sure though if it's a natural waterfall or somehow rechanneled water flow. There is a small park beside it and some benches to rest. So I did rest for awhile.

    The continue my walking tour to the Buyuk Aga Medresesi which is few steps from the waterfalls, that's the next stop...go now to the next tip.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Sarayduzu Regimental Quarters

    by June.b Written Jul 19, 2011
    3 more images

    The original location of the Sarayduzu Regimental Quarters, built as the central military post of the Sanjak of Amasya with the intent to ensure domestic safety, is marked by the flagpole seen as you raise your head and look at the skirt of the mountain.

    The Sarayduzu is the historical building where Kemal Ataturk and the accompanying delegation resided between June 12 to 26, 1919, and where Amasya Circular based on the motto “ The future of the people will be saved by their own resolution and determination” was penned and announced to the whole world, kindling the torch of the Turkish War of Independence after a thorough analysis of both domestic and international circumstances.

    The original building was first partially, then entirely demolished by the landslides in 1935 and 1944. As the original spot is still prone to landslide, the building has been rebuilt in its present location in order to commemorate its significance in the history of the Turkish War of Independence. Reconstruction was funded by the Ministry of Culture & Tourism and completed in 6 months through the efforts of the Governorship of Amasya. Opened in January 27, 2007.

    The building is used both as a museum housing certain documents and works belonging to the Republican Period and a culture center with its exhibition and meeting halls and the amphitheater.

    Near the Sarayduzu is the Kunc Bridge which is the next tip....

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Five bridges of Amasya

    by June.b Updated Jul 19, 2011
    4 more images

    The Pontic tombs are on the noth bank of the Yesilirmak River while most of the commercial activities are located on the more populated south bank.

    The two sides are connected by 5 bridges, some of them are lovely wooden bridges enforced by concrete bases.

    For sure you'll cross a minimum of 2 of these bridges, one from the Clock Tower called Hukumet Bridge.

    So go now to the next stop -- the Clock Tower.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    The view of the town from the Pontic Tombs

    by June.b Updated Jul 19, 2011
    4 more images

    What an amazing view of the town if you're standing at the pontic tomb and even from the hanging restaurant just below the tombs. Really refreshing - red roofings, the flowing yesilirmak river, the mountains on the other side, it's a view that surely will inspire you to paint. Bad thing I don't know how to paint. I'm not an artist per se, just know how to appreciate one.

    I went down and found a small ruin below called Kizlar Sarayi (Girls Palace) , the next stop.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Kizlar Sarayi

    by June.b Updated Jul 19, 2011
    4 more images

    Kizlar Sarayi or Girls Palace is below the caves above the inner castle. It was built when Dograk Hatun, daughter of the Governor of Sinop visited Amasya.

    Once it was completed Isfendiyar Lords used Amasya as a military base and stayed at this palace during their campaigns.

    Kizlar Sarayi served Ottoman shahzades, ladies and governors for over 150 years. It was still in use by1852.

    Go to the next stop...tip...

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Kunc Kuprusu

    by June.b Updated Jul 19, 2011
    2 more images

    From the Sarayduzu Regimental Quarters I walked along the concrete bridge called Kunc Kuprusu.

    This bridge connecs Beyazýtpasha and Shamlar Districts, and is an example of late Seljuk period work. It was built in the 13th century, commissioned either by the daughter or Hondi Hatun, the mother of Sultan Mesud II.

    Some of the stones used in the construction of the one in the middle appear to belong to a sarcophagus of uncertain origin.

    The bridge is believed to have been named after Hundi (or Hondi) Hatun. The name pronounced as Kundi, is believed to have changed in time to Kunc.

    Crossing the bridge I ended up to the Kumacik Hammam which is the opposite end of the bridge, that's the next tip....go now.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Buyuk Aga Medresesi

    by June.b Written Jul 19, 2011
    2 more images

    From the clock tower, I walked at the back along the very long Elmasiye Street upto the highway passing by the waterfalls and few steps is the Buyuk Aga Medresesi (Islamic School that teaches the Holy Qur'an).

    Built in 1448 by Huseyin Aga, eunuch of Sultan Beyazid II, the Medresa of Buyuk Aga is the first example of the octagonal design which is typical design of Seljuk tombs or mausoleum.

    The entrance is through a large arched gateway on the northeast corner. Just beyond the entrance, there is a hall with rectangular niches on both sides. The octagonal inner courtyard is surrounded by a portico created by lancet arches built on four pillars on each side. Bursa school applied in the arches of this courtyard complements its unique beauty.

    The vaulted cloisters of this portico constitute the antechambers of the students’ cells. Each cell has a rectangular, marble framed window and a dome with an octagonal drum. On the southern side, there is a larger chamber with a higher dome than the rest of the chambers which is used both as a classroom and a masjid.

    The walls of the building are built of broken stone and brick. The intervals between the lines of three rows of bricks are masoned with broken stones.

    After this medrese, almost beside it along the Yesilirmak River is the recently constructed or reconstructed Sarayduzu Regimental Quarters.............. read that on the next tip.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Backpacking
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Gumuslu Mosque

    by June.b Written Jul 19, 2011
    1 more image

    Opposite the Hukumet Bridge and beside the town square is the Gumushlu Mosque, built on a slight ridge overlooking Yavuz Selim Square which makes it look grander than it really is.

    Built in 1326 by Taceddin Mahmud Celebi, the wooden roofed building collapsed during the earthquake in 1419. Rebuilt in 1491 Defterdar Mahmut Bey. Damaged during the fire of 1612 hence repaired by Shemseddin Pasha. Another repair work was done in 1688 by Gumushluzade Ýbrahim Bey and eventually named after him. Gutted by fire in 1721 and repaired by the trustee of the foundation Mustafa Aga.

    Next stop is the waterfalls...go to the next tip.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Bedestan of Amasya

    by June.b Updated Jul 19, 2011

    Continuing my walk from the archeological museum along Mustafa Kemal Pasha Street to Tashan to the Burmali Mosque, I went down the stairs on the right side ending back to the main Mustafa Kemal Pasha Street and just in front of the Tashan is a covered bazaar which is obviously under restoration - the Bedestan of Amasya.

    The Bedesten or covered bazaar of Amasya is commissioned by Huseyin Aga, one of Beyazid II's eunuchs and built to fund charity missions of Huseyin Aga.

    It was severely damaged by the earthquake of 1688. it was neglected for a long but restoration went on in 1865 but things didn't work out with this improvement works - roof did not last long and neglected again.

    In 1971, restoration work started by the General Directorate of Charitable Foundations. After this extensive restoration work, the ancient walls which were neglected for over 500 years but still managed to remain in tact came back to life and the bazaar became a domed structure again notwithstanding the reduction in the number of the domes.

    Took my lunch and continue walking back to the town square still along Mustafa Kemal Pasha Street and at the town square is the Gumuslu Mosque just after the square, beside it actually, that's the next stop....

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    The Tashan

    by June.b Updated Jul 19, 2011
    4 more images

    Walking from the Amasya Museum of Archeology I continued walking along the Mustafa Kemal Pasha Street and about 7 blocks, I found this ruined structure that looked like it has been there abandoned for centuries. Grasses growing on its walls and the entire roof.

    It's the Tashan. I thought it doesn't have a story, though of course with my wild imagination sometimes (or most of the time) I know it has and even if it doesn't have, am gonna make it a story.

    Commisioned by Gov. Rahtuvan Haci Mehmet Pasha and built in 1758 by Architect Mehmet Kalfa.

    The epigraph of the inn is in a rectangular frame over the main entrance, 2 handcarved badges in the building, one in the epigraph and the other one is on the keyblock of the arch of the door.

    The shops are aligned on both sides of the entrance and the inside patio is surrounded by various shops. The second floor that I thought was just a roofing is in poor condition and almost the entire floor is covered with growing grasses.

    Still you can find active shops in the Tashan, and some cars used the arched openings on the other side as parking lots. (see pics on the right).

    Walk up the stairs going up as you can see is the towering twisted minaret of Burmali Mosque just at the back of the Tashan, go to the next tip ...

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Stoneworks at the Garden of the Archeological Muze

    by June.b Updated Jul 19, 2011
    4 more images

    After exiting the archeological museum, there's a gate to your left side that opens up to a garden.

    The garden display stoneworks belonging to the Hittite, the Hellenistic, the Roman, the Byzantine, the Ilkhanate, the Seljuk and the Ottoman periods.

    There are several columns and sarcophagi scattered on the grass lawn and an old structure at the end of the lawn that looks like a mausoleum.

    Continue walking along Mustafa Kemal Pasha Street, from the museum to your right side of the road, to the Tashan...go to the next tip for that.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Bayezid Kulliyesi

    by June.b Updated Jul 19, 2011
    Beyzid II Mosque
    4 more images

    About 4 blocks away from Sarachane Mosque along the Ziya Pasha Blvd and -

    At the southern end of the Madenus Koprusu (bridge) is the large mosque and madrasa complex in Amasya - the Kulliyah of Beyazid II.

    Beyazid II Kulliyyah was commissioned by Shahzadah Ahmet, Governor of Amasya in the name of his father Sultan Beyazid II. The kulliyyah consist of a mosque, a medresseh, a mission and a fountain and was the work of Architect Semseddin Ahmet.

    The tomb annexed to the building later on belongs to Shahzadah Osman, Shahzadah Ahmet’s son who had died prematurely. The U-shape structure on the side of the mosque is the medrasah while the L-shape on the other side is the mission.

    The sycamore trees - including a huge one beside the mosque that I thought smells like burning incense - providing a shades in the garden of the mosque were planted during the construction of the mosque and been there for over 500 years.

    The beautiful dodecagonal fountain in the middle of the patio is covered by a dodecagonal pyramid supported by 12 pillars.

    Go now to the next stop - Amasya Archeological Museum - at the back few steps on the west or right side.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Amasya

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

74 travelers online now

Comments

Amasya Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Amasya things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Amasya sightseeing.

View all Amasya hotels