Altinkum Things to Do

  • I see no ships!
    I see no ships!
    by jinkersho
  • One of the may beach/diving stops...
    One of the may beach/diving stops...
    by jinkersho
  • Taffs boat
    Taffs boat
    by jinkersho

Most Recent Things to Do in Altinkum

  • apollo's temple and the market

    by scattybat Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    apollo's temple is just a pile of old stones, but take the time to walk round and learn the history. will your house be there in 2000 years time? it makes a change from the pushy shopkeepers and cafes, and you will be amazed at the skills of the people of the past.

    the market is close to the temple, there is a night market and the saturday market. once you have waded through all the designer fakes (you MUST haggle or you will be ripped off, and check the bags to make sure you have the correct stuff) there is a turkish market at the back. this market is like ours used t be 40 years ago and you get a real feel for turkish life. so get your designer fakes, some are really goood, but give the othher side a look too.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • Taffy's British Boat

    by jinkersho Written Jul 11, 2008

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    I see no ships!
    4 more images

    My parents own property here and I have been several times over the last few years. I wish to pass this on to anyone considering a boat trip. As one enters the general area of the main beach, go across to the right and keep walking. You will find several boats moored up and available for trips. They are cheap and promise you the earth. All well and good. However, what you will not know is that many of them offer you an all inclusive trip at a very attractive price which includes all you can drink and free lunch. The food is pre-frozen and thawed out on the day. If it doesn't get eaten, it gets re-frozen and used again the next day. In 48+ degrees, this is not healthy. The 'free' alcoholic drinks run out very quickly on the trips and the bottled water is quite often tap water put into mineral water bottles. I have experienced this. Taffys boat will only take Brits and has a strict maximum loading quota. He never runs out of drinks, of any kind and all the food is prepared freshly in the galley. Any left overs from first serving is brought out on deck for free second helfpings if anyone is still hungry. I don'tknow Taff so I am not trying to advertise his business, I am merely suggesting that you might be better placed there on his trips. For an all inclusive day, you are looking at about 20 quid per person. Well worth it, brilliant day out!

    Related to:
    • Diving and Snorkeling
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Beaches

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    Going to the beach

    by mvtouring Written Jul 8, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At the beach

    Hey, what else did we come here for? The only reason most people come out to Turkey is to get pissed and go home with a great tan. The beaches are lovely and the water even better. A lot of time was spent in and out of the water due to the heat. The only problem with the beaches are the constant harassing of the guys trying to sell either excursions or ice-cream. Just hide behind your shades and read a magazine and they then tend to leave you alone.

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    Apollo temple - Didum

    by mvtouring Written Jul 8, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    apolo temple

    We drove past this temple many times, before I finally visited it. Driving past it, it makes a tremendous impact on you. It is quite a big temple and found in 1962 by German archeologists and the temple existed before 10th century BC.

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    Apollo temple the columns

    by mvtouring Written Jul 8, 2004

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    Apollo temple, Didum

    Standing amongst these columns are extremely intimidating and really makes you feel small. The architects and builders of this period were extremely skilled craftsman, they accomplished what we are not able to do with the best machinery available to us.

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    Head of Gorgon

    by mvtouring Written Jul 8, 2004

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    Head of Gorgon

    This fragment of a frieze dating back to 2nd Century AD, is probably the best known item of the Turkish cultural heritage. It is used on all the posters promoting Turkey and only 5 minutes from Altinkum and the Altena Temple in Didum

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    Didyama

    by mvtouring Written Jul 8, 2004

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    Didum lion

    The research concerning the origins of the names of Didyama and Didymaion has been a subject of discussion going on for years. Along with several other myths, it is believed that the name means "twin temples". However no hard evidence could be found so it remains a myth.
    At Didum you will find the temple of Apollo and just after you have entered the site, you will see this copy of a majestic lion that was found here during escavations.

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    Miletus theatre - orchestra

    by mvtouring Written Jul 8, 2004

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    Miletus theatre - orchestra

    This is the base standing in the orchestra. The tripod cauldron and reliefs of frigoons are just marvelous to look at. I find it so hard to belief that these things remained in-tact for so many years, have to pinch myself that I am actually touching it and feeling it.

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    The Caravenserai - Miletus

    by mvtouring Written Jul 8, 2004

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    The Caravenserai - Miletus

    The caravanserai, located to the south-east of the theatre, was built in the 15th century . It comprises a courtyard and rooms for lodging. The lower floor of the two-storeyed building was used as stables, and the upper floor to lodge travellers.

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    Miletus Theatre

    by mvtouring Written Jul 6, 2004

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    Miletus Theatre

    This theatre was first erected in the 4th century BC and it has taken its present form by later alterations undergone in the Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods. The theatre could seat 5,300 spectators in hte Hellenistic period but this grew to 25,00 spectators in the Roman period. This theatre was mainly used for lion fights

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    Byzantine church - Priene

    by mvtouring Written Jul 6, 2004

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    Byzantine church - Priene

    The church was built in the 6th century A.D, understood to be the church for the Archbishdopric and comprises of three wings. The middle nave is separated from the others by the rows of Doric columns on its sides. The apse has not completely been escavated.
    It is understood that the church originally had a flat roof, and that the dome was added later.

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    The Theatre at Priene

    by mvtouring Written Jul 6, 2004

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    The Theatre at Priene

    Built in the 4th century BC this theatre is still in good condition. Like all ancient Greek theatres, the building consist of three main parts i.e. the Skene (stage building), the Orchestra (horseshoe shaped space in middle) and the Cavea (space where the spectators sat).

    Taking into consideration all the present day remains, it has been calculated that the cevea had 50 rows of seats and that it had the capacity to seat an audience of 5,000 people.

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    The Temple Athena

    by mvtouring Written Jul 6, 2004

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    Temple Athena

    Dating back to 4th century BC, this temple, located on the culminating point of the city, rose over a wide terrace of rocks and the defence walls and it was the largest, oldest, most important and most magnificent building in Priene. It was oriented on an east-west axis in conformity with the city plan and faced east.
    The building was completely destroyed in an earthquake in ancient times and the pieces were scattered over a large area. Fortunately, the construction of the plan and the reconstruction of the building have been possible through the fragments found in the excavations.
    The building rests on a three-stepped platform, 37.2 meters long and 19.15 metres wide. Th columns of which the bases are built in the Ephesus type, have 24 flutes in their shaft.

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    Soke Market

    by mvtouring Written Jun 29, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Soke fruit market

    Also try and take the trip to Soke Market, its massive and lots of Bargains on offer, the Gold shops there are also cheaper than in the resorts, we picked up some real bargains, Make sure you Barter as you will definately get it cheaper that way.

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    Ephasis and Pammukale

    by mvtouring Written Jun 29, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pammukale

    We opted for the two day trip to Ephasis and Pammukale, which was very good value for money and enjoyable but very tiring. It is two very full days, the first day is spent at Ephasis which consist of a 3 hour stroll in the heat through the town, ensure that you take your hat and plenty of water with as it turns warm very quickly and we saw no places to buy more water. A lot of time is spent in the coach as it is quite a distance away. We slept in a lovely hotel in Pammukale that had a lovely pool, thermal bath and jaccuzzi, and all were used by us. Dinner was at the top of the hotel overlooking the cotton clad mountains in this dry and dusty landscape area. Early the following morning we went up to the white mountain and walked around. Do ensure that you take your sunglasses with you as it could be blinding. Afterwards we spent 3 hours at the Cleopatra pool which was fantastic before our long trip back to Altinkum. Was well worth doing though and something that I would recommend rather than doing a one day trip to Pammukale where you spend 6 hours on the road.

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