Didyma Things to Do

  • This column was actually never raised
    This column was actually never raised
    by mtncorg
  • The supports for the column pieces still in place
    The supports for the column pieces still...
    by mtncorg
  • Sacred Way as it enters into Didyma
    Sacred Way as it enters into Didyma
    by mtncorg

Best Rated Things to Do in Didyma

  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    milet,important city....in the fields!

    by cbeaujean Written Nov 15, 2004

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    fields and theater

    once upon a time...a harbour!...but the sea is gone....and the inhabitants too!
    from 7 cent.BC,a city of scientists:thales (geometry),hecatee (geography),anaximene (philosophy).....

    at the bottom,behind cotton fields,you can see the huge amphitheater....

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    Milet. Ionic Stoa

    by SirRichard Written Dec 13, 2002

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    Milet's main highlights are the Theatre and the Ionic Stoa, the only remains of a huge atrium with a few columns still standing.
    It was a very important greek city in Asia Minor, and held many cultural schools that influenced all the Mediterrnean area, as the one of Thales of Milet, Pitagoras...
    It was the first city to use the octogonal plan, used afterwards by the romans.

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    ADYTON

    by mtncorg Written May 29, 2012

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    West inside the Adyton to the naiskos
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    The inner sanctum was reserved for the priests and priestesses involved with the temple – adyton means ‘do not enter’. From the eastern porch priests would enter the adyton by one of two long tunnels. Inside, the adyton was located at a lower level and there was an inner courtyard. Here lay a smaller temple housing the sacred spring – naiskos – and the cult statue of Apollo – returned to Didyma from Persia by Seleucus I Nicator around 300 BC.

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    MILETUS

    by Lalique Written Sep 24, 2002

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    MILETUS
    It's an ancient Ionian city. Once being the greasted in the region, Miletus lost its harbor to silt. The site is nownearly 8km from the sea. Its large harbor was a great commerce center of the Greek Empire, figuring predominantly in Roman times as well.

    Today Miletus' most notable features is its Graeco-Roman theatre. Originally built by Greeks to seat 5300 people, its capacity was nearly tripled by the Romans. A climb uo the hillside above the theatre provides a spectacular view of the fertile plain which once was sea.

    The city ruins include a harbor monument adorned with carvings of marine life on one side and a half-man half-fish triton on the other; the remarcably welk preserved Baths of Faustina, erected by the wife of Marcus Aurelius.

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    DIDIM (Didyma)

    by Lalique Written Sep 24, 2002

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    DIDIM (Didyma)
    One of the three well preserved Ionic cities in the region. Though ancient Didim was not a city but rather the home of the God Apollo. Only priests were allowed to entry here to consult the oracle in the great Temple of Apollo. The site served as a divine sanctuary.

    The construction of the Temple began in 300BC and continued for the next 500 years. Of the Temple's original 120 columns 103 have been set up again. Some remain unadorned, evidence that the Temple was never completed.

    The Temple impresses with the size and the painstaking reconstruction by French and German teams. The Temple has an eloborate bust of Medusa. the nearby remains of Greek and Roman houses and a stadium have also been uncovered.

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  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    SACRED WAY

    by mtncorg Written May 29, 2012

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    Sacred Way as it enters into Didyma
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    Miletus was the gateway for pilgrims on their way to the nearby oracle at the Temple of Apollo in Didyma. This oracle rivaled the oracle in Delphi in ancient world notoriety. The temple dates to at least the 8th Century BC and was in the charge of a priestly caste known as the Branchids. Following the unsuccessful Milesian support of the Ionian Revolt, both Miletus and the Didyma temple were destroyed – 494 BC – and the Branchids were exiled to Sogdiana at the other end of the Persian Empire – NE Iran. The oracle was reconsecrated after Alexander the Great pushed the Persians out of Miletus in 334 BC. Miletus became the administrator for the temple, thereafter, annually electing one of its one as a prophet.

    From Miletus to Didyma is a 12 mile/24 km road that was known as the Sacred Way. Pilgrims visited both to take part in the annual spring festival known as the Didymeia and to uncover possible cards that fate might have in store for them in the future. The Sacred Way began at the Delphinion which was a shrine to Apollo Delphinos – Apollo in his dolphin incarnation as protector of ships and harbors. The Way then crossed through the center of Miletus flanked by porticoes and proceeded through the monumental Market Gate. To see the Market Gate, you will have to go to the Pergamon Museum in Berlin. Along the route were ritual way stations and statues of members of the Branchidae family as well as animal figures. Many of these statues can be seen today … in London at the British Museum courtesy of Charles Newton/19th Century. The paved road dates to the time of Emperor Trajan.

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  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    TEMPLE OF APOLLO

    by mtncorg Written May 29, 2012

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    Only three columns are left standing from 122
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    Didyma refers to twins in Greek and here it refers to the twin god/goddess Apollo and Artemis. Recent excavations have uncovered a sanctuary dedicated to Artemis, but the Temple of Apollo – the Didymaion – took center stage. An original Archaic temple was enlarged upon in the 6th Century BC and the family Branchidae took control. Ending up on the wrong side of the Ionian Revolt, in 494 BC, brought about the temple’s destruction by vengeful Persians, who also sent the Branchids to the other end of the empire in Sogdiana – NE Iran.

    The temple seen today dates from the reconsecration of 334 BC by Alexander the Great. Administrative responsibility fell to the nearby city of Miletus. A prophet/priest was annually elected by the citizens. The Milesians continued building the complex through the Roman era and if it had ever been completed, it would have been the largest in the ancient world. As such, it still ranks third after the Artemsion in Ephesus and the Temple of Hera on Samos. The design of all three temples are very similar since all three shared the same architects – Paionius fo Ephesus and Daphnis of Miletus.

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    COLUMNS

    by mtncorg Written May 29, 2012

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    Columns still rising into the sky
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    Originally there were 122 ionic columns surrounding the temple of which only three remain standing today. The columns date to the 2nd Century BC and are six feet in diameter at the base rising upwards some 60 feet high. Inscriptions show that three different contractors were responsible for the building of the temple. One column took a stonemason some 20,000 work days to complete. With a daily salary of two drachmae = 8.6 gm of silver, the craftsmanship of one column equaled 172 kg of silver.

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    ENTRY PORCH

    by mtncorg Written May 29, 2012

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    Inside the forest of columns on the entry porch
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    The faithful would come up into the temple from the east climbing some 14 steps. Here amongst a grove of some 12 columns, the priests would meet those seeking answers from the sibyl within. A well in front of the steps was used to ceremonially was parts of the body before ascending the stairs. There was a similar well inside the adyton with which the priestess would likewise prepare herself.

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    SACRED SPRING

    by mtncorg Written May 29, 2012

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    Sacred spring looked much like the entry spring
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    Located within a smaller temple within the large, the sacred spring was what ancient supplicants were after. For the proper gift riddles to one’s fate could be received. Well-known pilgrims included the Diadochoi generals Lysimachus and Seleucus I Nicator, as well as Roman emperors Augustus and Trajan.

    Oracles could only be given once every four days though the interval could be much longer. Each session was preceded by a three-day fast during which time the priestess did not leave the adyton. Then, after a ritual bath, she would enter the naiskos while supplicants would offer sacrifices and sing hymns outside the eastern entry to the complex. The sibyl would sit on an axle suspended over the spring, dipping her foot or dress into the water before answering questions presented to her. Unlike at Delphi, here both questions and answers were written out – a chresmographis was the special instrument used for the process.

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    GORGONS

    by mtncorg Written May 29, 2012

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    A bad hair day
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    The outer decorations of the temple complex were never completely finished but examples of what was can be discovered laying on the surrounding ground. Mighty bulls, lions and Gorgons feature prominently. The Gorgons were three sisters – Medusae, Stheno and Euryle – who had snakes for hair. They had the power to turn anyone looking at them into stone. They were regarded as patrons to secrecy – the whole process of questioning the oracle and interpreting the sibyl’s answers was supposed to be kept secret. A Gorgon’s face was also used as a charm against illness. Medusae you might remember was beheaded by Perseus using her reflection in his shield to guide his cutting blade.

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  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    Priene. Acropolis

    by SirRichard Written Dec 13, 2002

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    You have to be in good shape to climb to the highest part of the city by a narrow path, that takes 90 minutes to the very top. I didn't, but they say the views are incredible. If you decide to climb, send me the photos ;-)

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    The Temple

    by sandysmith Updated Feb 21, 2004

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    temple ruins

    The temple at Didyma, famous for its oracle, was dedicated to Apollo and was the richest and biggest of the Ionian temples on Anatolian soil.The temple is 60m wide,120m long and 24m. high and consists of 122 Ionic columns. The pronaos - the forecourt - had 12 columns standing on a a base structure with 7 steps all around.

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  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    after delphi,a leading oracle!

    by cbeaujean Written Nov 15, 2004

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    apollon temple

    built in 3rd century BC,a colossal setting: two ranks of 108 columns 20m height....but never finished!(you can understand rather easily why!)

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  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    amazing theater,built 4th cent.BC:25000 seats!

    by cbeaujean Updated Nov 15, 2004

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    milet,theater

    in the middle of cotton fields.....nowadays!
    very well preserved!
    rather easy climbing on seats rows:on the top you enjoy a magnificent view on the whole site and surroundings.

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