Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara

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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Civilizations Museum - GREAT!

    by solopes Updated Jan 13, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ankara - Turkey

    In a rather modern town, and after visiting the Ataturk Memorial, we were taken to the Civilizations Museum.

    I thought it was just another museum, to fulfill a couple of hours in a common city, with no many attractions, and I entered without any enthusiasm. The strike came absolutely by surprise.

    My God.

    There, lined in the long corridors, were the images that for long connected me to the early history of mankind. I never felt so touched in any other museum. Side by side, the original priceless carvings almost indistinguishable, and a replica, with all the details. And the old history passing by you. And the shame of the injustice of my original thoughts. This is not another museum. Wherever you were born, wherever you came from, no doubt.

    This is it. This is THE museum.

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    The Museum of Anatolian Civilizations

    by gulgundemirci Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Close to the citadel gate, an old bedesten has been beautifully restored and now houses a marvelous and unique collection including Paleolithic, Neolithic, Hatti, Hittite, Phrygian, Urartian, Roman works, and showpiece Lydian treasures. (Open every day, except Monday. During the summer, the museum opens everyday).

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Museum of Anatolian Civilisations

    by mvtouring Written Oct 21, 2009

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    Our first stop this morning was the Museum of Anatolian Civilisations . Situated on the hill with Ankara's ancient Citadel, not far from Ulus Square (Metro: Ulus) you will find it. This historic caravanserai holding artifacts from up to 7500 years, including the most extensive and valuable collection of Hittite artifacts in the world.

    The museum is open daily from 09:00 am to 17:00 (5 pm), closed Monday in winter.

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    Museum of Anatolian Civilisations

    by WulfstanTraveller Written Feb 18, 2009

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    Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara
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    This archeological museum, in Turkish the Anadolu Medeniyetleri Muzesi, is one of the main attractions in Ankara and in fact one of the best and most important archeological museums in the world. It was awarded the 1997 European Museum of the Year Award.

    Its value stems not merely from its extensive and impressive collection of artifacts - and indeed it possesses a very large volume of artifacts - but primarily from its wealth of pre-Hellenistic Anatolian artifacts. It is, in fact, by far the single most important museum in the world on the archealogy of Anatolia, which makes sense since it's in the middle of Anatolia in a city that has been in existance since at least the Hittite period.

    The museum includes artifacts from the Neolithic period and the settlement of Catal Hoyuk, roughly 9,000 years old, all the way up. It has impressive Phrygian artifacts as well. However, arguably the most impressive section is the Hittite section, especially the central hall, which is full of numerous Hittite large statues and reliefs, particularly from the Neo-Hittite period of city states that followed the collapse of the Hittite Empire. It includes some famous artifacts, including Hittite sphinx gate guards from Alaca Hoyuk, a large relief from the King's Gate in Hattusa, and early Hittite and Hatti bronzes.

    Finally, the museum is also noteworthy for the location itself, actually two 15-century Ottoman buildings. These are a bedesten and kervansaray or han, commercial buildings for trade built during the reign of Fatih Mehmet II (Mehmet the Conqueror).

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  • Tuna_ank's Profile Photo

    Anatolian civilizations museum

    by Tuna_ank Updated Oct 19, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    "Anadolu medeniyetleri müzesi" is the best museum in Turkey and very important archeological museum for Europe.

    http://64.233.183.104/search?q=cache:45PnJUq9_vAJ:www.enformatik.ankara.edu.tr/muze/index1eng.htm+anatolian+civilization+museum&hl=tr&ct=clnk&cd=4&gl=tr

    http://www.anadolumedeniyetlerimuzesi.gov.tr/

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    Museum of Anatolian Civilizations

    by mindcrime Written Oct 18, 2008

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    I’ve been told that this is one of the best museums in Asia and this is true! The truth is that I was expecting a bigger collection but all the items are outstanding covering a various ancient civilizations of the area from the Paleolithic and Neolithic era to Hittites’ kingdom. So much history here! I found impressive the bull heads (pic 4) that had a ritual significance. They symbolized the man gods made of original bull skulls covered with plaster.

    60-70 minutes are enough to explore all the artifacts (and read the signs) and also to walk outside where you can see some more statues, big amphoreus(pic 5) etc
    I noticed a nice café inside, also a souvenir shop.

    The museum is opened daily 09.00 - 17.00 and the entrance fee is 10YTL (6 euros)

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    Museum of Anatolian Civilizations

    by serkanen Written Sep 21, 2008

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    The Museum of Anatolian Civilizations (Turkish: Anadolu Medeniyetleri Müzesi) is located on the south side of Ankara Castle in the Atpazarı area in Ankara, Turkey. It consists of the old Ottoman Mahmut Paşa bazaar storage building, and the Kurşunlu Han. Because of Atatürk's desire to establish a Hittite museum, the buildings were bought upon the suggestion of Hamit Zübeyir Koşay, who was then Culture Minister, to the National Education Minister, Saffet Arıkan. After the remodelling and repairs were completed (1938 -1968), the building was opened to the public as the Ankara Archaeological Museum. It is one of the richest museums in the world[citation needed].

    Today, Kurşunlu Han, used as an administrative building, houses the work rooms, library, conference hall, laboratory and workshop. The old bazaar building houses the exhibits. Within this Ottoman building, the museum has a number of exhibits of Anatolian archeology. They start with the Paleolithic era, and continue chronologically through the Neolithic, Early Bronze, Assyrian trading colonies, Hittite, Phrygian, Urartian, Greek, Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine, Seljuk and Ottoman periods. There is also an extensive collection of artifacts from the excavations at Karain, Çatalhöyük, Hacılar, Canhasan, Beyce Sultan, Alacahöyük, Kültepe, Acemhöyük, Boğazköy (Gordion), Pazarlı, Altıntepe, Adilcevaz and Patnos as well as examples of several periods.

    The exhibits of gold, silver, glass, marble and bronze works date back as far as the second half of the first millennium BC. The coin collections, with examples ranging from the first minted money to modern times, represent the museum's rare cultural treasures.

    Museum of Anatolian Civilizations reaching the present time with its historical buildings and its deeply rooted history was elected as the first "European Museum of the Year" in Switzerland on April 19, 1997.

    The history of the museum

    The first museum in Ankara was established by Mübarek Galip Bey, Directorate of Culture, in 1921, in the section of the Castle of Ankara called Akkale. In addition to this museum, artifacts from the Augustus Temple and the Byzantine Baths were also collected. Upon recommendation of Atatürk and from the view of establishing an "Eti Museum" in the center , the Hittite artifacts from the region were sent to Ankara and therefore a larger museum was needed.

    The Director of Culture at that time, Hamit Zübeyir Koşay and Saffet Arıkan, Minister of Education recommended that the Mahmut Paşa Bazaar and the Inn be repaired and converted into a museum. This recommendation was accepted and restoration continued from 1938 to 1968. Upon the completion of repairs of the bazaar, where the domed structure is, in 1940, a committee chaired by German Archaeologist H. G. Guterbock arranged the museum. For a more extensive discussion of Hans Guterbock's exile in Turkey and his saga in coming to the US from Turkey, see Turkey's Modernization: Refugees from Nazism and Atatürk's Vision by Arnold Reisman.

    In 1943, while the repairs of the building were still under progress, the middle section was opened for visitors. Repair projects of this part were carried out by Architect Macit Kural and repair work upon tender was performed by Architect Zühtü Bey. In 1948 the museum administration left Akkale as a storage house, and the museum was in four rooms of Kurşunlu Han the repairs of which were completed. Restoration and exhibition projects of the part around the domed structure were prepared and applied by Architect İhsan Kıygı. Five shops were left in their original form, and the walls between the shops were destroyed and thus a large location was provided for exhibition. The museum building reached its present structure in 1968. Kurşunlu Han, which has been used as an administration building, has research rooms, a library, a conference hall, a laboratory and workshops, and the Mahmut Pasha Vaulted Bazaar has been used as the exhibition hall.

    The Anatolian Civilizations Museum, being among exceptional museums with its unique collection, has Anatolian archaeological artefacts, artefacts from the Palaeolithic Age to the present are exhibited.

    History of buildings

    The Anatolian Civilizations Museum is in two Ottoman buildings located near Ankara Castle, in the historical Atpazarı district of Ankara. One of the buildings is Mahmut Paşa Bedesteni and the other is Kurşunlu Han.

    Bedesteni was built by Mahmut Pasha, one of ministers (viziers) of Mehmed II the Conqueror during 1464-1471. The building does not have any inscription. In the sources it is recorded that pure Angora garments were distributed here. The design of the building is of the classical type. There are 10 domes covering a rectangle designed to enclose the location, and there are 102 shops facing each other.

    According to historical records and registry books, Kurşunlu Han was built as a foundation to finance Mehmet Pasha's (Mehmet the Conqueror's vizier) alms giving in Üsküdar, Istanbul. It does not have an inscription. During the repairs of 1946, coins of the Murat II period were discovered. The findings indicate that the Han (inn, caravanserai) existed in the fifteenth century. The Han has the typical design of Ottoman Period hans. There is a courtyard and an arcade in the middle and they are surrounded by two-storey rooms. There are 28 rooms on the ground floor, 30 rooms on the first floor. The rooms have furnaces. There is a barn with an "L" type on the ground floor on west and south directions of the rooms. On the north side of the han there are 11 shops and 9 shops on east side and 4 shops facing each other within the garden. The inn (han) was built by Mehmet Pasha and in 1467 Mehmet Pasha was promoted to Prime Minister (Grand Vizier). Upon orders by Mahmut Pasha the vaulted bazaar was built. He kept his position until 1470. He had his mosque, soup kitchen and madrasa in Üsküdar, and his body is buried there.

    These two buildings constituting the museum today were abandoned after the fire in 1881.

    Exhibited artifacts

    * Palaeolithic Age (....8000): The age is represented by the remains discovered in the Antalya Karain Cave. The people of Palaeolithic Age were hunting and collecting communities living in caves. The stone and bone tools of the people of that Age are exhibited.

    * Neolithic Age (8000-5500) : During this age food production began and first settlements were established by the communities of this age, the artefacts of the age were discovered in two important centers of the age, namely Çatalhöyük and Hacılar and are exhibited in the museum. The remains include the mother goddess sculptures, stamps, earthenware containers, agricultural tools made of bone.

    * Chalcolithic Age (Copper-Stone) (B.C. 5500-3000): In addition to stone tools, copper was processed and used in daily life during this age, and rich remains dating from this Age were discovered in Hacılar, Canhasan, Tilkitepe, Alacahöyük and Alişar and are exhibited in the museum.

    * Early Bronze Age (B.C. 3000-1950): The people living in Anatolia in the beginning of third millennium B.C. added tin to copper and alloy to copper and invented bronze. They also worked all metals of the age with casting and hammering techniques. Valuable metals, magnificent death presents discovered from royal tombs of Alacahöyük, ruins from Hasanoğlan, Mahmatlar, Eskiyapar, Horoztepe, Karaoğlan, Merzifon, Etiyokuşu, Ahlatlıbel, Karayavşan, Bolu, Beycesultan Semahöyük, Karaz-Tilki tepe constitute the rich Old Bronze Age and are exhibited in the museum.

    * Hittite Period (B.C. 1750-1200): The first political union in Anatolia in second millennium was established by the Hittites in the Kızılırmak basin. The capital city was Boğazköy (Hattusa) and other important centers were İnandık, Eskiyapar, Alacahöyük, Alişar, Ferzant. Embossed bull figure containers, earthenware artifacts, tablets of government archives, seals in the name of the king can be seen.

    * Phrygian Period (B.C. 1200-700) : The Phrygians immigrated from the Balkans in the 1200s and acquired control over Anatolia, their center was Gordion. The works of art discovered in Gordion and its ruins are the best examples of the Phrygians and are exhibited in the museum.

    * Late Hittite Period (B.C. 1200-700) : Upon end of the Hittite Empire, some Hittite communities established province states in south and south-east Anatolia, and the Late Hittite Principalities period ensued. Malatya-Arslantepe, Karkamış (Carchemish) and Sakçagözü are some important Late Hittite settlements.

    * Urartian Period (B.C. 1200-600) : The Urartian civilization reached an advanced architecture and mining technology in centers like Altıntepe, Adilcevaz, Kayalıdere, Patnos, Van, Çavuştepe and lived during the same times as the Phrygians.

    * Lydian Period (B.C. 1200-546) : The origin of Lydian art comes from the Bronze Age in which there were relations, friendly or hostile, between their ancestors and the Hittites. Lydians made spectacular progress in Iron Age especially from Gyges period to Croesus (685 BC to 547 BC). The exhibited artifacts mostly date from the 6th century BC.

    * Collections including Greek, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine period artifacts from the first millennium, made of gold, silver, glass, marble and bronze.

    * Coins represent exceptional cultural assets.

    * Ancient jewellery.

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    Museum of Anatolian Civilizations

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Sep 20, 2008

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    The Museum of Anatolian Civilizations (Turkish: Anadolu Medeniyetleri Müzesi) is located on the south side of Ankara Castle. It consists of the old Ottoman Mahmut Paþa bazaar storage building, and the Kurþunlu Han.

    Because of Atatürk's desire to establish a Hittite museum, the buildings were bought upon the suggestion of Hamit Zübeyir Koþay. After the remodelling and repairs were completed (1938 -1968), the building was opened to the public as the Ankara Archaeological Museum. It is one of the richest museums in the world.

    You match my 3 min 42 sec VIDEO-Clip Ankara Museum of Anatolian Civilizations Part I ,
    4 min 13 sec VIDEO-Clip Ankara Museum of Anatolian Civilizations Part II .

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Ankara on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 39º 56' 19.31" N 32º 51' 43.34" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Museum of Anatolian Civilizations .

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  • mikelisaanna's Profile Photo

    Museum of Anatolian Civilization

    by mikelisaanna Written Aug 31, 2008

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    The museum's main entrance
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    This is the one of the best museums in Turkey. Although not large, it houses an outstanding collection of artifacts from Turkey's various ancient civilizations. The strongest part of the collection are the sections on the neolithic era (which features numerous artifacts from the excavations at Catalhoyuk), the Bronze Age, the Assyrians, and the Hittites. The museum also has statues from the Greek and Roman Eras, an exhibit of coinage from various eras, and artifacts from Gordion (the home of legendary King Midas). In addition, the museum has as outdoor collection of statues, sarcophagi, and large vases.

    Plan to spend about 2 hours in the museum, although you could blow through it more quickly if you don't read the descriptions, which are in both English and Turkish. There are small indoor and outdoor cafes if you want to take a break.

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    Museum of Anatolian civilizations

    by fachd Updated May 1, 2008

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    King Midas Skull
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    In Ankara we visited (Anadolu Medeniyetleri Muzesi) the museum of Anatolian civilizations. It is quite large museum. The collection is lay out chronologically to show the development of human history of every civilization that passed through Anatolia. The museum has the most comprehensive Hittite collection in the world.

    In the museum you will find artefacts from Neolithic, Paleolithic, Calcolithic periods, the early Bronze Age, the Old Hittite, the New Hittite, Phrygian, the Lydian and others.

    The museum won the European Museum Of The Year Award in 1997. Even though I don't know much of the different periods, perhaps little bit of of the Hittite, I found the museum interesting. I think Anatolian Museum is a must visit.

    Open Hours: 09.00 - 17.00 Mon - Sun
    Admission 10YTL ($7.50)

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    Outstanding museum

    by albaaust Written Mar 3, 2008

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    Anatolian Civilisation Museum
    This was a wonderful museum that Tosun took us to. The building itself is actually an old restored covered market dating from the 15th Century. It houses a collection of artefacts tracing the history of Anatolia from the 6th century. The exhibits cover a number of ancient Anatolian civilisations including the Palaeolithic, Neolithic, Assyrian, Hittite and Phrygian civilisations. The most impressive exhibits from our point of view were the Hittite reliefs with English explanations. (See photo) The museum justly deserves its 1997 Best European Museum award. There is a small coffee shop inside the museum. Open every day except Monday (8:45 - 5:15) 10YTL entry.

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    Museum of Anatolian Civilisations

    by voyageur2 Written May 26, 2006

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    If you search for history, culture and art in Ankara, I strongly recommend you Museum of Anatolian Civilisations( "Anadolu Medeniyetleri Müzesi" in Turkish)
    Allow at least half day for that exciting journey through the history of mankind.

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    The Museum of Anatolian Civilizations

    by Profsmiley Updated Feb 1, 2005

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    www.tourismturkey.org

    Anadolu Medeniyetleri Müzesi is one of the richest museums in Turkey, and is located next to the citadel.

    Artifacts from the various civilizations in Anatolia, starting from the Stone Age (50,000 B.C., Middle Paleolithic Period), and periods until the Roman Period (second century A.D.) can be seen here.

    Make sure you allow yourself enough time to enjoy the museum thoroughly.

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    Museum of Anatolian Civilication

    by MalenaN Updated Sep 11, 2004

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    Mother goddess

    The flat marble idols of Kültepe depicting the mother goddess, is a unique group. The two-headed example, and the Alacahöyük twin idols, prove the persistence of the type, with the Catalhöyük figurine as the earliest example.

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    Museum of Anatolian Civilisation

    by MalenaN Updated Sep 11, 2004

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    Museum of Anatolian Civilisation

    This is a must see as the best artefacts from excavations made in Anatolia can be found here. In the basement there are exhibitions of Greek and Roman artefacts but the best part is the different rooms on the ground floor showing the pre-classical civilisations of Anatolia.
    As you enter the museum you will start your tour from the right and come to rooms with items from the Palaeolithic period, Neolithic period (Catal Hüyük), Chalcolithic era, Bronze age (Alacahöyük), Assyrian (Kültepe), Hittite (Hattusas), Phrygian (Gordion), Urartian and Lydian eras.

    The museum is housed in an old Han (covered market with workshops) from the 15th century.
    The entrance fee is 10 000 000 TL.
    It might be closed on Mondays.

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